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Podcast title Student Caring - A Podcast for Professors
Website URL http://www.studentcaring.com/
Description Join professors de Roulet and Pecoraro as they encourage professors to achieve success.
Updated Sat, 22 Jul 2017 20:24:26 +0000
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Episodes

1. SC 225 Career Directions at the Beginning of Your Career
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 11.35Mb)

Description:

In this podcast, Daniel and David discuss topics for you to think about as you begin your career in academe. 



2. SC 224 Improving Instructor - Student Communication
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 15.58Mb)

Description:

In this podcast, Daniel and David discuss a very popular topic with their college faculty mentoring service: Improving Instructor - Student Communication.



3. SC 223 Course Design - The Student Mind
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 13.28Mb)

Description:

Professors de Roulet and Pecoraro focus on "Course Design - The Student Mind" in this podcast featuring their Professional Mentoring Service for Professors.



4. SC 222 Creating Successful Exams, Projects, and Field Trips
http://studentcaring.com/profe... download (audio/mpeg, 12.09Mb)

Description:

Professors de Roulet and Pecoraro focus on "Creating Successful Exams, Projects, and Field Trips" in this podcast featuring their Professional Mentoring Service for Professors.

Professors David C. Pecoraro and Daniel de Roulet, with over 50 years of combined teaching, faculty development and administrative experience, provide professional mentoring services for professors wishing to improve in the following areas:

Course organization and management Syllabus and lesson plan construction Creating successful examinations, assignments, projects, and field trips Improving instructor-student communication and rapport Constructing a career plan Mock job interview Other areas? (Let us know.)

5. SC 221 Creating a Syllabus and Lesson Plan
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 14.76Mb)

Description:

Professors de Roulet and Pecoraro focus on "Creating a Syllabus and Lesson Plan" in this podcast featuring their Professional Mentoring Service for Professors.



6. SC 220 Course Organization and Management
http://studentcaring.com/profe... download (audio/mpeg, 12.47Mb)

Description:

Professors de Roulet and Pecoraro focus on "Course Organization and Management" in this podcast featuring our new Professional Mentoring Service for Professors.



7. SC 219 Professional Mentoring Services for Professors
http://studentcaring.com/profe... download (audio/mpeg, 7.15Mb)

Description:

In this Post & Podcast, we introduce our professional mentoring services for professors.

 

Podcast Outline:
The origins of this service:

Throughout our careers we have observed many of our colleagues who had nowhere to turn for help and ended up leaving the teaching profession. Our research and reporting on the disturbing statistics about why so many professors are leaving the profession. Reference: Podcast Series on  Why Many Professors Are Leaving the Profession: 210 , 211, and 212. Our research and podcast series on professor burnout, base on the work of Dr. Dike Drummond’s book, Stop Physician Burnout. In his book he reports that teachers experience the second highest rate of burnout. Reference our Podcast Series on Burnout Solutions:  193, 194, and 195.   Also see the post: How To Avoid Burnout as a Professor. 1. Why is this service necessary? At most colleges and universities, if a professor is having trouble, there are few (if any) confidential sources to turn to. Teaching and class management are not taught to the majority of professors. For professors on tenure track who are struggling, immediate intervention is necessary. Confidential, useful advice helps all professors, as the demands of their jobs and the needs of our students change, 2. Why are we the ones to do it? We have a combined 50 years in the college classroom at both four-year and two-year schools. We have written, spoken, and have produced over 200 podcasts on teaching effectiveness. We have significant administrative experience in hiring, evaluating, and helping professors in our college careers (department chairs, hiring committees, faculty development chairs, dean, assoc. provost, student success representatives, student equity projects and committees) We are confidential. We honestly assess for each individual case whether we are the best people to help. 3. What does the program look like? We begin with a careful evaluation of the needs of a professor. We arrange a skype session to address the evaluation and answer further questions. We discuss needed resources and direct clients to the best places from which to gain them. We schedule a follow up session to check on progress, offering further advice and proposing fine tuning. 4. How is it arranged? Initial contact Collection of materials and flat fee Sessions scheduled

We are very enthusiastic about this. These services are something we believe in and think can be a great help to our colleagues.

~ Completely Confidential ~

Professors David C. Pecoraro and Daniel de Roulet, with over 50 years of combined teaching, faculty development and administrative experience, provide professional mentoring services for professors wishing to improve in the following areas:

Course organization and management Syllabus and lesson plan construction Creating successful examinations, assignments, projects, and field trips Improving instructor-student communication and rapport Constructing a career plan Mock job interview Other areas? (Let us know.)

You E-mail us with a one page narrative of your current situation and the area(s) where you want to improve.

We'll reply to you with a list of available dates and time for your one-hour appointment and payment information.             Start Step 1. 

1. You select a date and time, provide us with your contact information in the form of a telephone number or Skype account name. 2. Deposit $200. USD (One-time-flat-fee)  into our PayPal account.

1. We'll reply to you confirming the date and time of your session and your paid fee. 2. We begin an analysis of your narrative and prepare for your mentoring session. 

We'll telephone / Skype you at the scheduled time and conduct your session.

During this one precious hour, the two of us focus on you - your vision, your goals, and your personal and professional development. We find this most effective when it becomes a shared conversation between us.

Within 5 business days, we will E-mail you with an action plan and accompanying materials.
Available to you, is a thirty-minute followup session within 4 months from the first session. Just contact us to schedule that meeting.

###

Completely Confidential: We understand the personal and sensitive nature of these important areas and promise to you that we will never discuss them with anyone, ever. We retain your information only for the purposes of the above steps. When our communications are concluded, we delete all information.

Biographies
Professor David C. Pecoraro, M.F.A.
I have been a teaching college professor since 1980 and am passionate about all that I have learned about the profession of teaching, which I love. While I teach general education requirements in the arts, my department home has always been in the theatre. I teach courses in the area of design, management and production: Stage Management, Lighting Design, Introduction to Theatre, and others. I have taught at the undergraduate level at a community college and a private university and at the graduate level where I taught stage management for a large university.

I am passionate about interacting with my colleagues, globally, about the profession of teaching. Within that, of course, “Student Caring.” I have been teaching long enough to have observed how, when integrated with excellent instruction, can make all the difference in the world for the student. Within that scope, I am especially passionate about course design, in-class instruction, and the transition from college to career.

Dr. Daniel de Roulet, Ph.D.
After receiving a Ph.D. in English from the University of California, Irvine in 1992, I have been a college professor and administrator, and currently teach writing and literature.  I have led revisions to general education and first-year curricula, worked with developing educational assessment plans of student learning, and received undergraduate teaching awards. I have also coordinated a writing program for at-risk students. My experience is at four-year universities, a four-year college, and at community colleges.

My desire is to bring a sense of personal care into each class I teach, helping students to become adult thinkers and to be equipped for the world after college.  Nothing is quite like participating in a student’s discovery or rediscovery of education—this, and my continued learning in a community of students, motivates me to teach.  I also realize that we college professors are often woefully unprepared for the dynamics of the classroom.  My hope is to produce work that will encourages professors to take on as a life-long project the understanding of students and how to best teach them.

Prof. David C. Pecoraro ~ Dr. Daniel de Roulet

Frequently Asked Questions:

Can a colleague or colleagues join a mentoring session?
No. We want to focus on the needs of one individual at a time. Moreover, it is a good confidentiality practice, which we take very seriously. 

Can I record the mentoring session?
Yes. 

What languages does your mentoring services provide?
At this time, we only offer the English language. If you have a translator available to you, we can work with them.

Do you offer small group or faculty-retreat / in-service mentoring?
Yes. The sessions include:

A presentation on our most the most pressing needs for professors today. Guidance on creating action plans. Post-retreat / group evaluation of action plans. Optional individual post-retreat / group progress evaluation.

Group/faculty-retreat mentoring: $750. per half-day session; travel and lodging expenses; materials cost at $20 per participant; optional progress evaluations at $100. per participant

Contact Prof. Pecoraro for information about booking a group session. E-mail: david@studentcaring.com

 

 

 

 

Professional Mentoring Services for Professors

8. SC 218 Commencement Survival Techniques
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 7.24Mb)

Description:

Daniel and David share some commencement ceremony survival techniques in this podcast.



9. SC 217 Part Four: Getting the Job - or Not
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 6.93Mb)

Description:

In this, PODCAST #4 in our series on the professor job search, Daniel and David discuss best practices to follow when you are offered the job - or not. (Listen for the announcement about our mock interview service.)



10. SC 216 Part Three: The Professor Interview
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 7.30Mb)

Description:

If you have ever wondered what the interview will be like for a job as a professor, this podcast is for you.



11. SC 215 Part Two: Preparing for the Interview
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 6.65Mb)

Description:

On Cinco de Quatro, Daniel and David offer action step tips for those of you preparing for your professor interview.



12. SC 214 Part Two: Searching for a Job as a Professor
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 6.11Mb)

Description:

Daniel and David discuss what not to do when applying for a job as a professor and also how to exceed their expectations.



13. SC 213 Part One: Searching for a Job as a Professor
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 6.49Mb)

Description:

Daniel and David discuss first steps and considerations in the process of searching for a job in higher education.



14. SC 212 Part Three: Why Many Professors are Leaving the Profession
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 8.49Mb)

Description:

In this podcast, we reveal part 3 about why so many new professors quit the profession.



15. SC 211 Part Two: Why Many Professors are Leaving the Profession
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 7.52Mb)

Description:

In this podcast, we continue to identify the primary causes why new professors decide to leave teaching.



16. SC 210 Why Many Professors are Leaving the Profession
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 7.41Mb)

Description:

In this new podcast series, we identify the primary causes why new professors decide to leave teaching.



17. SC 209 Making the Most of Free Time
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 6.86Mb)

Description:

In this podcast, Daniel and David offer tips about how we professors can make the best use of our free time. - Imagine that - FREE TIME!



18. SC 208 What Doesn't Kill You
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 7.58Mb)

Description:

In this podcast, David reads a story about a student and her professor.
Our source is an excellent book that we recommend:
Chicken Soup for the Soul / Campus Chronicles / 101 Inspirational, Supportive, and Humorous Stories about Life in College by, Jack Cranfield  AMAZON LINK

Daniel and David discuss their reaction to this story.

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David



19. SC 207 Teaching Our Students how to Help Each Other
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 14.70Mb)

Description:

David and Daniel discuss the benefits of teaching our students how to help each other.

 

 

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David



20. SC 206 Group Learning and Teacher Propaganda
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 19.82Mb)

Description:

More from their "Good Stuff" file, David and Daniel discuss some successful teaching strategies with group learning. Listen in! Podcast No. 206.

 

 

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David



21. SC 205 Group Learning with Lady Gaga
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 17.21Mb)

Description:

 

 

From their "Good Stuff" file, David and Daniel discuss some success full teaching strategies with group learning. Listen in! Podcast No. 205.

 

 

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David



22. SC 204 Caring for Underprepared Students
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 13.95Mb)

Description:

SITUATION: You discover that one (or more) of your students are not prepared for the class you are teaching.

Professors de Roulet and Pecoraro discuss how to care for students in this situation.

 

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David



23. SC 203 Your Over-achieving Student Is Bored With Your Class.
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 14.38Mb)

Description:

SITUATION: You notice that one of your students is bored and not engaged with the subject.

Professors de Roulet and Pecoraro discuss how to challenge your student.



24. SC 202 A Student Confides Their Depression
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 12.56Mb)

Description:

SITUATION: While reading and grading a student’s writing assignment, they reveal to you that they are deeply depressed.

Listen to Daniel and David on Friday - USA - Inauguration Day, as they explore this topic.

 



25. SC 201 Complaints About Another Professor
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 18.83Mb)

Description:

A student comes to your office hours and is complaining that one of their professors is not teaching them what they need to learn in the class, which a pre-requisite to your class.

 

Listen to Daniel and David on Friday the Thirteenth, as they explore this topic.



26. SC 200 Thank You Notes from Students
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 16.33Mb)

Description:

Professors Pecoraro & de Roulet celebrate Podcast No. 200 in this special episode featuring students letters to their professors.



27. SC 199 Cheating During a Test
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 13.02Mb)

Description:

Following a test, you receive an email from a student informing you that the person sitting in front of them was looking at their smart phone during the test. They say: “You should be paying closer attention during your tests.”

Listen to Daniel and David as they explore this situation.

Referenced Web Page:  Podcast #15  http://studentcaring.com/howtocheatincollege/

 

What would you do?

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David



28. SC 198 Your Star Student's Star is Fading
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 19.90Mb)

Description:

You are the Professor In charge of a group or team based course. These could be a sports team, performing group, or research laboratory. Your STAR student, who was carrying the group has become unreliable.

Consequences:
The team is loosing games - consequently casting a negative light on your university and could result in less funding.

The research project is falling behind schedule and is in jeopardy of loosing their funding. This will directly impact your income.

OPTIONS / DISCUSSION

Daniel: I fell like we are back in ETHICS 101, this is not an easy situation.

You and the student:
You need to put aside all of the other concerns and concentrate on the student.
Try to discover why their performance is faltering and seek to help them.
What can I do as a professor?

Why do high achieving students falter?
They can be in a position of high responsibility for the first time in their lives.

We are not there to put out the absolute best product, we are there to help students learn.
The team or performance group may not be the best, that's okay. 
If the focus is on winning, then we are not really teaching anymore.

If your team is very public, the decision you make will influence the public about not only you, but your university. 

It is wise not rely on one person (student) to be in a key leadership position. Build a team.

What would you do?

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 



29. SC 197 Can't Afford the Tuition
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 14.01Mb)

Description: Student Centered Decisions While Professoring
SC 197 Can't Afford the Tuition NOTES FROM OUR PODCAST Daniel and David explore a challenging student situation and discuss options.

SITUATION
Your student comes to your office hours during finals week and informs you that their parents can't afford the tuition and they have to go back home to a more affordable and less prestigious college. They want your advice.

You have someone in front of you who is very much in need of good advice.

OPTIONS / DISCUSSION
Take time to actively listen to what your student has to say.

During difficulty meetings like this, recognize that what you say to your student may be forgotten. It is a good idea to take notes, then give them to your student - on paper. 

Daniel:  Often times, I forget particular situations with my students in my classroom. It would server me well, as a prof. to remember that a number of my students are there because they or their family are making pretty significant sacrifices. As I walk into the classroom, I want to be able to give them good things. I want to be able to honor the sacrifice and commitment they are making by offering them the best that I can offer them.

David: This may be the last time I sit and visit with this student. I want to make sure that every single word I say and the advice I give is "good." Last impressions last a very long time.

Advice for your student.
Encourage them to look deep with themselves and recall their hopes and dreams. Explain that this change in their academic career should not dissuade them. There are many educational institutions that help them to realize their goals.

After giving them the good financial advice, say something truthful and encouraging to that student about their potential. You may offer to write them a letter of recommendation that is affirming.

Share with your student a story of a previous student, or yourself, who was in a similar situation and it turned out well.

 

What would you do?

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David



30. SC 196 Student Centered Decisions While Professoring
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 19.14Mb)

Description: Student Centered Decisions While Professoring
SC 196 Tough Love or Tough?

 

 NOTES FROM OUR PODCAST Daniel and David explore a challenging student situation and discuss options.

A likable student with potential is not performing up to PAR.

The grade they will earn while in your class will determine their future at your college.

 

What would you do?

 



31. SC 195 Burnout Solutions #3
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 27.53Mb)

Description:

 NOTES FROM OUR PODCAST

Focusing on the positive: Multitasking comes upon us slowly as we take on additional responsibilities over time. Often, we can't do much about our current schedule, however, we can look ahead to a future academic year and make some changes. During your holiday break: Look at how your last semester went. Think about how many plates you have in the air. What plates give you enjoyment and which ones do not? Choose not to make the negative aspects of your job – a focus. Journaling can provide a place to reflect on your job and a place to process your feelings. A Holiday Break Challenge: Look over your daily school life calendar.
Mark in red those activities that you do not enjoy. Mark in green those activities that you do enjoy. Plot a strategy to turn more of your hours to green. What do others observe that you do well and enjoy?

Try to remember, during this break, why you got into this career in the first place.

 

We’re basing our podcasts on an application of Dr. Dike Drummond’s book, Stop Physician Burnout: What to Do When Working Harder Isn’t Working. Dr. Drummond was a successful family physician, working his dream job in a dream location, when he realized he could not continue. His burnout was so severe that he walked away from the practice of medicine, and now dedicates his time to helping doctors avoid burnout and find meaning and satisfaction in their profession.

Unfortunately, most of the ideas and observations Dr. Drummond presents are also present in higher education. Our task will be to apply what fits to the educator’s world, and to offer some discipline-specific observations as well.

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 



32. SC 194 Burnout Solutions #2
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 18.91Mb)

Description: SOLUTIONS TO EDUCATOR BURNOUT NO. 2 FOR ALL OF OUR U.S. FRIENDS, HAPPY THANKSGIVING! BURNOUT IS A DILEMMA, RATHER THAN A PROBLEM: If your problem is that you have to grade 25 papers, the solution is to grade them. REALITY CHECK: You realize that when you grade them, they will be done, but what will happen next? There’s always more. That’s a dilemma. We seek to adopt a mindset that solves our dilemma. We see our colleagues always taking on extra work. Dr. Dike Drummond:    “You solve a problem and you manage a dilemma.” In his book, Dr. Drummond differentiates between “problems” and “dilemmas.” A problem has a clear solution and can, indeed, be solved. A dilemma is something more complicated—something without a clear solution or a problem that has been in place for a very long time. Faculty who serve on college or university committees may be tempted to work on what they think are problems, only to find that their work is seemingly being wasted on a dilemma. Politics in a department might seem like a problem, but the interpersonal roots of the problem, compounded over time, can have transformed what was once a problem into a dilemma. You and who every your boss is need have a talk about healthy productivity and personal energy. Daniel, upon his return from a recent sabbatical trip to Ethiopia states: I realized that I need to put a couple of things in my life that prevent me from using all of my life for work. DO THE BIG 180: Focus on what you want instead of what you don’t. As educators, we are problem solvers. Sometimes the problems can’t be solved. How many emails do you receive that are negative? Do you know what this student did?!#% Find something that you really enjoy at work. What would your job look like if you focused on that one thing? MORE TO COME!

We’re basing our podcasts on an application of Dr. Dike Drummond’s book, Stop Physician Burnout: What to Do When Working Harder Isn’t Working. Dr. Drummond was a successful family physician, working his dream job in a dream location, when he realized he could not continue. His burnout was so severe that he walked away from the practice of medicine, and now dedicates his time to helping doctors avoid burnout and find meaning and satisfaction in their profession.

Unfortunately, most of the ideas and observations Dr. Drummond presents are also present in higher education. Our task will be to apply what fits to the educator’s world, and to offer some discipline-specific observations as well.

WE WELCOME YOUR COMMENTS, FEEDBACK AND GUEST POST SUBMISSIONS.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

Click this Link to Listen on Stitcher Smart Radio

Click this Link to Subscribe via Google Play

Click this Link to Subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed)

 

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SC 194 BURNOUT SOLUTIONS #2



33. SC 193 Burnout Solutions #1
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 19.79Mb)

Description:

SC 193 Burnout Solutions #1

We’re basing our podcasts on an application of Dr. Dike Drummond’s book, Stop Physician Burnout: What to Do When Working Harder Isn’t Working. Dr. Drummond was a successful family physician, working his dream job in a dream location, when he realized he could not continue. His burnout was so severe that he walked away from the practice of medicine, and now dedicates his time to helping doctors avoid burnout and find meaning and satisfaction in their profession.

Unfortunately, most of the ideas and observations Dr. Drummond presents are also present in higher education. Our task will be to apply what fits to the educator’s world, and to offer some discipline-specific observations as well.

 SOLUTIONS TO EDUCATOR BURNOUT   No. 1:  Your inner perfectionist critic: We are our own worse critic. Oh, I could do better. I can't grade papers fast enough. I could have done better in that meeting. Our response: "Thank you for sharing." No. 2:  Burnout is a problem, not a dilemma: We can solve problems. No. 3:  Do the big 180: Focus on what you want instead of what you don't. No. 4: You are not a super hero, become a great plate spinner instead: Learn how to spin one plate really well. Once you have done that, consider adding another plate. No. 5:  Celebrate all wins: Lean to be happy will all wins and don't focus on the failures. Treat yourself like a good dog. (A cute one.) Your inner perfectionist critic: Our desire to be perfect is motivated by a strong desire to be the best. Our training (graduate school) forces us to strive for perfection. Perfection can lead to despair.  Student: "Oh, that professor is just coasting." Talk back to the voices in your head: "I hear what you're saying, thanks." Now, move on. Your inner perfectionist critic: Our desire to be perfect is motivated by a strong desire to be the best. Our training (graduate school) forces us to strive for perfection.

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 



34. SC 192 The Specific Causes of Burnout in Educators 3
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 14.92Mb)

Description:

Podcast 192:  The Specific Causes of Burnout in Educators (Part 3)

 

Conditioning—how our educations set unrealistic expectations for our careers:

 

The expectations we experienced in graduate training have profound effects on the expectations of ourselves that we carry into our careers.  Consider the following list of expectations:

 

We are assigned reading lists that we cannot possibly finish. We need to keep current in our fields by reading even more. We are to be judged, professionally, on the quality and quantity of our research and our publications or productions. We are often not trained to teach. Teaching is just something we do to help pay for our graduate educations.

 

Compare this to the typical job of a professor who does not find himself or herself working in a primarily research-oriented job where course loads are at a minimum:

 

You are evaluated and promoted primarily on the basis of your teaching. Part of your evaluation is based on service to the college or university (committee work and advising), which you did not do as a graduate student. You are expected to publish, even though your time for research is greatly diminished from your days as a graduate student.

 

We have seen a number of colleagues who feel like failures in their profession, even when they are succeeding in their current jobs as educators.  Why?  Because they are not in the type of school their graduate work trained them for, and they are not living up to the expectations ingrained in them by their graduate work.

 



35. SC 191 The Specific Causes of Burnout in Educators 2
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 16.87Mb)

Description:

SC 191 The Specific Causes of Burnout in Educators 2

ADDITIONAL CAUSES OF BURNOUT

Poor leadership:

 

Poor bosses are the number one reason employees state for leaving a job. In education, because of the unclear lines of authority present in the profession,  we often have several bosses:  a mentor, the department chair, the dean, and higher administration.  Each make demands on the educator that must be met. Educators are by nature idealists and people who like to improve or fix things. Realizing that co-workers or “bosses” do no share their idealizing, or realizing that certain things will not be fixed, can be devastating to an educator’s morale. In his book, Dr. Drummond differentiates between “problems” and “dilemmas.” A problem has a clear solution and can, indeed, be solved.  A dilemma is something more complicated—something without a clear solution or a problem that has been in place for a very long time.  Faculty who serve on college or university committees may be tempted to work on what they think are problems, only to find that their work is seemingly being wasted on a dilemma.  Politics in a department might seem like a problem, but the interpersonal roots of the problem, compounded over time, can have transformed what was once a problem into a dilemma. A dysfunctional administration, or a school culture that changes very slowly (glacially), can lead to disappointment and burnout. Administrators come from several different backgrounds: they have been educated in college administration; they are highly ambitious individuals who find the administration of an institution more interesting than the practice of education; they have worked their way through the ranks and want to give what they have learned to the institution and their colleagues; they are burned out educators looking to retreat into other sorts of work.  Some of these backgrounds negatively affect administrative views of faculty, and can lead to faculty disillusionment (just as faculty stereotypes of administrators, expressed in some of the categories above, can negatively affect faculty views of administration).

Life issues:

 

As educators, we are always “on stage.”  You must be fully there in a classroom to be an effective instructor.  Difficult life issues, such as those listed below, shorten your fuse, drain your energy levels, and make it difficult to be fully present to your students and colleagues:

 

Health (your own health and the health of loved ones) Finances Family problems

 

As educators, we cannot “retreat” for a time into our offices, or into an assigned project.  We need to be “on stage”—even when that’s the last thing we feel like doing.

WE WELCOME YOUR COMMENTS, FEEDBACK AND GUEST POST SUBMISSIONS.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

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###

SC 191 THE SPECIFIC CAUSES OF BURNOUT IN EDUCATORS 2



36. SC 190 The Specific Causes of Burnout in Educators 1
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 19.05Mb)

Description:

SC 190 The Specific Causes of Burnout in Educators 1

Dr. Drummond identifies five general categories of burnout’s causes:

 

The profession itself Your specific job Poor leadership Life issues Conditioning: the unrealistic expectations our educations have placed on us

 

Education has its own specifics that it brings to these categories.

 

The profession itself:

 

Never-ending work and hours: the work of grading papers, doing research, and preparing lectures is never finished.  These tasks will take up as much time as you give them.  Educators find themselves continuing their work into evenings and weekends, never feeling caught-up or well enough prepared. Not seeing enough specific results—wave after wave of starting at the beginning: While there are advantages to beginning each term with a new batch of students, educators fall into the trap of wondering why, after teaching the same information and skills for so long, these students just don’t “get it.”  Also, we see our students for limited periods and, unless we have the pleasure of observing our students over four years, we do not see the results of the educational seeds we plant. Problem students: Those of our students who are needy, disruptive, or who have severe problems to work through take up a lot of our time.  Encounters with such students can take the energy out of a class, turning it into something to dread instead of something to be excited about. Public stereotypes: Who of us have not experienced the dismissal of our work from other professionals?  They are convinced we don’t work hard, have long vacations, and coast because of tenure.  They do not understand the truth of our profession—that a job that is not nine to five means endless work. Income: We don’t enter education to get rich.  Our income often necessitates taking on extra classes or outside work, perpetuating the cycle of burnout.

 

Your specific job:

 

Course loads and overloads: Many of our colleagues teach four courses per semester, are expected to serve on college or university committees, take assigned work of the departments, advise students, and are expected to publish.  There’s also pressure to take on overload courses in some departments where hiring has not kept up with enrollment growth. Committees and boundaries: Although they meet relatively infrequently, committee work can also demand preparation and additional tasks to be completed outside meeting times.  Committee work, like grading, research, and course preparation, will often take as much time as you’re willing to give it. Politics: While politics are a way of life on any job, they can seem particularly complicated in the world of academe.  Difficult politics in a department, or in one’s interaction with administration, can make for a chronically stressful work environment. Poor relationships with specific colleagues: Like problem students, difficult colleagues can become the focus of our interactions.  And, of course, sometimes we can be the difficult colleague, causing problems for those around us.  Educators experiencing burnout are good candidates for being difficult colleagues. WE WELCOME YOUR COMMENTS, FEEDBACK AND GUEST POST SUBMISSIONS.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

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###

SC 190 THE SPECIFIC CAUSES OF BURNOUT IN EDUCATORS 1

 



37. SC 189 Introducing Educator Burnout and its Causes
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 25.63Mb)

Description:

SC 189 Introducing Educator Burnout and its Causes

 

We’re basing our podcasts on an application of Dr. Dike Drummond’s book, Stop Physician Burnout:  What to Do When Working Harder Isn’t Working.  Dr. Drummond was a successful family physician, working his dream job in a dream location, when he realized he could not continue.  His burnout was so severe that he walked away from the practice of medicine, and now dedicates his time to helping doctors avoid burnout and find meaning and satisfaction in their profession.

Unfortunately, most of the ideas and observations Dr. Drummond presents are also present in higher education.  Our task will be to apply what fits to the educator’s world, and to offer some discipline-specific observations as well.

Stress and burnout are not the same.  Stress is temporary and can be motivating, while burnout is a chronic condition that de-motivates and gets worse over time.  Dr. Drummond identifies three key symptoms of burnout:

Exhaustion—no matter how many breaks you take, exhaustion does not go away. It’s like filling up your tank in the gas station, and while driving away, realizing your tank is still registering “empty.” Depersonalization—the feeling of just wanting to get through your work uninterrupted by students, colleagues, and administration. The stages of depersonalization are venting, sarcasm, cynicism, and “compassion fatigue.”  Compassion fatigue is the point of knowing that you should care about the students and co-workers around you, but you just don’t have anything left to give. Hopelessness—feelings of no longer having a purpose in your work, or of not making a difference. WE WELCOME YOUR COMMENTS, FEEDBACK AND GUEST POST SUBMISSIONS.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

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###

SC 189 INTRODUCING EDUCATOR BURNOUT AND ITS CAUSES

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.





 



38. SC 188 Text Books
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 18.26Mb)

Description:

How we can help our students with textbooks. 

 

Our students are not known for being the best textbook readers.

THE NATURE OF TEXTBOOKS IN HIGHER EDUCATION TODAY. Textbooks are sometimes prohibitively expensive. Students can’t afford the required books. Student: “I can get another version of the textbook cheeper!” Disaster. Student: “My textbook didn’t arrive yet!” Meaning: “It is their fault.” HOW WE CAN HELP OUR STUDENTS UNDERSTAND HOW IMPORTANT THE TEXT BOOKS AND READING THEM ARE FOR THEIR SUCCESS. Tell your students how important and critical it is that they get the textbook immediately. Professor: “How many of you are interested in getting an “A” in the class? Please raise your hand.” Lots of hands go up! Professor:  “Great! You need to buy the book, today.” I am not guaranteeing you an “A,” but I am saying that won’t get an “A” unless you buy the book.” We can order an instructor copy and put it on reserve in the library. We can gently suggest to our students that they share a textbook. Given the right situation and maturity level, sharing a textbook can work. Make sure your assignments are actually using the readings in the textbooks. Student: “They made me buy the textbook for $300. and we didn’t even use it!” In week two or three say: “How many of you have the book?”

 

Next week: Introduction to the series: The Causes of Burnout for Educators.

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

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###

SC 188 TEXTBOOKS

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.





 



39. SC 187 Meetings - Meetings - Meetings!
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 18.40Mb)

Description:

How we can thrive and survive - meetings.

Notes from our podcast.

What makes a meeting bad, good, and recommendations. Meetings are part of our lives, either as the organizer or attendee. Bad meetings are meetings that run long. Meetings should not run more than 30 minutes. Causes of a bad meeting: A poorly established agenda Lack of leadership The tendency of people to talk to much How do you know when you are in a good meeting? The time goes by quickly There is a purpose to the meeting The meeting ends when you are done with the agenda A meeting should only exist if there is reason for the personnel to interact with a topic. Do not bring people together to inform them. Colleagues should not be allowed to speak endlessly. Recommendations... You can set time limits on the agenda items. Recognize that you can't control the behavior of others, but you can control your own. Think about what you want to say and say it concisely.  If a meeting is wandering off topic, you can bring everyone back to focus by stating where we are and where we need to be.

Next week: Buying and Reading Books

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

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###

SC 187 Meetings - Meetings - Meetings!

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.





 

40. SC 186 Caring for First Generation College Students
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 17.19Mb)

Description:

 

How we can welcome our newest college students...

Notes from our podcast.

Statistics tell us that the population of students who are first in their families to attend college is growing. Families want their kids to get better jobs than they have and see a college education as the answer. Families often don't understand what a college experience will be like for their kids. At David's university, 44% of the student population are first time college students. Wow! These students are pioneers in their families. Parents may have unrealistic expectation for their kids and apply unneccessary pressure. Independance and Responsibility... The notion of a syllabus and assignments may cause great fear for them. Moreover, they may be embarrassed about asking too many questions. We need to teach and encourage these students more than others because they have no one at home who understands the college journey. We need to help them to understand the landscape. Recommendations... Have your university create a website of resources for first generation students and their parents, possibly available in multiple languages. Get to know who these students are in your classes. Recognize that these students need extra special care. Let your students know that okay to "not get it all the time."

Next week: Meetings - Meetings - Meetings!

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

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###

SC 186 Caring for First Generation College Students

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.





 



41. SC 185 Welcoming New Students
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 18.46Mb)

Description: HOW WE CAN WELCOME OUR NEWEST COLLEGE STUDENTS… We can identify who they are by asking for a show of hands or asking them to complete a survey. Help your students understand what “college behavior” is and what you expect. This is not a continuation of high school. Very early in the semester, our students will either sink or swim, now is the time to offer help. SUGGESTIONS: At the beginning of your class, offer to help anyone who might need it. As the semester progress, explain what normally happens during each week of the term. The first semester can be a dangerous time for new students, we don’t wan’t it to be their last. Explaining what academic probation really means can be a much needed wake up call. Remind students when class starts. There are no bells, like they had in high school. Remind your students about your office hours. Take your lunch in a place where your students are eating too. Just being available in a casual place can create an opportunity for an important talk about the college experience.

Next week: Helping First Time College Students

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

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###

SC 185 WELCOMING NEW STUDENTS

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.





 



42. SC 184 Welcoming New Colleagues
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 13.75Mb)

Description: We celebrate people when they are leaving, 
but not necessarily when they are arriving. 

We're glad you're here! Not, we're glad you were here.

When you are new to a college... Being a faculty member at a new place is stressful. In fact, the entire new semester is stressful. How we can help our newest colleagues. Introduce yourself to a new person and offer to help. "I can be a resource for you." Recall what it was like when you were new. What could have helped you? Don't give them extra things to do. Discourage them from volunteering for extra work. We want a first year person to concentrate on teaching. If they were the second choice for the job, don't tell them! Invite them to lunch!

Next week: Welcoming New Students

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 



43. SC 183 Learning Management Systems
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 18.12Mb)

Description:

The Professor as Presenter – Learning Management Systems

  PREPARATION IS KEY David interviewed a number of professors at an online university and discovered that for each online class, the professors were paid for 300 hours to prepare their course. Switching to a learning management system overnight is crazy! TIPS Be attentive to your time in addition to your students time. It is not wise for you to be online and available 24 /7. Spend large amounts of time setting up your course online and making certain that it is working, 100% in all areas. Don’t assume that your current students, in an online class, are the only students seeing the exam as it becomes easy for them to share. Our students today are very comfortable using these learning management systems. Use your management system as your personal assistant. Discover how the software can enable you to teach in new and innovative ways to improve learning for your students.

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

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###

SC 183 LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.





 



44. SC 182 How We Use Media
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 16.36Mb)

Description:

The Professor as Presenter – How We Use Media

  USE OF MEDIA What are we putting up onto the screen in the classroom? Our students are used to having control of their screens – now we are in control of the content. Our students consume more media in a week than we most likely did in 6 months at their age. TIPS Just because the media is available, by no means do we have to use it in the classroom. Why spend the time in class “showing,” when you can spend the time in class, “discussing?” Make it clear to your class how you are going to be using media and what you expect them to do while the media is being shown. Daniel doesn’t use a TED TALK as content, rather it is an introduction to the content. RESOURCES Our colleague and friend, Bonnie  Stachowiak recommends these industry best resources your creation of slides. Presentation Zen: Simple Ideas on Presentation Design and Delivery, by Garr Reynolds Slide:ology: The Art and Science of Creating Great Presentations, by Nancy Duarte

We recommend the resources produced by Bonnie on her website: Teaching in Higher Ed.

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

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###

SC 182 USE OF MEDIA

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.





UPCOMING TOPIC IN THIS SERIES: OUTSIDE OF CLASS EXTENSIONS Learning management systems have become an important part of the learning experience. These computer networks are expanding the space of the classroom.

45. SC 181 How Do We Sound to our Students?
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 17.86Mb)

Description:

THE AUDIENCE IS LISTENING

Daniel tells a story about a teacher who’s tone of voice was always full of anger. (Must Listen)

How do our students interpret how we are sounding? We can learn a lot from observing actors who specialize in evoking emotions in an audience by the way their voices sound. As professors, we want our students to think a certain way.

When David teaches his safety lecture, he is dead serious. 

Dropping into a parental teacher mode when our students have not performed to our expectations can be very effective. Always strive to connect with your class / audience.

Professors talking to themselves!

We can be a legend in our own minds! We don’t want to exclude our students from our class!

How annoying!

Be aware of verbal patterns that may be driving your students crazy. Because of our education and experience, we can use terms that our students have no idea what we are talking about. Give them permission to interrupt you.

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

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###

SC 181 HOW DO WE SOUND TO OUR STUDENTS?

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.





UPCOMING TOPICS IN THIS SERIES: USE OF MEDIA What are we putting up onto the screen in the classroom? Our students are used to having control of their screens – now we are in control of the content. Our students consume more media in a week than we most likely did in 6 months at their age. OUTSIDE OF CLASS EXTENSIONS Learning management systems have become an important part of the learning experience. These computer networks are expanding the space of the classroom.

46. SC 180 Presentation Materials
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 16.76Mb)

Description:

The Professor as Presenter – Presentation Materials
This podcast was recorded on August 5, 2016.

– TOPICS DISCUSSED IN THE PODCAST – PRESENTATION MATERIELS Are we prepared? Do we look prepared? Are we interesting and engaging or do we sound like a textbook? Are our topics appropriate for the form of an in class lecture?  

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~



47. SC 179 Attitude
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 17.01Mb)

Description:

The Professor as Presenter – Attitude

– TOPICS DISCUSSED IN THE PODCAST – ATTITUDE What is our attitude? What is our perceived attitude by our students? Are we excited and ready to go? Are we self–confident or self–doubting?  

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

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###

SC 179 ATTITUDE

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.





UPCOMING TOPICS IN THIS SERIES: MATERIEL Are we prepared? Do we look prepared? How is the pace of the class? Am I rushed? Do I finish 15 minutes early? Are we interesting and engaging or do we sound like a textbook? Are our topics appropriate for the form of an in class lecture? SPEECH How is our language, sound, tone, boredom factor. How do we sound to our students? Our students are experts at hearing people lecture. USE OF MEDIA What are we putting up onto the screen in the classroom? Our students are used to having control of their screens – now we are in control of the content. Our students consume more media in a week than we most likely did in 6 months at their age. OUTSIDE OF CLASS EXTENSIONS Learning management systems have become an important part of the learning experience. These computer networks are expanding the space of the classroom.

48. SC 178 Are You Lookin' at Me?
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 17.86Mb)

Description:

The Professor as Presenter – Physical Appearance
This podcast was recorded on July 20, 2016 in a gazebo crawling with ants!

WHAT ARE OUR STUDENTS SEEING? PHYSICAL What do our students see when we walk into the room? What do we look like and what does that say about us?

(This can also be an endless source of entertainment for our students!)

OUR HUMANNESS: Students make certain assumptions when we walk into the room: Will they understand me? Will they relate to me? Is there a generation gap? Oh, they are young – or old! Does this equate to our experience or not? Students are looking at and analyzing us: Does this person take care of themselves? Are they short or tall? Be aware that students are making judgements about us. The classroom is like a T.V., they are watching and we are the only thing on. Are we professors being viewed as entertainment? Are we professors being viewed as edu–tainment?

We want our students to move away from what we look like
and think about what we are talking about.

OUR PROFESSIONAL ATTIRE: What are we wearing? Is there a professor dress code? Is our approach to be more dressy than our students, to become more serious? Is our approach to dress more like our students, to relate to them better? WHAT ARE WE CARRYING WHEN WE WALK INTO THE ROOM?: What does what we bring with us say about us? A bag on wheels, a leather briefcase, a backpack? What we carry needs to speak of “organization”. OUR MANNERISMS: What do we do, that we don’t know we are doing? What mannerisms can enhance or distract from our teaching? Ask someone to video record you teaching a class. Lock your office door. Get a strong Venti Starbucks Flat White. Watch the video recording.

Are we too much of the focus for our students? 

Are we getting in the way of the learning? 

The focus should be on the learning and not on us.

 

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

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49. SC 177 Proféssormon GO
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 17.78Mb)

Description:

In honor of the Pokémon GO craze that is sweeping the nation, we feature Proféssormon in the episode.   

Image Credit

The Professor as Presenter - Introduction To Our New Series
This podcast was recorded on July 13, 2016 in Sunny Southern California USA

Using the "Backwards Course Design" approach - What are asking the question: What our students experiencing? What are our students seeing? Us, each other, the room, what we present, and of course – what's on their smartphones or outside the window. What are our students hearing? Us, each other, and what we present in an audible form.  What are our students feeling? What are their emotions? What emotions are we guiding them to experience? What are our students thinking and learning? This is where it all comes together. When we get up in front of the classroom we may be thinking: How do I look? How do I sound?

Our "Student Caring" approach is: The audience (Our students) comes first. In this new series we are going to focus on how to get into the heads of your students.

TOPICS IN THE NEW PODCAST SERIES PHYSICAL What do our students see when we walk into the room? What do we look like and what does that say about us? This can also be an endless source of entertainment for our students! ATTITUDE What is our attitude? What is our perceived attitude by our students? Are we excited and ready to go? Are we self–confident or self–doubting? MATERIEL Are we prepared? Do we look prepared? How is the pace of the class? Am I rushed? Do I finish 15 minutes early? Are we interesting and engaging or do we sound like a textbook? Are our topics appropriate for the form of an in class lecture? SPEECH How is our language, sound, tone, boredom factor. How do we sound to our students? Our students are experts at hearing people lecture. USE OF MEDIA What are we putting up onto the screen in the classroom? Our students are used to having control of their screens - now we are in control of the content. Our students consume more media in a week than we most likely did in 6 months at their age. OUTSIDE OF CLASS EXTENSIONS Learning management systems have become an important part of the learning experience. These computer networks are expanding the space of the classroom.

 

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

Click this Link to Listen on Stitcher Smart Radio

Click this Link to Subscribe via Google Play

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

###

SC 177 Proféssormon GO

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.





 



50. SC 176 Faculty Development
http://studentcaring.com/podca... download (audio/mpeg, 13.55Mb)

Description:

In this podcast we are cheerleaders for your faculty development.

This podcast was recorded on July 1, 2016 in Irvine, California USA
Happy New Fiscal Year!

DEVELOPING OUR SKILLS AS FACULTY: There’s nothing like a good conference! We look to learn how to improve our skills. Conference selection: A wonderful location! A conference that is well funded and offers top speakers. Identifying a time that works with our academic schedule. Take a look at bringing a speaker to your campus to conduct a seminar. This can benefit an entire campus of faculty.

Please share your favorite conference with us and we’ll share them with everyone. david@studentcaring.com

Attending international conferences can open your eyes to teaching techniques that you might be aware of in your country.

Now that budgets are available for the new year, this is a good time to request funds to travel during the upcoming academic year.

 

 

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David