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Podcast title Love Your Work
Website URL http://kadavy.net/blog/archive...
Description Reconnect with the most powerful fuel of all – the fuel of loving your work. Best-selling author and award-winning designer David Kadavy helps you make it as a creative entrepreneur. Find your creative voice, cultivate the mindset you need to succeed, and be the first to capitalize on new opportunities to make a living making your art. Every Thursday, David presents either a guest or his own learnings from his decade-plus career as a creative entrepreneur. Hear from titans of industry like former AOL CEO Steve Case. Hear from best-selling authors like Seth Godin and James Altucher. Hear from scientists, creators from dancers to a chef to a Hollywood set designer, and visionaries on the cutting edge of creative monetization – whether that's self publishing or blockchain technology. Find out why Wall Street Journal best-selling author Jeff Goins says, "David is an underrated writer and thinker. In an age of instant publication, he puts time, effort and great thought into the content and work he shares with the world." Find out why Basecamp CEO Jason Fried says David has "really good, deep questions, and original questions." Subscribe to Love Your Work today so you never miss a dose of the inspiration and motivation you need to unleash the creator you already know you are, deep inside.
Updated Wed, 13 Nov 2019 10:19:37 +0000
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Episodes

1. 203. Dan Ariely: Gamble With Your Time. Make Amazing Decisions.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/d... download (audio/mpeg, 33.43Mb)

Description:

Dan Ariely (@danariely) has more opportunities than he knows what to do with. As a James B. Duke professor of Psychology and Behavioral Economics at Duke University and author of New York Times best-selling books, such as Predictably Irrational, he has lots of demands on his time.

Dan has to say “no” to a lot of opportunities that don’t have a clear payoff. But, surprisingly, he also says “no” to a lot of opportunities that do have a clear payoff.

That’s because, as Dan tells us in this conversation, he gambles with his time. He intentionally does some small amount of things that don’t have a clear payoff. In order to have the space and time for those gambles, he needs to say “no” to some sure bets.

In this episode, we’ll learn more about how Dan gambles with his time. We’ll also learn:

How did “gambling” with his time lead Dan to publish his exciting new graphic novel, Amazing Decisions: The Illustrated Guide to Improving Business Deals and Family Meals? The creative process for Dan’s new graphic novel is a big departure from that of his research papers and books. How did he navigate the uncertainty when collaborating with an artist? With everything Dan knows about human behavior, how does he design his habits, rituals and routines to optimize creative output and spark motivation?

This isn’t the typical conversation with the living legend of behavioral science, Dan Ariely. If you want to know more about his groundbreaking work on irrationality, check out our first conversation on episode 51.

A quick note here: Dan and I talk about “Timeful” a number of times throughout this conversation. If you’re not familiar, Timeful was a productivity app that Dan and I collaborated on. It later sold to Google and some of the Timeful features are integrated into Google Calendar.

Our Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondayss

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Facebook Messenger Support the show on Patreon

Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »

 

 

Sponsors

https://offgridmindfulness.com
https://honeybook.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/dan-ariely/



2. 202. My Income Report (Patreon Preview)
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/i... download (audio/mpeg, 32.01Mb)

Description:

Over the past four years, I’ve been trying to “make it” as a creator. Yes, I was on my own for another eight years before that, but this past four years has been when I really doubled down on creating. To make the things I create not just a marketing tactic for some other thing. For the creations themselves to be the thing.

Each month for the past two years of this journey, I’ve been reporting my income on my blog, kadavy.net. Sometimes, it’s been pretty embarrassing. These aren’t your usual income reports, where someone reports making six or seven figures in a single month. These are the income reports of a creator struggling to make it.

This week, I’d like to give you a preview. This is a preview of something you get at some levels of Patreon backing. An audio version of my income report, delivered right to your favorite podcast app through your own private RSS feed.

These income reports are where I think out loud about why I do one thing, or why I don’t do another thing. Hear how I build this business. Hear the exact thinking behind my decision-making, as it happens.

This is the income report for August of this year. By the time you hear this, the income report for September will be out, too. If you’d like to hear it, just go to patreon.com/kadavy, and look for the proper backing level. I would appreciate your support so much.

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Facebook Messenger Support the show on Patreon

Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/income-report-patreon-preview/ 



3. 201. Change Your Space, Change Your Mind: Architect Donald M. Rattner
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/d... download (audio/mpeg, 42.60Mb)

Description:

Donald M. Rattner (@donaldrattner) is an architect, and author of My Creative Space: How to Design Your Home to Stimulate Ideas and Spark Innovation.

I’ve talked a lot on this podcast about matching your work to your mental state. If you’re in the mood to do the work you’re doing, everything is going to be easier. But you can also match your mental state to the work. You can change your mental state so the work you need to be doing gets done.

One powerful way to change your mental state is to change your surroundings. If you design your space to think more creatively, for example, you’ll do better creative work.

In My Creative Space, Donald draws upon mountains of research from the field of environmental psychology, to show you how to change your space to change your creativity.

In this conversation, you’ll learn:

How has the field of environmental psychology shown how the spaces where you work can change everything from your thinking to your physiology? Research shows that the optimal light level for creativity is 150 lux, and the optimal noise level for creativity is 70 dB. Just how bright and loud is that, and why does it work? Travel posters – especially vintage travel posters – may help you think more creatively. Donald explains why – when it comes to creativity – “construal level theory” (something you might remember from my conversation with David Rock) favors things far away in distance and time.

This conversation is packed with knowledge, and so is Donald’s book.

Image: The Moneylender and His Wife, Quentin Massy

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Facebook Messenger Support the show on Patreon

Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »

 

 

Sponsors

https://kadavy.net/motivation

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/donald-m-rattner/



4. 200. SPECIAL 200th EPISODE! How to “Make It”
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/2... download (audio/mpeg, 24.47Mb)

Description:

If you had asked me when I first started Love Your Work why I was doing it, I don’t think I could have given you a straight answer. I simply felt compelled to create a podcast. Sometimes it’s through the act of creation that we discover what it is that we’re creating.

This is a special 200th episode of Love Your Work. Over the past four years, I’ve been on my own creative journey in making this show. Today I want to reflect on that journey – share what I’ve learned along the way, and hopefully that will reflect some of what you’ve learned.

I didn’t know for sure why I was starting Love Your Work when I first started, but if you were to ask me NOW why I started Love Your Work, I’d tell you that it’s because I was struggling with a conflict. It’s a conflict that you might struggle with yourself.

On one side of the conflict is who you are expected to be. On the other side of the conflict is who you really are. The process of self-actualization – the process of “making it”, is a process of becoming that person who you really are, through your creative work.

Image: The Nap, Gustave Caillebotte

Music in this episode by MacLeod (incompetech.com), licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License: "Perspectives", "Nowhere Land", "Satiate Strings", "Inspired", "Immersed", and "Prelude and Action".

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Facebook Messenger Support the show on Patreon

Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/200th-episode/



5. 199. Ultralearning: Scott H. Young
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/s... download (audio/mpeg, 44.07Mb)

Description:

Scott H. Young (@scotthyoung) is best known for learning the entire MIT Computer Science curriculum, on his own, in only a year. He did it through “ultralearning” It’s a way of organizing your learning so each moment you spend learning is much more effective than it would be otherwise.

If you’re like me, you love to learn new things. If you’re like me, you’d also like to learn more in a shorter amount of time. In Ultralearning, Scott shares how to break down learning projects into their component parts, and how to choose the most effective ways of learning each of those individual parts.

In this conversation, you’ll learn about:

How can “meta learning” – or planning your learning projects – make the process more enjoyable, and prevent burnout and procrastination? Learn why when you feel like you’re learning more, you may actually be learning less. Which is right for you? Free recall, or repeated review? If you’re like me, the term “ultralearning” may sound a little exhausting. Learn how you can apply ultralearning principles to even the most casual learning projects.

You can use ultralearning principles to learn a new language, learn to dance, or to get more bang for your career-building buck.

Thanks for sharing my work!

On Twitter, @martinstellar, @DaveCohencomedy, @kosherjellyfish, @mischievousmali. On Instagram, @alexandbooks_, @icoknick, @nathan.guitar. Elsewhere, thank you to Al Chen for building the todos by mental state Coda template, and Mavericks Thoughts for including me in the article, How 10 Top Writers on Medium Start Their Day.

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Facebook Messenger Support the show on Patreon

Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »

 

 

Sponsors

http://linkedin.com/loveyourwork
https://kadavy.net/motivation

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/scott-h-young/



6. 198. Don't "Invest" in a House: Invest in Yourself
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/s... download (audio/mpeg, 8.14Mb)

Description:

 

If you’re going to get an edge, you have to be aware that the prevailing wisdom is almost always wrong. You have to know when to go against that wisdom.

One place I’m glad that I went against the prevailing wisdom is in my decision to not buy a house – especially when I was in my early twenties. The prevailing wisdom was that a house was “the best investment you can make.” Instead, I decided to invest in myself.

This post is from more than ten years ago, and it’s talking about decisions I made fifteen years ago, which makes this a fun episode for two reasons.

One, I wish I would have had more confidence in my point of view earlier on. I was definitely onto something. I’m always struggling to trust my instincts, and this is a good reminder that my instincts have been right at least one time in the past.

Two, I’m reading this as it was written ten years ago. Notice that my writing style has gotten much better – my writing was definitely not as audio-friendly, but I’ll be reading it as it was written. I wasn’t a good “prompt talker” as I call it. Lots more ten-cent words in this one.

Image: The Open Window, Juan Gris

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Facebook Messenger Support the show on Patreon

Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/self-investment-podcast/



7. 197. Annie Duke: Good Decisions. Good Outcomes.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/a... download (audio/mpeg, 35.54Mb)

Description:

When something bad happens, it’s tempting to think that you made a bad decision. But the quality of your decision making doesn’t always align with the quality of your outcomes.

Sometimes you make a good decision, and you have a bad outcome. Even more dangerous, sometimes you make a bad decision, and have a good outcome (you'll learn why).

Annie Duke (@AnnieDuke) is a former professional poker player, and a decision strategist. She's dedicated to improving decision-making skills around the world amongst adults and children. She’s author of Thinking in Bets: Making Smarter Decisions When You Don't Have All the Facts.

In this conversation, you’ll learn:

We often think of life as like a game of chess. Why is it actually more like a game of poker? How do we separate luck from skill? Learn the most common mental error people make that holds them back from ever learning to make better decisions. Why do strong opinions make you dumber? Learn how to overcome “motivated reasoning” to make more accurate predictions, and better decisions. New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Facebook Messenger Support the show on Patreon

Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »

 

 

 Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/annie-duke/



8. 196. Live an Antifragile Life
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Description:

We hate to lose. But if we don’t take risks in life, we never win. The more we protect ourselves from loss, the more we stagnate.

Like economist Tyler Cowen told me, if you want to be “dynamic,” you have to develop a thick skin.

I’ve been thinking more and more lately about the importance of having a thick skin. The importance of being – Antifragile. I’ll tell you more about it in this week’s episode.

Image from: Head of a skeleton with a burning cigarette, Vincent Van Gogh

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Facebook Messenger Support the show on Patreon

Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/antifragile-life-podcast/



9. 195. Nir Eyal: Be Indistractable
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/n... download (audio/mpeg, 41.26Mb)

Description:

What if your smartphone didn’t distract you? What if your focus couldn’t be shaken by social media, by the latest news story, or even by your coworkers?

What if you could be indistractable? Imagine what you could accomplish.

Nir Eyal's (@nireyal) new book will help you do just that. Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life will lead you away from dis-traction, so you can get traction.

You may remember Nir being on Love Your Work a couple of times before. We talked about the societal implications of distracting technology more than three years ago, on episode 21. And now he’s back to show you how to fight back distractions – whatever the source.

In this conversation, you’ll learn:

Nir wrote the Bible on building habit-forming products: Hooked is a Wall Street Journal best-seller. So why would he also write the book on how to avoid being distracted by these products? How can you reimagine distraction to short-circuit it at its source? Nir helps you redesign your triggers, your task, and your temperament. Why is the myth of multitasking a myth in itself? Nir shows you how “multichannel multitasking” can help you do two things at once while being as focused as ever.

Links Nir mentions:

Schedule-maker tool Distraction guide

Full disclosure, Nir is a book marketing client of mine. I consulted for him on some marketing tasks for this book, Indistractable. Of course, I rarely take clients, and I only did so because I respect Nir so much as an author and a thinker, and because I loved the book!

Thanks for sharing my work!

On Twitter, @noidentity_uk, @MPozdnev, and @JeffPossiel. On Instagram, @tomjepsoncreative.

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Facebook Messenger Support the show on Patreon

Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/nir-eyal-indistractable/



10. 194. Front Burner Creativity, Back Burner Creativity
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/f... download (audio/mpeg, 9.15Mb)

Description:

To make it as a creative, you need to make the most of very limited resources. Your most valuable resource as a creative is your creative energy. You only have so much creative energy, but if you use that energy wisely, you can be leaps and bounds more productive than you could be otherwise.

To manage your creative energy well, be intentional about how you use it. One way to be intentional about how you use your creative energy is to categorize and label different types of creative energy.

Today, I introduce two types of creative energy. “Front burner” creativity, and “back burner” creativity. If you think of your creative energy in terms of “front burner” and “back burner,” you can have more creative output on your smaller projects, while still tackling those bigger projects – all without procrastinating or burning out.

I’ll tell you more in this week’s episode.

Image: Guitar and Music Paper, Juan Gris

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Facebook Messenger Support the show on Patreon

Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/front-burner-creativity/



11. 193. Fire Me, I Beg You – Robbie Abed
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/r... download (audio/mpeg, 48.39Mb)

Description:

Robbie Abed (@robbieab) is author of Fire Me I Beg You: Quit Your Miserable Job (Without Risking it All). Robbie is also one of the early influencers on LinkedIn's publishing platform, he’s had over 500 coffee meetings, and he's one of the key catalysts – along with James Altucher – behind why this podcast exists at all. (You’ll hear the story.)

How would you feel if you got fired today? If the answer is “relieved,” you should re-think your job.

I took a short visit to Chicago, and sat down with longtime friend Robbie Abed. In this conversation, you’ll learn;

Thinking about quitting your job? What’s one question you should ask yourself to know if you should pull the trigger? How do you quit your job without committing career suicide? Robbie says “Never lie on your resume, but lie like hell in your exit interview.” Find out why. New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Facebook Messenger Support the show on Patreon

Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »



12. 192. Choose Problems Worth Having
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/p... download (audio/mpeg, 7.79Mb)

Description:

Have you ever wondered to yourself: How the the hell did I end up in this situation?

I asked myself this question once. I was changing my clothes in the bathroom of a filthy Fuck My Life laundromat in Chicago.

It was a terrible situation. But I learned an important lesson. I’ll tell you about it in this week’s episode.

Image from: A Bar at the Foiles-Bergére, Edouard Manet

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

Listener Showcase

This week, we’re featuring Luke Freeman of positly.com. Positly.com is a platform for recruiting and managing research participants.

Sign up to be featured at kadavy.net/showcase

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Facebook Messenger Support the show on Patreon

Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/problems-worth-having-podcast/



13. 191. Easy Money. Hard Time. Ryan Evans.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/r... download (audio/mpeg, 41.48Mb)

Description:

Ryan Evans (@ryanevans) wanted to make easy money. Growing up on a pig farm, Ryan was used to making little money for lots of hard work.

But Ryan would soon learn an important lesson about the dangers of easy money.

This is, in my opinion, the most powerful conversation I’ve had on the show yet. In it, we’ll talk about:

Are there good ways to make money, and bad ways to make money? Ryan’s hard lesson gives him a unique perspective that few people have. Hear the story of what it’s like to get investigated by the SEC for insider trading. What’s it like to serve hard time for making easy money? If you’ve ever wondered what federal prison was like, Ryan will tell you.

I had to cut a third of this conversation out, in order to fit our production budget. We pay by the minute for editing, so there isn’t room for the whole thing. Patreon supporters got access to the raw uncut conversation weeks ago, delivered straight to their favorite podcast apps. Support Love Your Work on Patreon to hear the whole thing, and get other goodies in the process. Join at patreon.com/kadavy.

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Facebook Messenger Support the show on Patreon

Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »



14. 190. The Variable Money Value of Time
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/v... download (audio/mpeg, 9.53Mb)

Description:

You may have heard that you should assign yourself an “aspirational hourly rate.” That you should tell yourself you’re worth, say, $300 an hour; and if you can spend $300 to save yourself an hour, you should do so.

That’s a powerful idea for making the most of your time and energy, but is all of your time equally valuable? In this week’s essay, I propose a variable money value for your time.

Image: Glass and Checkerboard, Juan Gris

Thanks for sharing my work!

On Twitter, @EvryLovelyThing and @tchassakamga. On Instagram, tomjepsoncreative of The Sideman Designer podcast.

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Facebook Messenger Support the show on Patreon

Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/variable-money-value-time/



15. 189. 80,000 Hours to Change the World – Rob Wiblin
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/r... download (audio/mpeg, 91.29Mb)

Description:

Rob Wiblin (@robertwiblin) is the Director of Research at an organization called 80,000 Hours, and host of the 80,000 Hours Podcast. 80,000 hours being the amount of hours you will spend working in a typical career. 80,000 Hours is dedicated to finding out just how effective various careers are, and who is suited for those careers.

We all want the work we do to matter. But how do we really know whether the work we do does matter?

The foundation of 80,000 Hours is a philosophy called Effective Altruism. The EA community asks tough questions about what are the most important issues facing humanity, and how best to address those issues. EA tends to come up with counterintuitive conclusions that go against most people’s first instincts.

You’re going to hear some of those counterintuitive conclusions. You’re also going to learn:

Why did Rob insist on having a much longer conversation than the typical one-hour conversation you hear here on Love Your Work? He has data to back up his suggestion. Why should you stop listening to your gut instincts about what actions have an impact? Following the research can increase your impact a thousand times over. Why are the highest-profile issues some of the last issues you should be giving your attention to? Rob provides a framework for making the most of your money, time, and attention.

This is a much longer conversation than usual. I’d like to thank Rob Wiblin and 80,000 Hours for offering to cover the extra production costs over our usual shorter conversations. We pay by the minute, and they were happy to chip in to make this conversation more in-depth. You’ll find out why early on in the conversation.

Links mentioned The benefits (and lack of harm) of nicotine Nature.com: Impact of plastic straw ban on oral health advice? Plastic waste inputs from land into the ocean by Jambeck et al,. Science (2015) What you think about landfill and recycling is probably totally wrong by Rob Wiblin Population ethics Population axiology The Non-Identity Problem How many lives does a doctor save?
Simplifying Cluelessness, by Philip Trammell
80,000 Hours Key Ideas New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

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Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/robert-wiblin-interview/

 



16. 188. End the Time Management World. Start the Mind Management World.
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We’re so accustomed to operating in a time management world, we can’t imagine it being any different. We all have our calendars full, and even then we can’t seem to manage it all.

Believe it or not, it wasn’t always this way, and if you want to stay relevant in the coming years, I think you’ll have to learn to operate under a completely different paradigm.

We need to stop thinking so much about how to better manage our time, and start thinking about how to better manage our minds. I’ll tell you more in this week’s episode.

Photo by milan degraeve on Unsplash.

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

Listener Showcase

Vidas Pinkevicius is not only one of our top-contributing Patreon backers, he’s also an organist who draws. Vidas is author of Pinky and Spiky comics. You can check out his work on Steemit.

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Facebook Messenger Support the show on Patreon

Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »

 

Show notes: >http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/mind-management-world-podcast/



17. 187. One Small Step, The Kaizen Way: Dr. Robert Maurer
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Dr. Robert Maurer (@Dr_RobertMaurer) is author of One Small Step Can Change Your Life: The Kaizen Way. He’s also Director of Behavioral Sciences for the Family Practice Residency Program at Santa Monica UCLA Medical Center and a faculty member with the UCLA School of Medicine. In One Small Step, Dr. Maurer shows you how to make really big changes with ridiculously small steps.

I first discovered One Small Step on the Amazon page for my own book, The Heart to Start. Amazon kept showing me that people who bought my book were also buying Robert’s book. After it had been sitting there for week after week, I thought to myself, I’ve gotta see what this is about.

You’ve heard me talk about taking small steps on this podcast, including my episode on how to build good habits with B.J. Fogg. It turns out there’s a name for this practice. The Japanese call it Kaizen.

In this conversation, you’ll learn about:

How do large goals put us into fear mode? Learn about the neuroscience of why we don’t take actions. How can you start doing anything with small steps? You can start an exercise habit simply by standing on a treadmill, or a flossing habit while flossing only one tooth. How did Dr. Maurer himself write his book by committing to only ninety seconds per day of writing? Support the show

Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/robert-maurer-kaizen/



18. 186. Shut Down the Consumer Mind. Fire Up the Creator Mind.
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Description:

Breaking through resistance to be creative is a battle with your own mind. We learned last week from Dr. Robert Lustig about how commerce is set up to hack your mind into a state of constant wanting, wanting, wanting.

But the more you seek satisfaction from the outside world, the harder time you’ll have finding it. That’s why I think you should shut off the consumer mind, and fire up the creator mind.

Photo by Paul Skorupskas on Unsplash

Thanks for sharing my work!

On Instagram, tammylynnmcnabb, and tomjepsoncreative of The Sideman Designer podcast.

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

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Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/creator-mind-podcast/



19. 185. Less Pleasure, More Happiness: Dr. Robert Lustig
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Description:

Dr. Robert Lustig (@RobertLustigMD) is Professor emeritus of Pediatrics, Division of Endocrinology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), where he specializes in the field of neuroendocrinology – in other words, how the brain regulates hormonal activity in the body. His research and clinical practice has focused on childhood obesity and diabetes.

Dr. Lustig believes the food business has hacked our bodies and minds to pursue pleasure instead of happiness, by pushing processed food loaded with sugar. As you’ll see, the way sugar triggers our brain chemistry isn’t a whole lot different from the way technology triggers our brain chemistry, which is relevant to prior discussions I’ve had on the podcast about how technology shapes behavior. Dr. Lustig points to this confusion between pleasure and happiness as having fostered today’s epidemics of addiction and depression.

Getting your creative work out into the world, and finding a way to love your work, both require that you have a healthy relationship with your mind, and your definition of happiness. This is why I was extremely excited to come across Dr. Lustig’s book, The Hacking of the American Mind: The Science Behind the Corporate Takeover of Our Bodies and Brains. It really brought a scientific explanation to much of what I’ve been searching to explain here on Love Your Work over the past few years.

In this conversation, you’ll learn:

Why are pleasure and happiness neurologically different phenomenon? How do we confuse them for one another? How does the pursuit of pleasure reduce your ability to experience pleasure? The more pleasure you pursue, the harder it becomes to be happy. You’ve heard that Coca Cola used to have one addictive substance in it – cocaine. Hear the story Coke doesn’t want you to know about why the original formula had FOUR addictive substances. New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

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Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/robert-lustig-podcast/

#share2steem



20. 184. Strategic Curiosity
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Curiosity is powerful fuel. If you want to make it as a creative, you need to follow things you’re curious about. It’s your best shot at being able to put in the work necessary to succeed.

But curiosity can be so powerful, it can take you off track. In this week’s article, learn how to use curiosity strategically. You can harness the fuel of curiosity while driving toward your goals.

Image by Steve Johnson

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

Listener Showcase

Frafri makes “music for entrepreneurs.” Visit frafri.com to find all of the places you can listen.

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/strategic-curiosity-podcast/



21. 183. Cal Newport: More Good Tech. Less Bad Tech. Digital Minimalism.
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Description:

We’re living in a time of exciting technological innovation. But just because technology can do something for us, doesn’t mean that it should.

Cal Newport is author of the new book Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World. Digital Minimalism is a philosophy of using the power of technology only in the ways it serves us best, while eliminating use of technology in ways it harms us, or even in ways it only has a marginal benefit.

Aside from Digital Minimalism, Cal Newport is an extremely prolific author. He’s written books such as So Good They Can’t Ignore You, Deep Work, and How to Become a Straight-A Student. He’s a tenured computer science professor at Georgetown University.

Cal has accomplished all of this in spite of – or maybe because – he’s never had a single social media account.

This is a fantastic conversation with Cal. He and I overlap a lot in our interests, so I was very eager to discuss with him the implications of technology usage, and also to dig deeper into his relationship with Deep Work. As you know if you listen to Love Your Work regularly, I’m always searching for ways to get more out of my mind, and to maintain a healthy relationship with technology that helps me get more creative work into the world, without distracting me from doing that creative work.

In this conversation, you’ll learn:

How did we all get so addicted to Facebook? For many of us, it was an accident. For Facebook, it was no accident. How do Amish communities survive, despite being surrounded by a world with a rapid pace of technological innovation? It’s all about using technology for its benefits, without damaging the community. Cal goes beyond "Deep Work” to talk about the different “flavors” of Deep Work he uses to power his wildly successful career as both an academic and an author. Links and resources mentioned Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World by Cal Newport Tragedy of the commons Ten arguments for deleting your social media accounts right now by Jaron Lanier Pavlok Mouse Book Club Moleskine Medieval Technology and Social Change by Lynn White Technological instrumentalism Technological determinism Dynamical system Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World by Cal Newport The Hedgehog and The Fox So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love by Cal Newport Cal Newport

Photo Credit: Penny Gray Photography

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative entrepreneur. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Facebook Messenger

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/cal-newport-podcast-interview/



22. 182. Stop Loving Your City
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Description:

If you want to be a master of your craft, you need to be able to see your skills and accomplishments objectively. You need to always be on the lookout for ways you might fool yourself – for ways you might cause yourself to feel as if you have accomplished something, when in fact you have accomplished nothing.

One of the ways you can distort your vision of the truth is by identifying too strongly with the place you live. I talk about it in this week’s article.

Thanks for sharing my work!

Thank you to the Meshed Society Newsletter; to @LivC2012, @rhysbmorgan, and @wes_mister on Twitter; and to @Aliceswalsh and @Maxam1 on Instagram.

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative entrepreneur. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/stop-loving-city-podcast/



23. 181. Feed Your Good Wolf. Eric Zimmer of The One You Feed Podcast on Fighting Heroin Addiction with Creativity.
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Description:

Eric Zimmer (@etzimmer) was living in a van. He had Hepatitis C and weighed 100 pounds. Then he got arrested and lost his job. He was facing up to forty years in jail time. He had a $300-a-day addiction to heroin.

Today, Eric is host of the popular podcast, The One You Feed, which was named one of the best podcasts on iTunes in 2014, and has more than 10 million downloads. The One You Feed is based upon an old parable about a good wolf and a bad wolf at battle inside each of us. The one who wins is the one you feed.

Eric straightened out his life and has overcome addiction. He helps others not only through The One You Feed, but also through behavioral coaching work.

How did Eric go from a $300-a-day heroin addiction to 13 years clean and sober? We’ll find out today.

We’ll also talk about:

The delicate relationship between creative pursuit and self image. How can creativity become a scapegoat for self-destruction, or a vehicle for self improvement? How was Eric able to integrate friendship and his love for music into his podcast? The One You Feed helps him feed his “good wolf."" Why is Eric grateful that he was drawn to heroin? Counterintuitively, the victory of a ""bad wolf” can spring the “good wolf” into action. Links and resources mentioned One You Feed Podcast The Two Wolves parable Keith Richards Kurt Cobain Vincent van Gogh Leonard Cohen Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Arthur Ashe What should be our next Patreon goal?

Take our survey at kadavy.net/goals. Start supporting Love Your Work at patreon.com/kadavy.

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative entrepreneur. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/one-you-feed-podcast-eric-zimmer/



24. 180. Forget Introvert/Extrovert. Are you "Perceiving" or "Judging?"
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Description:

I often have listeners write to me, lamenting that they have “too many interests,” or that they “lack focus.” They’ve been taught to feel ashamed of their curiosity.

It’s interesting, the personality types of “introvert” and “extrovert” get a lot of attention. But I think equally as important is the difference between “perceiver” and “judger.” What is that? Well those hopelessly curious people, they would fall into the perceiver category, and they should stop feeling ashamed about it.

I’ll tell you more in this week’s article.

What should be our next Patreon goal?

Take our survey at kadavy.net/goals. Start supporting Love Your Work at patreon.com/kadavy.

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative entrepreneur. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/perceiving-judging-podcast/



25. 179. Appeal to the 99%: Srdja Popovic, Revolutionary & Author of Blueprint for Revolution
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Description:

Srdja Popovic (@SrdjaPopovic) is a revolutionary. He played a big part in overthrowing Serbian president Slobodan Milošević. He now coaches activists around the world in non-violent resistance techniques, through CANVAS (Center for Applied Nonviolent Action and Strategies).

This may seem out of left field to have a political activist on the show. It’s not meant to be some thinly-veiled political statement. Rather, I think anyone who is trying to get people on board with their message can learn a lot from the techniques of revolutionaries.

I recently read Srdja’s book, Blueprint for Revolution: How to Use Rice Pudding, Lego Men, and Other Nonviolent Techniques to Galvanize Communities, Overthrow Dictators, or Simply Change the World, and was blown away by the inventiveness and deft strategy of the techniques he shared. It’s a fascinating book whether you’re trying to overthrow a dictator, or you’re merely trying to get people to read your blog.

In this conversation, you’ll learn:

We think Rosa Parks’s courageous stand was a spontaneous event. Learn how it was actually a strategic hit, designed for maximum effect. If you’re trying to get people on board with your message, branding is everything. Learn how a movement like Occupy Wall Street missed a golden branding opportunity. Effective activists choose tactics that have the most influence, with the smallest risk. Learn Srdja’s brainstorming techniques for homing in on these tactics. It’s a valuable exercise for any influencer. Links and resources mentioned Blueprint for Revolution: How to Use Rice Pudding, Lego Men, and Other Nonviolent Techniques to Galvanize Communities, Overthrow Dictators, or Simply Change the World by Srdja Popovic Slobodan Miloševic The World’s Greatest Unreported Hyperinflation The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien Otpor! Occupy Movement Democratic Opposition of Serbia Blitzkrieg Multi-level Marketing 198 Methods of Nonviolent Action Gene Sharp Montgomery bus boycott NYU Harvard Kennedy School Colorado College Arab Spring Civil Rights Movement Laughtivism Ghandi Salt March Why Dictators Don’t Like Jokes Toys cannot hold protest because they are not citizens of Russia, officials rule Occupy Wall Street We are the 99% Orange Revolution Milk Harvey Milk James Lawson Sudanese protests Center for Applied Nonviolent Action and Strategies

Image Credit: Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung

What should be our next Patreon goal?

Take our survey at kadavy.net/goals. Start supporting Love Your Work at patreon.com/kadavy.

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative entrepreneur. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/srdja-popovic/



26. 178. Do One Thing Every Day That An Algorithm Didn't Choose For You
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Description:

We live in a world rich with information, and algorithms help us find the things that fit us. Algorithms help us decide what books to buy, what music to listen to, and even who to date.

But are algorithms always a good thing? If they aren’t, how can you be “anti algorithm.” I talked about this concept a little bit with Tyler Cowen back on episode 155. Now I’ll expand on it.

What should be our next Patreon goal?

Take our survey at kadavy.net/goals.

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative entrepreneur. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/anti-algorithm-podcast/



27. 177. Seth Godin: Who Is It for?
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How do you market something when you don’t know what it is, or who it’s for? If you’re anything like me, you feel driven to create, but it’s only through the process of creation that your vision takes form. It’s only through putting that creation out into the world that you begin to realize what it means.

This makes it a challenge to market your creations. If you don’t know what it is, you don’t know how to sell it. If you don’t know who it’s for, you don’t know how to speak to those people.

I’m honored to have the legendary Seth Godin back on the show. His first appearance was exactly one-hundred episodes ago, on episode 77. My first conversation with Seth proved to be a breakthrough moment for me. The things Seth said to me gave me the courage to self publish The Heart to Start, as well as other, shorter books.

I’m still digesting this conversation, but I think it will prove to be another breakthrough. It helped me answer a lot of questions I had from reading Seth’s most recent book, the instant classic, This is Marketing.

In this conversation, you’ll learn:

What are “status roles,” and how can you use them to help your product spread? Seth will tell you why status is more than just money and materialism. Why is “specific” a kind of bravery? If you don’t know “who it’s for,” you might simply be hiding from a fear of failure. Seth calls me out with very direct advice that will stick with me for the rest of my life. Find out why Seth doesn’t want me to sell out to easy money. Links and resources mentioned This Is Marketing by Seth Godin Paul Cézanne Jackson Pollock Permission Marketing Seth's Blog The Marketing Seminar In search of the minimum viable audience Myers–Briggs Type Indicator Samuel Beckett Waiting for Godot Kickstarter Keith Johnstone Impro: Improvisation and the Theatre by Keith Johnstone The Godfather Breaking Bad Microfinance WaterHealth International Akimbo The Podcast Fellowship J. K. Rowling Harper Lee Earnest Hemingway Purple Cow: Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable by Seth Godin Linchpin: Are You Indispensable? by Seth Godin Free Prize Inside: How to Make a Purple Cow by Seth Godin How blind auditions help orchestras to eliminate gender bias Can 10,000 hours of practice make you an expert? Akimbo - The Big Sort: Why taxonomy matters Akimbo - Interoperability Becoming by Michelle Obama The Martian by Andy Weir The Domino Project altMBA What should be our next Patreon goal?

Take our survey at kadavy.net/goals.

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative entrepreneur. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/seth-godin-podcast-2/



28. NOTE: Sign up for the Summer of Starting
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I'm launching a new email series. Summer of Starting will help you get out of your own way, stop procrastinating, and start creating.

Sign up before May 24th at summerofstarting.com



29. 176. Minimum Creative Dose
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Description:

Big creative projects are daunting. It’s easy to burn out, and procrastinate. The problem is, creative problems don’t get solved in one go.

In medicine, there’s a concept of the “minimum effective dose.” It’s the minimum dose at which the medication will elicit a response. If you follow Tim Ferriss, you hear him mention minimum effective dose often.

You heard about the minimum effective dose of weight training back on episode 160. Now I’m going to tell you about the concept of minimum effective dose, as applied to your creative projects. I call it “Minimum Creative Dose".

What should be our next Patreon goal?

Take our survey at kadavy.net/goals.

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative entrepreneur. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/minimum-creative-dose-podcast/



30. 175. Vincent Van Gogh’s Triumph Over Adversity – Steven Naifeh, Co-Author of Van Gogh: The Life
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Description:

Vincent Van Gogh was a loser and a failure. He failed as an art dealer, and as a preacher. He even got fired and banned from his own family’s business.

On top of it, Van Gogh had terrible health problems. His gums were sore, he was losing weight, and he had a hacking cough. He was also prone to psychotic episodes, during which he was institutionalized for months at a time.

Vincent never really found his place in the world. He died young, at only 37.

I recently read an incredible biography of Van Gogh. By the end, I was left wondering, what can you possibly learn from this tragic life?

Steven Naifeh is co-author if the incredible [Van Gogh: The Life]  (@VanGoghTheLife). It’s a 900-page treasure chronicling the life of an artist who is so revered, tourists bring their relative’s ashes to spread over his gravesite in Auvers, France.

Steven and his co-author and partner Gregory White Smith spent more than a decade compiling Van Gogh’s biography. To do so, they had to sort through mountains of letters and literature from the period of Van Gogh’s life. Since neither of them spoke Dutch, they worked with more than twenty translators and researchers to complete the book.

The result is a Van Gogh biography of unparalleled depth, painting in intricate detail the outer and inner life of Vincent Van Gogh.

In this conversation, you’ll learn:

Most people think Vincent Van Gogh died in obscurity, but that’s not true. Why is it that, as he languished in an asylum, Vincent's work was actually exploding in popularity. Many people also believe that Vincent Van Gogh committed suicide. How did Naifeh and Smith come to change the opinion of even the most studied Van Gogh historians. What can you possibly learn from the tragic success of Vincent Van Gogh? Steven shares insights about what he and his late partner and co-author learned from studying Van Gogh’s life. It’s surprising, and touching. Links and resources mentioned Steven Naifeh Van Gogh: The Life - Book Van Gogh The Life - Website Van Gogh The Life - Instagram Van Gogh The Life - Facebook Claude Monet Jackson Pollock: An American Saga Jackson Pollock - Is he the greatest living painter in the United States? Theo Van Gogh Van Gogh Letters Albert Aurier Article Grave of Vincent and Theo van Gogh The Potato Eaters Van Gogh Museum Paul Gauguin German Expressionism Pierre-Auguste Renoir Georges Seurat A Sunday on La Grande Jatte Camille Pissarro Émile Bernard Paul Signac Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec Salon Paul Cézanne Alfred Sisley The Eight Impressionist Exhibitions, 1874-1886 Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Manic Depression Absinthe Syphilis Syphilis and the use of mercury Gregory White Smith Wheatfield with Crows Tree Roots Museum unconvinced by Van Gogh death theory John Rewald Loving Vincent At Eternity's Gate Don McLean - Vincent ( Starry, Starry Night) Vincent Di Maio NCIS: Provence: The Van Gogh Mystery Luck Unites a Couple for a Lifetime of Great Collaborations Almond Blossom What should be our next Patreon goal?

Take our survey at kadavy.net/goals.

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative entrepreneur. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/vincent-van-gogh-podcast/



31. 174. Introducing Love Mondays ("Things take time")
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Do you want to love Mondays? If you already love Mondays, do you want to keep loving Mondays? I’m launching a new newsletter that will help you do just that.

It’s called Love Mondays, and it’s a weekly boost of inspiration to help you find the mindset to make it as a creative entrepreneur. If you’re already on my email list, you’ve already been enjoying these.

Many of them include one of the more than 11,000 highlights I’ve built up over years of reading about how history’s greatest artists and thinkers have carved out their own unique places in the world.

Others are the gems pulled out of conversations you’ve heard right here on Love Your Work.

Those of you already getting these emails know I told you about how Georgia O’Keeffe decided to quit modeling to double down on art. I’ve told you about how professor Dean Simonton’s work shows that quantity of creative work leads to quality of creative work. I’ve shown you how neuroscientists have discovered that the best predictor of so-called “insight machines” is brain patterns that show a high level of self awareness.

Today, I’m going to give you an insight from comedian Steve Martin. If you ever feel like your big break will never come, this will keep you going.

And if you’d like to get a boost in your inbox every Monday morning, go sign up for the Love Mondays newsletter at kadavy.net/mondays

What should be our next Patreon goal?

Take our survey at kadavy.net/goals.

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative entrepreneur. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/introducing-love-mondays/



32. 173. Austin Kleon: Keep Going
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Description:

Austin Kleon (@austinkleon) woke up one day and realized two things: The world seemed to be filled with more and more anger and distraction every day, and – to make matters worse – consistently doing creative work wasn’t getting any easier.

Austin had already written three New York Times bestselling illustrated books. Millions have already learned to Steal Like an Artist – the title of his first book – and they’d learned to put their work out there with Show Your Work.

Austin wasn’t sure how much more he had in him. That inspired him to write his new book, Keep Going: 10 Ways to Stay Creative in Good Times and Bad.

In this conversation, you’ll learn:

Why making something for yourself is technically making something for someone else. Learn about the many different ways that focusing on your own creative expression can reach others. How can you be a valuable asset to the creators you admire? Austin shares a specific story that shows you why you have more to offer than you might think. What one thing can you do in the morning – or rather, not do – to do your best work yet? Links and resources mentioned Keep Going: 10 Ways to Stay Creative in Good Times and Bad by Austin Kleon Show Your Work! by Austin Kleon Austin Kleon Austin Kleon Newsletter A/B Testing The Revenge of Analog: Real Things and Why They Matter by David Sax Leave A Message Studs Terkel Radio Archive Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do by Studs Terkel Richard Scarry's What Do People Do All Day? by Richard Scarry Honoré de Balzac Seth Godin This is marketing by Seth Godin Leonardo da Vinci by Walter Isaacson Stephen King The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien The Complete Tales of Winnie-The-Pooh by A. A. Milne Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren Newspaper Blackout by Austin Kleon Steal Like an Artist: 10 Things Nobody Told You About Being Creative by Austin Kleon Lynda Barry Dan Chaon Saturday Night Live Five-Timers Club Role Models by John Waters Lost in the Cosmos: The Last Self-Help Book by Walker Percy Walker Percy’s problems of reentry Frankenstein Ryan Holiday Morning Pages What should be our next Patreon goal?

Take our survey at kadavy.net/goals.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/austin-kleon-podcast/



33. 172. Change Your Identity, Change Your Actions
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/i... download (audio/mpeg, 6.10Mb)

Description:

If you do particular actions on a regular basis, you’ll change your identity. For example, if you make it a habit to write every day, you’ll eventually see yourself as a writer.

But it can work the other way around, too. If you change your appearance, you can change your identity. If you change your identity, you can change your actions.

In this week’s episode, I share my own experience of changing my identity, in order to change my actions.

What should be our next Patreon goal?

Take our survey at kadavy.net/goals.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/identity-actions-podcast/



34. 171. David Allen’s Accidental Legacy
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/d... download (audio/mpeg, 36.63Mb)

Description:

David Allen (@gtdguy) has built a legacy. He’s created a system that helps millions of people get more of what they want out of life. Getting Things Done, the book, has sold millions of copies. And there’s an entire cottage industry of GTD apps and consultants, all over the world.

Even if you’ve never read or heard of GTD, you or someone you work with probably operates with “next actions,” and “contexts.”

David and I talked more about the GTD system back in his first appearance on the show on episode 85.

This time, we’ll be talking about David’s accidental legacy. How does somebody create something that spreads like wildfire and changes the culture?

Today, we’ll talk about:

Your day to day actions are guided by meaning on various levels. How can you think about the different levels of what’s meaningful to you, and how can you think about what actions you need to take to make those things happen? Why does David’s screensaver say “let go?” Following a system like GTD may feel like it’s for control freaks, but learn the difference between being in control, and under control. What was the one email David got that made him decide that GTD was ready to scale globally? Links and resources mentioned GTD Getting Things Done Summit Getting Things Done Coaching Programs Merlin Mann 43 Folders Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity by David Allen Franklin Covey VitalSmarts Top Gun Howard Stern Will Smith Robert Downey Jr Julie Flagg GTD Summit Marshall Goldsmith Dan Pink Charles Duhigg Cady Coleman We've reached a new funding goal! We now have detailed show notes, starting with next week's interview episode. Start supporting Love Your Work at patreon.com/kadavy. Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/david-allens-getting-things-done-legacy/



35. 170. No, I'm Not Building a Legacy
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/n... download (audio/mpeg, 6.66Mb)

Description:

Lots of people want to build a “legacy.” They want to be remembered when they’re gone.

It’s a natural product of our fear of death. But is it realistic to want to build a legacy? Is it realistic to believe you can control whether or not you’re remembered? And might aiming to build a legacy prevent you from doing the type of work that builds legacies in the first place?

I examine these questions in this week’s episode.

We've reached a new funding goal! We now have detailed show notes, starting with next week's interview episode. Start supporting Love Your Work at patreon.com/kadavy. Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

https://kadavy.net/motivation

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/no-legacy-podcast/



36. 169. Andrew Warner of Mixergy Does it for Love
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/a... download (audio/mpeg, 48.49Mb)

Description:

To me, Andrew Warner’s (@andrewwarner) Mixergy podcast created the entire category of entrepreneur interview podcasts – a category this podcast here falls within. I started listening to Mixergy something like ten years ago, and it was one of the main podcasts that got my gears turning to eventually start this podcast – after putting it off for years, of course.

Andrew has created over 1,700 interviews and courses with top entrepreneurs. People like Jimmy Wales, Barbara Corcoran, and Paul Graham. He’s known for getting his guests to open up and reveal exact numbers in their businesses. Sometimes I find myself squirming at the direct questions he asks, but it works!

I recently took a trip to San Francisco to be on the Jordan Harbinger Show (look out for my appearance on that show toward the end of the month, I think you’ll like what I prepared specifically for that show). While I was in town, I was trying to think of who I would like to interview. The first person who came to mind was Andrew Warner.

In this conversation, you’ll learn:

Monetization: Andrew was the first podcaster I can think of to put his past episodes behind a paywall. Why does Andrew think that was a great decision, what drove that decision, and why does he hate the word “paywall?" Did Andrew create the category of the entrepreneurial interview podcast? I was dying to know who inspired Andrew to interview entrepreneurs in the first place. We’ll find out. Why is harsh criticism a gift? Andrew shares his perspective which helps him keep improving.

Also, the day before the interview, Andrew messaged me. He wanted to change the location of the interview. We were originally going to do it in Mixergy’s offices in the Financial District of San Francisco, but now Andrew was inviting me to his HOUSE.

He said he’d explain why later. You’ll hear why in the interview – it’s pretty cool.

Links and resources mentioned Pagerduty Crescent Hotel NEA Mixergy Hero’s Journey Venture Voice Rosalind Resnick Howard Stern This American Life The Biography Of WordPress with Matt Mullenweg shorty awards Everyone is Accessible – interview with Gregory Galant VV Show #40 – Reid Hoffman of LinkedIn Anchor techstars AngelList Paul Graham Readwise Airtable Kindle Direct Publishing We've reached a new funding goal! We now have detailed show notes, starting with next week's interview episode. Start supporting Love Your Work at patreon.com/kadavy. Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

https://ce.uci.edu/
https://backblaze.com
https://kadavy.net/motivation

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/srini-rao-unmistakable-creative-podcast/



37. 168. Use Task Transitions to Optimize Your Creative Flow
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/t... download (audio/mpeg, 10.89Mb)

Description:

To optimize your creative output, you need a creative productivity system. If you can identify the building blocks of your daily work, you can construct a system that works for you.

One of those building blocks is what I call “task transitions.” Task transitions are those little spaces between finishing one task, and starting another. Each transition is a critical moment. It’s when you decide whether you’ll keep moving, take an intentional break, or simply fall off the tracks.

I’ll tell you more in this week’s episode.

We've reached a new funding goal! We'll have detailed show notes, starting with next week's interview episode. Start supporting Love Your Work at patreon.com/kadavy. Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

https://ce.uci.edu/ https://kadavy.net/motivation

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/task-transitions-podcast/



38. 167. Vanessa Van Edwards: The Science of People
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/v... download (audio/mpeg, 24.99Mb)

Description:

Vanessa Van Edwards (@vvanedwards) is a recovering awkward person who teaches people how to be more successful with people.

Vanessa was a great student, but, she says, she was terrible with people. Until one day she discovered that she could study people and interacting with people the same way she studied math and science.

In fact, she used math and science to break down social interactions. She set up a lab and started running experiments on everything from conversation starters to reading facial expressions.

She shares everything she’s learned in her hit book, Captivate: The Science of Succeeding with People. This book breaks down social interaction so you can succeed, whether that’s thriving in networking events, or having a more fulfilling dating life.

You’re going to learn:

How can awkwardness be a part of your own unique brand of charisma? How can you get the most out of conferences, even if you’re an introvert? What is "The Franklin Effect," and how can it make you more likable, even to your mortal enemies? We've almost reached a new funding goal! Help us get detailed show notes. Start supporting Love Your Work at patreon.com/kadavy. Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

https://ce.uci.edu/

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/vanessa-van-edwards-podcast/



39. 166. Build Foolproof Triggers Into Your Productivity System
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/p... download (audio/mpeg, 11.27Mb)

Description:

To follow a productivity system, you need to be able to trust that system. You need to trust that if you put something into the system, it will get taken care of at the right time and place. But the more complex you make that system, the harder it becomes to follow and maintain.

This is where building “triggers” becomes invaluable in tweaking a system that works for you. A “trigger” is a stimulus that elicits a response. You can use productivity triggers to simplify your productivity system. Triggers keep your productivity system running smoothly, and they keep your system from getting bogged down complexity.

In this week’s article, I’ll tell you exactly how to find the right triggers for you to use to be effortlessly productive.

We've almost reached a new funding goal! Help us get detailed show notes. Start supporting Love Your Work at patreon.com/kadavy. Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

https://ce.uci.edu/

Shown notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/productivity-triggers-podcast/



40. 165. Creative Optimization Through Neuroscience: Dr. David Rock
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/d... download (audio/mpeg, 38.54Mb)

Description:

Dr. David Rock (@davidrock101) is the author of Your Brain at Work, is also the founder of the NeuroLeadership Institute. They use a science-based approach to growing soft skills, working with companies such as Intel, Microsoft, and IBM.

When I was just getting finished writing my first book, Design for Hackers, I was really mystified by what was going on in my own brain. I wanted to know why creativity was easy sometimes, and hard other times.

That’s when I picked up Your Brain at Work, and my work changed forever. It served as a handbook for my brain. I learned to think about the strengths and limitations of my brain, the different categories of thought, and what mental and emotional states would make creative work come easily.

Today, you’ll learn about:

What are level one, two, and three tasks, in terms of your brain’s horsepower? How can you manage your day by these categories? What is construal, and how can it help you work more quickly, with more clarity? What are the four keys to creating the conditions for insight? If you can set up your work so that you’re consistently creating these conditions, you’ll think more creatively. We've almost reached a new funding goal! Help us get detailed show notes. Start supporting Love Your Work at patreon.com/kadavy. Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

https://ce.uci.edu/

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/david-rock-podcast/



41. 164. My Creative Productivity System
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/c... download (audio/mpeg, 18.29Mb)

Description:

Creative productivity is about mind management, not time management. You have to get into the right mental state to be creative. And you need to have your brain stocked with the knowledge it takes to solve the creative problem at hand.

I believe creative energy is the next resource to be managed—at least in the age of creative productivity. Think about the way we manage time, and we take that for granted. That’s why I’ve built my own system specifically to manage my creative energy.

Today I’ll be sharing, in more detail than ever, the exact creative productivity system I use to crank out not just the ideas for books and podcast episodes, but to actually produce the work.

We've almost reached a new funding goal! Help us get detailed show notes. Start supporting Love Your Work at patreon.com/kadavy. Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

https://ce.uci.edu/

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/creative-productivity-system-podcast/



42. 163. Click Here to Be Creative: Mark McGuinness of the 21st Century Creative Podcast
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/m... download (audio/mpeg, 32.23Mb)

Description:

Mark McGuinness (@markmcguinness) is a creative coach, a poet, and a former psychotherapist and hypnotherapist. Steven Pressfield, author of The War of Art, calls Mark an "overeducated Brit who thinks deeply about stuff you and I have never heard of."

Mark is the host of the 21st Century Creative Podcast. On the 21st Century Creative, Mark explores how to take advantage of the huge opportunities presented by the digital age. This at a time when there are more distractions than ever threatening to take you off course, and fewer traditional safety nets to catch you when you fall.

In this conversation, we'll talk about:

Click here to be creative: How to use mantras, chakras, – and other sometimes thought of as "woo" things – as like graphical user interfaces for altering your mental state. How the feeling > action > response loop can guide your creative direction: If you're wondering how to create work that really moves people, this is the key. How to use impostor syndrome to your advantage. It's a double-edged sword, or a sushi knife, as you'll see. Use it carefully.

Mark also mentioned his 20 Creative Blocks list and ebook in the conversation.

 

 

Sponsors

https://ce.uci.edu/

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/mark-mcguinness-podcast/



43. 162. Productivity Cycles
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/p... download (audio/mpeg, 10.64Mb)

Description:

When you're trying to make it as a creative entrepreneur, you need to make the most out of everything you have. You need maximum output with minimal investment of time and energy.

The more complex you make things, the more you get bogged down. The more you surrender your creativity to the whims of the the muse, the harder you make it to bring your work into the world.

Last week, as we talked to Paul Jarvis, you heard how he uses repeatable processes to make the most of his resources. I call these repeatable processes "productivity cycles." This week, I'll break down what's so great about productivity cycles, I'll share some productivity cycles that I follow, and I'll tell you how to build your own productivity cycles, based upon how you work.

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

Patreon supporters are now covering ALL production costs for Love Your Work! Join our wonderful Patreon backers at patreon.com/kadavy.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

https://ce.uci.edu

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/productivity-cycles-podcast/



44. 161. Paul Jarvis: Manage Your Creative Energy in a Company of One
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/p... download (audio/mpeg, 43.48Mb)

Description:

What if success isn't about scaling up as big as possible? What if success is actually about the freedom to call your own shots?

Paul Jarvis (@pjrvs) was asking himself these questions as he left the corporate world way back in the 90s. Now he works from his home in the woods on an island near Vancouver. He explores what he's learned in his new book, Company of One: Why Staying Small is the Next Big Thing for Business.

Previously, Paul was a freelance designer, working with clients such as Microsoft, Mercedes-Benz, and Marie Forleo. He now writes books, and makes courses and software products. Courses such as Creative Class, which teaches you how to "go pro" in your freelance career, and software such as Fathom Analytics, which gives you simple website analytics without tracking or storing your users' personal data.

In this conversation you'll learn:

How to manage your time in a company of one: Paul shares specific details on how he manages his time on a weekly basis, a monthly basis, and beyond. How to build your company of one around your skills: How does Paul build on his strengths and make his weaknesses irrelevant? How to make room for creativity by being organized: Learn why systems and processes actually enhance creativity rather than stifle it. Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

Patreon supporters are now covering ALL production costs for Love Your Work! Join our wonderful Patreon backers at patreon.com/kadavy.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

http://audible.com/loveyourwork

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/paul-jarvis-podcast/



45. 160. The 12-Minute Workout to Be Fit AND Healthy in 2019. "Body by Science."
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/b... download (audio/mpeg, 14.73Mb)

Description:

To start off the New Year you can see that we're covering topics for how to improve oneself – stuff like staying focused or even staying secure in your digital life.

This week, I'd like to share with you a workout protocol that I've been enjoying for staying fit AND healthy – which, as you'll see, are not the same thing.

I've tried many different workout programs, INSANITY, CrossFit, Strongfirst, many others. This is by far the best results for time investment I've ever experienced. It's a workout that only takes about 12 minutes, once a week.

Now, I know a claim like that makes your BS detectors go off, but hear me out. And as you'll see, just because it's only 12 minutes doesn't mean it's easy. But I personally find it really enjoyable.

Disclaimer: Always talk to your doctor and fitness professional before starting or changing an exercise routine. Try any of the following at your own risk.

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

Patreon supporters are now covering ALL production costs for Love Your Work! Join our wonderful Patreon backers at patreon.com/kadavy.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/body-by-science-summary-review/



46. 159. Secure Your Digital Life in 2019: Chris Wilken of Let's Fix Security
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/d... download (audio/mpeg, 46.36Mb)

Description:

Chris Wilken (@whereswilken) is founder and CEO of Let's Fix Security. He takes a behavioral approach to thinking about security, trying to make good security practices easy to implement. As a small business owner and a person in general, I've been thinking more and more about how to stay secure online.

As soon as you start trying to think about how to stay secure online, you start to feel overwhelmed. It's hard to think up new passwords that are tough to hack, and it's even harder to keep them all straight. The two-factor authentication that more and more services are starting to require is annoying.

I have limited resources as a solopreneur. Any unexpected interruption or loss of data means I'm not working on the things I want to be working on. Yet I also don't have the resources to have a full-time security expert to keep things buttoned up. It's probably the same for you. So this episode is for you.

In this episode, we'll talk about:

Are you a target? You don't have to be high-profile to be a victim of a security breach. Find out why everyone is vulnerable. How can good habits make security easy? We often put off thinking about digital security because it can be overwhelming. Throughout this whole conversation we'll be talking about how to reduce overwhelm so you can take action. Learn what the four "buckets" of security are. We'll be talking about how to prioritize your security concerns, again so you can take action. Make sure your most important stuff is secure.

One thing I wanted to mention. I talk in this conversation about canisters for securing cryptocurrency paper wallets. I researched further, and it turns out that's not what they're called, so if you search, you'll have trouble finding them.

They're actually intended to be "pill cases,". They are still very handy for keeping paper-based two-factor authentication numbers – especially if you're nomadic or traveling.

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

Patreon supporters are now covering ALL production costs for Love Your Work! Join our wonderful Patreon backers at patreon.com/kadavy.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/digital-security-basics/



47. 158. One Resolution for Your Phone
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/o... download (audio/mpeg, 6.80Mb)

Description:

Smart phones are powerful. But with great power comes great potential to get off track. Smart phones are like a superpower. If you had x-ray vision, you wouldn't want to use it all of the time.

I've discovered one simple thing to do with my smartphone. Since I started doing this, it's made me more productive than ever.

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

Patreon supporters are now covering ALL production costs for Love Your Work! Join our wonderful Patreon backers at patreon.com/kadavy.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/one-phone-resolution/



48. 157. Be Hyperfocused in 2019: Chris Bailey, Author of The Productivity Project & Hyperfocus
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/c... download (audio/mpeg, 42.82Mb)

Description:

Chris Bailey (@Chris_Bailey) had a crazy thought: What if, after graduating from college, instead of getting a job – what if instead he spent a year learning everything he could about productivity?

Chris followed that crazy thought into a project he called "A Year of Productivity." That was five years ago, and Chris has now written two books: First, The Productivity Project, and now his new book is Hyperfocus: How to Be More Productive in a World of Distraction.

Chris has a unique approach to productivity advice. He mixes scientific research with his own sometimes-whacky personal experimentation. He once purposefully made himself bored for an hour a day with tasks such as "watching paint dry" or "reading the iTunes Terms and Conditions."

As we go into 2019, we're all thinking about how we can be better in many things. This conversation will give you fresh thinking for how you keep yourself productive and focused.

We'll talk about:

How did Chris make the decision to turn down job offers and dedicate himself to studying productivity? The more confident you can be in your decisions, the more focused you can be. Chris's "regret minimization" technique will help you frame your big decisions. How does Chris separate the scientific research behind staying productive and focused from the hype around being productive and focused? The better you can separate the wheat from the chaff, the easier you can find what works for you. How can you start forming your own unique approach to productivity and focus – and how can you start that TODAY? There are already clues you can look at to start being more focused than ever. Chris is going to share those with you.

Image credit: Chris Roussakis

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

Patreon supporters are now covering ALL production costs for Love Your Work! Join our wonderful Patreon backers at patreon.com/kadavy.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/chris-bailey-hyperfocus/



49. 156. It Takes Three Years to Accomplish Anything Meaningful
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/t... download (audio/mpeg, 6.54Mb)

Description:

December 15th is the three year anniversary of Love Your Work. I've often found that it takes three years to really accomplish something, so I get the sense that something big is around the corner. Then again, the podcast has recently become profitable, so maybe that big thing is already here.

We often want results right away, but oftentimes, it takes three years. I talk about it on today's episode.

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

Patreon supporters are now covering ALL production costs for Love Your Work! Join our wonderful Patreon backers at patreon.com/kadavy.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/three-years/



50. 155. Tyler Cowen: Be Dynamic
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/t... download (audio/mpeg, 40.03Mb)

Description:

When your life gets too comfortable, you stop taking risks. Loss aversion takes hold and you become complacent. You stop innovating. You stop being dynamic. By the time you realize you've become irrelevant, it's already too late to change.

This is one of the main themes behind the work of Tyler Cowen (@tylercowen). Tyler writes one of the most influential economics blogs in the world – if not THE most influential – at marginalrevolution.com. He's also an economics professor at George Mason University.

In Tyler's book, The Complacent Class, he argues that Americans are getting too comfortable, and not taking risks – or, as the title would imply, they're getting complacent. Average is Over – another of Cowen's books argues. The complacency of Americans is leading to The Great Stagnation, another of Tyler's books. Instead of being stagnant, we should be dynamic. Keep learning, take risks, and step out of your comfort zone. This, Tyler believes, will lead to economic growth, which Tyler argues is a good thing in his latest book, Stubborn Attachments.

I was thinking about the theme of taking risks and stepping outside of your comfort zone just before I wrote this intro in a cafe in Chicago. Moments prior, I was thinking about how – out of all of the places in the world – this cafe was not where I wanted to be in that moment. Not only had my Colombian visa application been rejected, but my first AirBNB stop in Chicago turned out to have a bedbug infestation – so I had to hastily move to a different one.

But then I realized that while my life is riddled with problems in recent months – and if you're interested in details, listen to my recent notes right here on this podcast, especially "An Update on My Colombian Visa."

While my life has these problems, these problems lead to growth. They're problems that lead to a lifestyle that I have built and that I continue to build. I could avoid all of these problems by living a more comfortable and stable lifestyle, but that wouldn't help me grow in the ways I want to grow. It would cause me to stagnate.

Critically important, I've designed my life and work to withstand volatility – whether that's political, financial, or emotional volatility. Not only can I withstand that volatility, I can grow from it.

I've built this outlook with the support of Tyler's thinking. I find him to have a holistic view of the economics that rule our world – with uncommon emphasis on art, culture, and creativity. So, this is perfect timing to have Tyler on the show.

In this conversation, we'll explore:

Why should you move? Tyler says that even if you're merely considering a change, that probably means you should make that change. He explains the data that tells you why. Is there a "next Austin" just waiting to explode in growth? Find out where that "next Austin" might be so you can get there first and take advantage of the opportunity. One way we get complacent is by trusting algorithms to make all of our decisions for us, whether that's on Netflix or Facebook or Amazon. How can you be "anti-algorithm", and how can being "anti-algorithm" help you be more dynamic.

Image credit: [Politics and Prose Bookstore](https://www.flickr.com/photos/politicsandprose/5907532234/in/album-72157627002886179/ ).

Love Your Work is now available on Pandora!

Pandora recently launched a podcast genome, and Love Your Work is one of the few hand-picked podcasts included in the public beta. To sign up for the beta, go to https://pandorapodcastbeta.splashthat.com

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/tyler-cowen-interview/



51. 154. Eight Stoic Mantras for Creators
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/e... download (audio/mpeg, 6.20Mb)

Description:

We're wired to seek pleasure, and avoid pain. But to make it as a creator, you need to push yourself outside of your comfort zone. Many things that feel good about creating can hold you back, while many things that feel bad are powerful fuel.

Stoicism is a philosophy that has been getting a lot of attention lately. Ryan Holiday, who we talked with on episode 31 is one modern popularizer of Stocism. In today's episode, I share with you eight mantras I tell myself to resist temptations that will only hurt my creative work in the long run.

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/eight-stoic-mantras-creators/



52. 153. Your Mess Is Your Message. Amber Rae on Choosing Wonder Over Worry.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/a... download (audio/mpeg, 32.33Mb)

Description:

Amber Rae (@heyamberrae] was on the wrong path. She was swept up in the hype of the Silicon Valley startup scene. She was working too many hours on too many projects. She pushed herself so hard, she drove herself into anxiety, addiction, and eventually triggered a seizure.

But Amber was doing some writing on the side. That writing helped her discover what she was hiding from, and find meaning in her past. In Amber's mess, she found the message.

Now Amber helps entrepreneurs and creators develop emotional mastery. She's sharing what she's learned in her new book, Choose Wonder Over Worry: Move Beyond Fear and Doubt to Unlock Your Full Potential.

In today's conversation, we'll talk about:

What's easy for you, but amazing for others? You'll hear shortcuts you can take to find the secret superpower hiding right beneath your nose. How did Amber become a writer by accident? You'll hear about the way she mentally framed the work she did, and how that held her back in some areas, while propelling her forward in others. What did Amber learn from working closely with Seth Godin? What did she do when Seth told her he thought the project she was working on would wind up a failure?

Amber's a very exciting creator, and there's much much more to this conversation, so listen to hear the rest.

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/amber-rae-podcast/



53. NOTE: Chicago Meetup CANCELLED
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 5.47Mb)

Description:

I regretfully have to cancel tonight's meetup in Chicago.



54. 152. Creative Hygiene
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/c... download (audio/mpeg, 6.15Mb)

Description:

One thing I've discovered in talking to many of my guests is that your creative voice doesn't magically appear in your mind. You have to put in the work, and then your voice emerges from that work.

But to do that work, you have to keep your creative machinery working. You have to keep putting out work, and you have to keep cleaning out the waste that gets in the way of putting out that work.

That's what I'm talking about on this week's episode. I call it "creative hygiene."

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/creative-hygiene/



55. NOTE: Rejected again.
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 7.06Mb)

Description:

Bad news.



56. NOTE: An Update on My Colombian Visa
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 32.10Mb)

Description:

A long and detailed update about the status of my Colombian visa.



57. 151. Mind Mastery Through Neurofeedback. Ariel Garten of Muse.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/a... download (audio/mpeg, 35.20Mb)

Description:

Ariel Garten (@ariel_garten) envisions a world where we can control computers with our minds. She's on the cutting edge of computer and brain interfaces with her creation, the Muse headband.

Ariel sent me a headband a few months ago, and I've been using it to refine my meditation sessions. The headband gives me neurofeedback to help me identify a relaxed-focus mental state.

So while I'm meditating, I get audio feedback that's an expression of my brain's activity. That audio feedback helps me adjust my meditation technique.

The point of muse is to train your brain into focusing on one thing so you can build that skill and carry it over into other forms of meditation, as well as to have the mental awareness throughout the day to manage your attention and focus.

I've experimented with EEG headsets before. I first bought one about seven years ago. The Muse absolutely blows away that experience. In addition to being useful for meditation, it is also a clinical-grade headset – used by neuroscientists everywhere – that measures all brainwaves as well as certain movements.

In this conversation, we'll talk about:

What mental cues can keep you in a meditative state? We'll talk about how mental cues differ from one form of meditation to another, and how those cues relate to what Muse measures. How do you develop a product with a new technology, when the application is unclear? Hear Ariel's story about how Muse started as a playful experiment, and evolved into a useful product. How do you follow disparate interests to an original idea. Ariel has a background in psychotherapy, fashion design, neuroscience (of course) – as well as having many other interests. How has that curiosity helped her arrive at an original idea, and how did she see past the naysayers who wanted her to focus on one thing?

Muse is not a sponsor, but they have set up a special deal for our listeners. If you use the code LOVEYOURWORK at choosemuse.com, you'll get 15% off the Muse headset, or the new Muse 2. Plus, a portion of your purchase will support the show. Again, that's LOVEYOURWORK at choosemuse.com.

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/ariel-garten-podcast/



58. 150. Stop Organizing by Project. Start Organizing by Mental State.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/m... download (audio/mpeg, 9.43Mb)

Description:

Productivity is about mind management, not time management. I've been thinking about how this applies to managing your tasks on a day-to-day basis.

I've come to realize that as long as you have the proper due dates attached to your tasks, it doesn’t matter what project those todos are for. What matters is your ability to do those tasks in an energy-efficient way.

In this week's episode, I share with you how I keep creative work coming with ease all day long.

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/mental-state-not-todos/



59. 149. Reclaim Creativity: Srini Rao of The Unmistakable Creative on "Creating for An Audience of One"
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/s... download (audio/mpeg, 35.70Mb)

Description:

Srini Rao (@unmistakableCEO) is host of the Unmistakable Creative podcast, and author of the new book, Audience of One: Reclaiming Creativity for Its Own Sake. In Audience of One, Srini gives you the tools and encouragement you need to stop focusing on external validation, and to reconnect with your creative spark.

In a world where you can publish your creative work to more people than ever, it's easy to lose sight of why we create. If you're dead set on your work reaching a lot of people, ironically, you'll lose touch with that special something that makes your work resonate with others in the first place.

In this conversation, we'll talk about:

How do you follow up a success to reconnect with "Creativity for Its Own Sake?" We'll hear about how Srini's self-published book hit the Wall Street Journal bestseller list, and we'll hear about how he has struggled to reconnect with the true source of creative work that resonates with others. How do you ask a question that gets right to a great story. Srini asks great questions on his podcast, The Unmistakable Creative – in fact, I was on there recently, and he got stories out of me that I had never told before. So I loved digging into his questioning style. His thoughts on this could be as useful for a first date as they are for a podcast interview. What has Srini learned from hosting more than 700 podcast interviews? He'll break down the best tips and ways of thinking that he's gleaned from creators, bank robbers, drug dealers, performance psychologists, and more. Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

Patreon supporters are now covering ALL production costs for Love Your Work! Join our wonderful Patreon backers at patreon.com/kadavy.

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60. 148. Prompt Talking: One Simple Trick for Irresistible Communication
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/p... download (audio/mpeg, 8.59Mb)

Description:

There's something I've noticed that very successful communicators do. It's a very simple tactic, but it can go a long way in making everything you say or write more engaging, more memorable, and more effective.

I'll tell you about it – this thing that successful communicators do – this week.

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

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Sponsors

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/prompt-talking-podcast/



61. 147. Jason Fried: It Doesn't Have to Be Crazy at Work
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/j... download (audio/mpeg, 37.44Mb)

Description:

You hear it all of the time. Maybe you even say it yourself: It's "crazy" at work. There are unrealistic deadlines, demanding bosses, and wall-to-wall meetings.

Jason Fried (@jasonfried) believes it doesn't have to be that way. In fact, he'll tell you why in his new book, called It Doesn't Have to Be Crazy at Work.

Jason needs no introduction for many of you, but for everyone else: Jason is the CEO of Basecamp, which is simple yet powerful project management software. Basecamp the software has a long history of staying simple even when it doesn't make intuitive sense. Basecamp the company, with Jason at the helm, has a long history of espousing sensible work practices, even when they don't make intuitive sense.

We'll talk about:

What's the difference between deadlines, and "dreadlines?" How can this simple distinction help you stay in control of your projects? How does Jason and his company struggle with it being "crazy" at work, and what do they do about it? Hear about their fascinating "uphill/downhill" tactic for deciding when to quit a project that just won't end. Hear specific ways to handle clients that make it "crazy" at work. Jason will tell you exactly what to say, and guide you through a real-life scenario using the stoic technique of "negative visualization."

Jason was the very first guest on Love Your Work, three years ago. I'm thrilled to have him back.

Image credit: Michael Berger

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/jason-fried-podcast-2/



62. 146. "Black Swan" Marketing Growth
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/b... download (audio/mpeg, 13.20Mb)

Description:

When you're marketing your business, it's easy to gravitate toward sure bets. Things you can do and be assured of a positive outcome. But these sure bets can cause you to miss out on asymmetric opportunities: Things that take a small amount of investment, with a small chance of a very big upside.

We talked about asymmetric opportunities in last week's conversation with Tynan. This week, I'll tell you how to find asymmetric opportunities for growing your business. These are also known as "Black Swans." We'll get to why.

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/black-swan-marketing-podcast/



63. 145. Tynan: The Asymmetry of the Insane
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/t... download (audio/mpeg, 39.78Mb)

Description:

Sometimes an idea pops into your head, and you think to yourself, "nah, that's insane!" Then you move on with living your regular life.

We all have these ideas. Sometimes we don't even notice them. In The Heart to Start, I called the source of these crazy ideas "The Voice."

The thing is, sometimes these crazy ideas are what you call "asymmetrical": It doesn't take much to try them out, but the potential payoffs are huge.

Our guest today has to be the king of crazy ideas. Tynan (@tynan) is his name. That's it, he just has one name – like Madonna. Tynan.

Just a few of the crazy ideas that Tynan has followed through on: He owns a private island (it's not as expensive as you think); he lived in San Francisco, rent-free in an RV, for several years; and he owns both a minivan and a Bentley.

Tynan is also a serial self-publisher, and watching his self-publishing story was a source of inspiration for me as I made the leap from traditional to self publishing.

I first met Tynan several years ago. He joined mutual friends of ours for dinner during my mini-life in Austin. When I met Tynan, I thought to myself "if and when I have a podcast, this is definitely the type of person I want to have as a guest."

Here's some of what you'll learn:

What thought processes can you employ to seek out interesting opportunities in your life? How can you prevent yourself from making an emotional decision about your crazy ideas, and instead see the true cost/benefit? If you have a crazy idea, but you have hesitation about following it, what are some ways you can break through that hesitation, and any other mental blocks you see?

Tynan's new book is Forever Nomad, and his site Cruisesheet is full of the best cruise deals.

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/tynan-podcast/

 



64. 144. Walk Through Fire.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/w... download (audio/mpeg, 6.12Mb)

Description:

What does it really take to "make it" as a creative entrepreneur? I often have people asking me for ideas on strategies for how to smoothly transition from their day jobs to making their art for a living.

Is it possible? What do you have to do?

I always feel like I have an answer that they don't want to hear. But here it is anyway, in this week's episode.

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Sponsors

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/walk-through-fire/



65. 143. Double Down or Shut Down? Nathan Barry of ConvertKit
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/n... download (audio/mpeg, 37.30Mb)

Description:

Nathan Barry (@nathanbarry) knows better than anyone: Sometimes, you're working hard on something, and it's just not happening. How do you decide whether to double down, or shut down?

This is what Nathan was asking himself two years after launching his email service, ConvertKit. He was bringing in only $1,500 a month, and he was losing customers every month.

It was time to decide: Double down, or shut down.

Today, ConvertKit brings in much more than $1,500 a month. They recently had their first million dollar month.

Spoiler alert: Instead of shutting down, Nathan did double down. Today, we’ll analyze how he made that decision:

When Nathan decided to double down, he had no idea if his business would succeed. How did Nathan – and his spouse – mentally prepare for the worst-case scenario? Nathan had to dig into his savings to the tune of $100,000 to double down on ConvertKit. What criteria did he use to know whether or not to quit. What was the one question Nathan asked himself that ultimately got him to double down?

This is a super valuable conversation. It's incredibly helpful if you've been working on a project that just isn't taking off. I've used this conversation myself to think about this podcast, how I define success, and how I should divvy up my own resources amongst my various projects.

(Note: Since recording this episode, ConvertKit has decided not to rebrand as Seva after all.)

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/nathan-barry-podcast/



66. 142. Aspiration Procrastination, Self-Discrepancy Theory, & How to Take Action on Your Dreams
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/a... download (audio/mpeg, 11.21Mb)

Description:

It's no surprise that we procrastinate on things that we don't want to do. But why do we procrastinate on things we do want to do?: Our hopes, dreams, and aspirations.

I call it aspiration procrastination, and there's a fascinating theory from psychology that can help you understand why you put off your dreams, and what you can do about it. I'll talk about it in this week's episode.

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/aspiration-procrastination/



67. 141. Stone Temple Pilots' Manager: Blockchain Will Reinvent the Music Industry. Steve Stewart of Vezt.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/s... download (audio/mpeg, 40.96Mb)

Description:

Steve Stewart was manager of the band Stone Temple Pilots. He guided them from being an unknown funk band to a multi-platinum powerhouse whose sound is synonymous with 90's grunge. With Steve by STP's side, they sold over 25 million records, for nearly half a billion dollars in sales.

But then the Internet happened. The record industry wasn't selling many CD's or records anymore. Fans were becoming a bigger part of helping music spread, and free music was key to the new success equation.

Steve had to stand by helplessly as big music industry players shot themselves in the foot, and tightened their budgets in the process. But now, Steve is trying to fill in the gap that free music created.

Now, imagine that Justin Bieber paid you. With Steve's new company, that could become true. Steve is now CEO of Vezt. With Vezt, music fans like you can buy a share of the future earnings of a song. So if you're a Justin Bieber fan, you could at some point buy a share of his song.

(In case you're wondering, you can't "short" a song, these aren't stocks you're buying.)

We're going to learn more about how that works in today's conversation. Find out:

What artistic decisions did Stone Temple Pilots have to make in order to become a huge success? I take Steve back to the early days, and we find out why early-90's music critics have called him to apologize. How does Vezt fill in the hole that music-sharing created? Fans have become a part of the music promotion process, with Vezt, they'll start getting a piece of the pie. Blockchain companies are hot now, but the blockchain is not always relevant to the business model. What about blockchain technology makes Vezt possible? Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

Patreon supporters are now covering ALL production costs for Love Your Work! Thank you supporters! To help, go to kadavy.net/donate.

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Sponsors

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/steve-stewart-stone-temple-pilots-vezt/



68. 140. Grow Your Passion. Don't "Find" it.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/d... download (audio/mpeg, 6.68Mb)

Description:

You've heard the advice to find your passion. You've probably also heard the advice that finding your passion is bad advice.

But if you shouldn't "find" your passion, what should you do? Isn't passion important?

New research tells us exactly what is wrong with "finding" your passion. It's the subject of this week's article.

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

Patreon supporters are now covering ALL production costs for Love Your Work! Thank you supporters! To help, go to kadavy.net/donate.

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Sponsors

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/dont-find-your-passion/



69. 139. Brave: The Browser That Will Pay You. Jonathan Sampson of Brave.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/w... download (audio/mpeg, 35.17Mb)

Description:

Brave is a new browser that's reinventing the attention economy. Brave does block ads, but it's not just an ad blocker. It also blocks scripts that slow down your browsing experience, invade your privacy, and leave you vulnerable to hackers.

Since much of the internet currently runs on the ad-supported model, Brave doesn't stop there, with the blocking of ads. They've invented a cryptocurrency that could change creative monetization forever. You can use the Basic Attention Token, or BAT, to pay creators whose content you consume most – or, as a site owner, you can earn BAT. In fact, I've earned some BAT myself.

In the future, Brave says they will be paying you for browsing content. Now how does that work!? We'll talk about that and more in today's conversation. I'm talking to Jonathan Sampson (@bravesampson), who is Brave's Senior Developer Relations Specialist. We'll talk about:

How did we end up with an internet where we need a browser like Brave. Brave's founder and CEO invented Javascript, yet Brave blocks a ton of Javascript. How did that happen? Brave claims to save you about $23 a month, and give you a browsing experience up to 8 times faster. Where do those gains come from? How is it possible that Brave could pay you for browsing the web? Where would the money come from, and who will be missing out on that money?

I've been using Brave regularly for a few months now, and I really enjoy it. As we'll talk about in this conversation, if you'd like to support the work I do, download Brave at kadavy.net/brave. If you stick with it for 30 days, Brave will reward me with $5 worth of BAT. Again, that's kadavy.net/brave.

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

Patreon supporters are now covering ALL production costs for Love Your Work! Thank you supporters! To help, go to kadavy.net/donate.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors 

http://skillshare.com/loveyourwork
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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/why-brave-browser/



70. 138. Things Don't Go As Planned. That *Is* the Plan.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/p... download (audio/mpeg, 11.93Mb)

Description:

Sometimes things don't go as planned. Just ask me, as I'm on my temporary exile in Peru right now, since having my Colombian visa rejected.

If we can’t plan something in our morning, if we can’t plan something when we visit a website, then where do we get the idea that we can plan things as complex as our lives? Or as complex as a big project, such as a book?

When things don’t go as planned, you get new information. You can use that information to make a new plan.

So, in this week's article, I'm suggesting that you make things not going as planned part of the plan. It can take you places you never expected to go.

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

Patreon supporters are now covering ALL production costs for Love Your Work! Thank you supporters! To help, go to kadavy.net/donate.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

http://backblaze.com/loveyourwork

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/plan-for-the-unplanned/

 



71. 137. Privacy. Why Does it Matter to Creative Entrepreneurs? BJ Mendelson
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/b... download (audio/mpeg, 47.47Mb)

Description:

BJ Mendelson (@bjmendelson) is author of Privacy: And How to Get it Back. One of the key themes we've been exploring on Love Your Work over the past three years has been just how it is that creators get paid. This was certainly top of my mind when I doubled down on writing and podcasting and moved to Colombia with no clear business model in site.

To understand how creators get paid, we need to understand the entire economy of content. How does content get monetized, and how much or how little of that monetization makes it to creators?

We've talked about how the economics of content shape technology in my essay on the Behavioral Revolution. We've talked about how those economics promote digital distraction in conversations with Hooked author, Nir Eyal. We've talked about new models for monetization – such as cryptocurrency-based compensation – with Steemit CEO Ned Scott, and with Maneesh Sethi from Pavlok.

Today, we're going to dig into privacy. When you understand how your privacy is being invaded to keep the web running, it becomes more clear just where things will be going in the future, and what you can do as both a creator and consumer of content to make that a bright future for yourself and your fellow creator.

In this conversation, we'll learn:

What are the ways that our privacy is invaded to keep the web running. Why does it matter? What can you do to protect your privacy, and encourage companies to search for other ways to monetize? Is the online advertising industry in for a day of reckoning? What trends should you, as a creative entrepreneur, be aware of? Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

Patreon supporters are now covering ALL production costs for Love Your Work! Thank you supporters! To help, go to kadavy.net/donate.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

http://skillshare.com/loveyourwork
http://backblaze.com/loveyourwork

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/bj-mendelson-privacy/



72. 136. Master The Art of Staying in
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/s... download (audio/mpeg, 7.13Mb)

Description:

Socializing is good. But socializing as a default — out of some Fear Of Missing Out — is not good. If you can find the discipline to pursue your work, while others are just killing time, you will have mastered The Art of Staying In.

The Art of Staying In is deciding not to go out and socialize just because it's the default thing to do. Instead, you use that time and energy to take control of your life and your work.

If you master The Art of Staying In, two things will happen.

One, you'll suddenly have a lot more time and get a lot more done. And two, you'll suddenly be in control of your destiny.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/stay-in-podcast/



73. 135. Adam Conover from "Adam Ruins Everything" on Creative Mindset in Comedy
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/a... download (audio/mpeg, 28.27Mb)

Description:

Adam Conover (@adamconover) had good things going for him. He had just graduated from college, and his sketch comedy group was a hit. So many people were watching their videos! This was before YouTube, so they kept on having to find new places to host the videos, there was so much traffic.

But then the group broke up. At first, Adam wasn't worried. Since he had so much success, he figured he could easily build a career in comedy.

But he slowly learned that he was wrong. It was slow going.

Today, Adam has his own hit show, Adam Ruins Everything, on TruTV. On Adam Ruins Everything, Adam takes a well-researched and hilarious approach to straightening out popular myths and misconceptions.

Adam has "ruined" Tylenol, pure bred dogs, and diamond engagement rings, just to name a few things. Adam Ruins Everything starts its third season on TruTV this fall.

So what happened? How did Adam work his way back to success in comedy?

In this episode you'll learn:

How did Adam discover that "ruining" things was his calling? What mindset did Adam have that helped him bounce back from failure to find success again? In businesses where personal connections are important, why does Adam tell you NOT to suck up to successful people. Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me

74. 134. 24 Things I Learned Publishing 3 Books in Only 6 Months
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/s... download (audio/mpeg, 14.06Mb)

Description:

After publishing my first book, it took me six years to publish my second book. After publishing my second book, it took me only six months to publish my fourth book. I published three books in the past six months, and I learned a ton along the way. I'm going to share it with you today.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/self-publishing-lessons/



75. 133. Make Art That Sells: Phil Thompson of Cape Horn Illustration
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/p... download (audio/mpeg, 52.85Mb)

Description:

Phil Thompson (@Cape_Horn_CHI) is the illustrator and business mind behind Cape Horn Illustration, which sells Chicago wall art. Today we have a great discussion on making art that sells.

Phil's portfolio of products includes maps of microbreweries in Chicago, marathon maps for all of the major marathons, and "home portraits." His work has been featured on the sets of major motion pictures like "The Big Sick," and "Blockers."

Phil also happens to be my mastermind partner. We've been talking every two weeks about how to balance our individual artistic visions with what the market wants. We've learned a lot in our conversations, and I'm really excited to be sharing Phil and his work with you today.

Today, we'll talk about:

How do you "validate" your art. Hear about Phil's first experiments in selling his artwork online. What did he learn from his first success, and what did he learn from his first big failure? How do you make your art marketable? Learn to think about what your art does for someone. How does that translate into sales? How can you turn your interests into profitable art? I love how Phil has been able to take his curiosities – whether it's running marathons or learning about Chicago architecture – and he's been able to use those curiosities to fuel profitable art. Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

http://skillshare.com/loveyourwork
http://weebly.com/loveyourwork 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/phil-thompson/



76. 132. Stay in Bed & Have Your Best Ideas Ever
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/s... download (audio/mpeg, 7.97Mb)

Description:

You heard me talk last week about morning routines, with the co-author of My Morning Routine, Benjamin Spall. I have a new morning routine I've been practicing this year, and it's been giving me some of my best ideas yet. The amazing part is I'm able to do this routine before I even get out of bed.

I'll tell you why in this essay.

 

 

Sponsors

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/stay-bed-podcast/ 



77. 131. Build Your Morning Routine. Benjamin Spall, Author of "My Morning Routine"
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/m... download (audio/mpeg, 39.20Mb)

Description:

Benjamin Spall is co-author of the new book, My Morning Routine: How Successful People Start Every Day Inspired. He and his co-author have interviewed 300 successful people from business, fitness, and the arts. People like Biz Stone, Arianna Huffington, General Stanley McCrystal, and Marie Kondo.

The way you spend your first hour of your day sets the tone for the rest of your day. But there seems to be endless ways to you can spend this precious time. Should you meditate? Go for a jog? Do some writing?

Oh, and I'm in the book as well (page 132). They interviewed me about my morning routine, and my evening routine. I'll tell you why I wear the dorkiest orange goggles imaginable before bed.

They've looked for the patterns amongst successful people to find out the things you'll hear about in this conversation. Things like:

What time do successful people get up in the morning? You hear a lot of talk about getting up at 4 a.m.. Is that the norm? How do successful people manage technology to get the most out of their days? You'll hear a tip from a former Love Your Work guest, Nir Eyal. And if you haven't optimized your morning routine, the options can be overwhelming. How can you start making lasting changes now?

 

 

Sponsors

http://skillshare.com/loveyourwork 
http://earthclassmail.com
http://weebly.com/loveyourwork 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/morning-routines-podcast/



78. 130. How to Prioritize? Listen to Your Body.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/l... download (audio/mpeg, 6.80Mb)

Description:

Clear prioritization inspires clear action. But how do you decide what's the most important todo item to tackle first? For me, I like to listen to my body.

It's the subject of this week's essay.

 

 

Sponsors

http://weebly.com/loveyourwork 
http://earthclassmail.com 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/listen-body-podcast 



79. 129: Shane Snow: Turn Conflicts into Great Ideas
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/s... download (audio/mpeg, 45.34Mb)

Description:

You've heard about the importance of working with people who come from different perspectives. But will that automatically lead to great work?

It's not so simple. Our guest today, Shane Snow, was curious about why diverse teams are supposedly so powerful, when they're in fact hard to pull off.

That's why he wrote this new book, Dream Teams. In this book, Shane really breaks down what makes a truly great team. How can you have just the right amount of conflict to have better ideas and go farther as a team, without the relationships turning sour.

Even though I work by myself, I really enjoyed this book. It's full of great stories of dream teams throughout history, and it really made me think about how to seek out differing perspectives in improving the work I do.

In this conversation, Shane and I talk about:

Do we always have better ideas working with a team? What are the key components of making something great as a group? We also talk a lot about writing. How did Shane turn his curiosity for one subject, into a marketable idea about Dream Teams? We also trade tips about how we do research for the books we write. Hear exactly Shane and my different approaches to doing research and collecting ideas to write about.

 

 

Sponsors

http://skillshare.com/loveyourwork
http://weebly.com/loveyourwork
http://earthclassmail.com

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/shane-snow-interview/



80. NOTE: New Book: Make Money Writing on the STEEM Blockchain
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 2.04Mb)

Description:

I have a new book! STEEM is revolutionizing the way creators get paid. I've cashed out over $4,000 from writing on the STEEM blockchain. The most amazing thing is – nobody had to pay me a dime.

You heard me interview STEEM co-creator Ned Scott on episode 71. I explained how to make money on STEEM on episode 110. This short read is an updated and slightly expanded version of that free episode.

Grab the new book – on Kindle, Paperback, or Audible – at kadavy.net/steembook



81. 128. What Seneca Said About Facebook
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/s... download (audio/mpeg, 5.36Mb)

Description:

If you've heard about stoic philosophy, you've heard about Seneca. Stoicism is in many ways about being indifferent to pleasure or pain. One thing that's pleasurable is getting free things. Free things like Facebook.

After the Cambridge Analytica scandal, the mainstream is really waking up to the true cost of "free." If something is supposedly "free," you're paying for it in some other way, whether that's with your data, or just the opportunity costs of your attention. As you'll see, even Seneca knew that almost 2,000 years ago.

I've of course talked many times on this podcast about the broken economics of media. With Nir Eyal on episode 21, also on episode 22 when I talked about The Behavioral Revolution, and many many other times.

I wrote this article two years ago, but with everything going on in the collective conscious, I thought it would be a good time to dig it out and share it on the podcast.

It might help you reframe the idea of "free" in your mind, and make smart choices that make you the person you want to be.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/seneca-facebook-podcast/



82. 127. Art Is Hard. Tim Kasher, Rock Star/Filmmaker of Cursive, The Good Life, & No Resolution
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/t... download (audio/mpeg, 25.26Mb)

Description:

Tim Kasher's (@timkasher) work is deeply embedded in my creative DNA. When I was a young 20-something sitting in a cubicle in Omaha, Nebraska, Tim's work and his success was there to inspire me to find my own creative voice.

Tim is one of the pioneers of indie music. He's the frontman of Cursive. Of all of the Cursive songs out there, you're most likely to have heard "The Recluse."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9JcFgL2qO9Y

The Recluse is on Cursive's most successful album. The Ugly Organ recently passed its 15-year anniversary, and has sold an amazing 170,000 copies.

Before Cursive, Tim was in a band with Conor Oberst, of the band Bright Eyes, called Commander Venus. After leaving Commander Venus to focus on Cursive, Tim also started a folk band, The Good Life.

Omaha in the mid 90's and early 2000's was an indie-rock fan's paradise. Artists like Kasher and Oberst cross-pollinated. They started producing their own cassettes, and eventually formed the label Saddle Creek Records, featuring bands like Bright Eyes and The Faint.

The success of Saddle Creek records was a sign of the times. The Internet was allowing great music to spread. They could use lower-cost production and distribution, and communication for spreading their music and booking shows, and a cluster of kids from Nebraska could build a fanbase around the world.

I personally always found the story of Saddle Creek records and Tim Kasher inspiring. When the world was telling me to live one way, it seemed like the band members of the various Saddle Creek bands were always underfoot in any bar I stepped into. They were there to remind me you could do things your way, no matter where you're from.

I guess that message was still with me when I left Silicon Valley, and as I moved to Colombia to double down on writing and making this podcast. The message that you can "make it" anywhere. You can get by on the power of your ideas.

I also love that Tim isn't afraid to follow what interests him. He was brave to split genres between Cursive and The Good Life, and now he's branching off into other crafts. He recently wrote, directed, and produced his first feature film, No Resolution. Following the theme of dysfunctional relationships you'll often hear in Tim's lyrics, No Resolution is about a rift between an engaged couple on a particular New Year's Eve.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3f6Uzn6LgOI

Since Tim is multi-talented, he couldn't stop at writing and making an entire film, he even made a soundtrack to go along with it.

I'm thrilled to have Tim Kasher on the show. This is a great conversation for anyone looking to find their creative voice, and the courage to follow their unique path. Learn:

How does Tim think about genre? Fitting the confines of a genre can water your creative work down, but it can also help it find an audience. How did Tim avoid the "sophomore slump?" He had to push himself to find his creative truth. How does Tim follow his many interests? You can worry that you're spreading yourself thin, but Tim wanted to pave the way for other artists to do what's interesting to them.

Clips you'll hear during the interview are The Martyr, and Art Is Hard.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

http://skillshare.com/loveyourwork
http://weebly.com/loveyourwork

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/tim-kasher-podcast-interview/



83. NOTE: I made it back to Colombia. How? What now?
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 5.70Mb)

Description:

I was forced to leave Colombia, but now I'm back. Thanks everyone for the help over the past week. I'll explain shortly what happened, and what my situation is now.

If you're interested in an even more in-depth, though somewhat redundant overview, delivered after a good night's sleep, watch this Facebook live.

If you've been considering supporting the show, now is still a good time. This snafu has disrupted much of the past month, and will require more travel and expense to keep things going as normal. You can donate at http://kadavy.net/donate.

I'm also accepting the following cryptocurrencies:

bitcoin:3FKfyxtQ8wUww4XxGF9EZ6ukKzbPqCe3aQ

ethereum:0xE3CF82Feb6B83b18E37b472017e2a660d33B6fe0

monero:43AV7YumpkB4eAPgv3uMpW63svuqaM1C8ZdEoPvZe76wU8gxZYsdiqSEB4TJ UTkD3s7rmHzoxdEubBY7qNzyEAFf3HC4Knp



84. 126. Productivity is Limited. Creativity is Infinite.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/c... download (audio/mpeg, 6.62Mb)

Description:

Human productivity has its limits. You can only type so fast. You can only fill out a spreadsheet so fast. But creativity is infinite. It takes no time to have an idea, but not all ideas are created equal.

Traditional productivity and creative productivity seem to be at odds with each other. This week's essay explores why productivity is limited, and creativity is infinite.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/creativity-infinite-podcast/



85. NOTE: I Got Kicked Out of Colombia!
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 6.14Mb)

Description:

A short note for you listeners. I got kicked out of Colombia. I hope to keep bringing you a high-quality show. Thank you so much for your support. If you want to help keep the show coming, please support on Patreon at kadavy.net/donate



86. 125. "Education" Is a Waste?! Bryan Caplan, Author of "The Case Against Education"
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/b... download (audio/mpeg, 38.70Mb)

Description:

Is the educational system a waste of time and money? Most people can agree that schools are inefficient, boring, and expensive. I personally love learning, but I always hated school.

Yet, if you're like me, you're probably initially resistant to the idea that we should spend less on the educational system.

Our guest today, Bryan Caplan (@bryan_caplan), wants to make the case for spending less time, less money, and less human energy on trying to educate people. He's author of the new book, The Case Against Education: Why the Education System Is a Waste of Time and Money.

Bryan says that people aren't making more money after earning a college degree because they learned more. It's just the piece of paper itself that employers care about. If we didn't push so many people to earn college degrees – and to rack up debt in the process – degrees wouldn't be a base-level requirement for survival in today's job market.

Intriguing isn't it? In this conversation, you'll find out:

What's the difference between the "signaling" and the "human capital" models of looking at education? Why is this the key to seeing education as a waste of time and money? If we cut education, won't inequality get worse? Bryan tells us why he thinks cutting education spending would actually bring more opportunity to the underprivileged. What is the "social desirability bias?" Bryan tells us why this bias leads us blindly into wasting time and money on so-called education.

It's a thought-provoking conversation. You're bound to hear something you don't agree with, and you'll be forced to think about it. Hopefully you enjoy that as much as I do.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

Sponsors

http://skillshare.com/loveyourwork
http://weebly.com/loveyourwork

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/bryan-caplan-interview/



87. 124. Why Did it Take So Long for "Time Management" to Be Invented?
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/t... download (audio/mpeg, 7.76Mb)

Description:

As humanity progresses, we're always finding new resources to optimize. Time is one resource we optimize. But the idea of time management has become so ubiquitous, it's hard to imagine what it's like to not manage our time.

By understanding that time management as we know it hasn't been around forever, we can be prepared for the next resource to be optimized.

I talk more about that in this week's essay.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/time-management-invention-podcast/



88. 123. Do It For You. Drew Ackerman of the Sleep With Me Podcast
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/d... download (audio/mpeg, 37.89Mb)

Description:

Drew Ackerman (@dearestscooter) has a podcast so boring, it will put you to sleep. That's why it's so successful.

Almost five years ago, decided to make a podcast. Drew suffered from insomnia, so he wanted to make a podcast that would help people fall asleep.

Drew wrote stories and droned on, and gradually began to earn new listeners. Today, he's produced over 650 episodes. He's kept up a pace of about three episodes a week. Drew's show, called Sleep With Me, has millions of listeners. He's one of Patreon's top creators with almost 4,000 patrons. Sleep With Me has been featured in The New Yorker, The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

While Sleep With Me is an incredibly successful podcast, you'll see in this conversation that the success is no fluke. Drew has worked incredibly hard. Find out:

How did Drew motivate himself to finally get started, even after procrastinating for years. How did Drew use Motivational Judo to trick himself into making one episode after another? What self-talk did Drew use to keep himself going and finally quit his day job, even after making the podcast for three years, without pay?

This conversation is like a perfect blueprint of my latest book, The Heart to Start. If you've read the book, you'll see lots of familiar concepts playing out in Drew's story.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

http://skillshare.com/loveyourwork
http://weebly.com/loveyourwork
http://theprepared.com

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/drew-ackerman-interview/



89. 122. Writing a Book? 3 Things Nobody Told You
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/t... download (audio/mpeg, 9.25Mb)

Description:

I've written a couple of books now, and the process is nothing at all like I expected it would be. I think misconceptions about how to write a book prevent many people from writing their books. Just imagine all of the unwritten books that are locked up inside of people around the world because of these misconceptions.

So in this week's essay, I share what I wish I had known about writing a book.

By the way, I have a "short read" about how to write a book. It's called How to Write a Book. It's on Kindle, paperback, and it's now on Audible! So if you enjoy this essay, check out that short read. It takes less than an hour to read so it won't get in the way of you writing your book.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

http://theprepared.com

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/three-things-book-writing/



90. 121. Charlie Hoehn: Curing Anxiety Through Work/Life Integration
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/c... download (audio/mpeg, 40.40Mb)

Description:

Charlie Hoehn (@charliehoehn) was on top of the world. He was working with popular authors like Tim Ferriss and Ramit Sethi, and he was helping launch books to the top of the New York Times best-seller list.

The problem was, Charlie was miserable. His need to succeed drove him to sacrifice sleep and abuse performance-enhancing drugs. His body was breaking down, and he became crippled with anxiety.

Eventually, Charlie found a way out of anxiety, and a way into not just a healthy work/life balance, but a healthy work/life integration.

Charlie's secret weapon: Play. If you're anything like me, your initial thought is: Huh? Play? I don't need to play, I'm an adult!

Charlie is such an advocate of play that he's written two books about it: Play it Away and Play for a Living.

In this playful conversation with Charlie, you'll find out:

What does Charlie mean by "play?" I hadn't realized how central play was to my life and work until I had this conversation. How can play actually help you build skills? Being playful can sharpen your skills in reaching goals. How did Charlie overcome workaholism and adjust to a healthy relationship with a high-profile life?

We'll also talk about what Charlie learned working with Tim Ferriss, how to think up irresistible book titles, and the power of improv.

 

 

Sponsors

http://skillshare.com/loveyourwork
http://weebly.com/loveyourwork
http://theprepared.com

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/charlie-hoehn-podcast/



91. 120. Read "Free Range" Words
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/f... download (audio/mpeg, 4.71Mb)

Description:

I've talked on the show many times about how creative work gets paid for. The "free" mentality forces the hand of creators, and it's often not healthy for the people who read their words. Reading everything for free is like eating every meal at McDonald's.

I talk more about my own journey of avoiding "factory-farmed" words, instead buying "free range" words, in this week's article.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

http://theprepared.com

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/free-range-words/



92. 119. No Ego: Cy Wakeman on Eliminating "Emotional Waste"
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/c... download (audio/mpeg, 34.55Mb)

Description:

Cy Wakeman (@cywakeman) is the founder of Reality Based Leadership. She wrote a book called No Ego.

No Ego is a leadership book, which is an unusual read for me since I'm a solopreneur, but I couldn't put it down. You might hear me talk about ego from time to time. I think my conversation with Ryan Holiday back on episode 31 was the first time I was really thinking about ego. He wrote the book Ego is the Enemy.

Since then I've come to realize that ego is the number one enemy that can hold you back from reaching your creative potential. Your ego will keep you from being accountable to yourself and what you want to accomplish. It will direct your attention outside of you, and cause you to blame others. It will cause you to make limiting excuses for yourself.

But if you're able to bypass your own ego, something magical happens. You start to concentrate on what you can control. You start to see a connection between your actions and the results you get.

This is what I loved so much about Cy's book, No Ego. It's a powerful book for keeping ego from ruining your workplace, but at the same time it's a powerful book for keeping ego from ruining yourself and sabotaging your own potential.

Love Your Work now an Alexa Skill!

To add the Love Your Work skill to your Amazon Echo, say "Alexa, enable Love Your Work." It's very important, by the way to use the word "enable," and not "add." Also, you can search on the Alexa app, or visit kadavy.net/alexa

New Short Read: How to Write a Book I just published a little "book." It's more of a pamphlet, really. It's a Kindle Short Read called "How to Write a Book." It will show you how to use self motivation to overcome writer's block and make your book real. Buy How to Write a Book at kadavy.net/wab. Again, that's kadavy.net/wab

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

http://skillshare.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/cy-wakeman-podcast/



93. 118. Take Your Own Advice
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/t... download (audio/mpeg, 5.40Mb)

Description:

Today's essay is about the power of taking your own advice. I've got an interview coming up next week with Cy Wakeman (@cywakeman). Cy is the founder of "Reality Based Leadership." She wrote a book called No Ego, which I thoroughly enjoyed. Today's essay is based upon a quote from that book.

Love Your Work now an Alexa Skill!

To add the Love Your Work skill to your Amazon Echo, say "Alexa, enable Love Your Work." It's very important, by the way to use the word "enable," and not "add." Also, you can search on the Alexa app, or visit kadavy.net/alexa

New Short Read: How to Write a Book I just published a little "book." It's more of a pamphlet, really. It's a Kindle Short Read called "How to Write a Book." It will show you how to use self motivation to overcome writer's block and make your book real. Buy How to Write a Book at kadavy.net/wab. Again, that's kadavy.net/wab

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/take-your-own-advice-podcast/



94. 117. Maneesh Sethi: Upgrade Humanity. (Can blockchain & cryptocurrency end the eyeball economy?)
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/m... download (audio/mpeg, 65.72Mb)

Description:

I'm very glad to have my friend Maneesh Sethi back on the show. You first heard Maneesh way back on episode 13. Maneesh is the founder of Pavlok.

Pavlok started out as a wearable device that shocks you out of breaking bad habits. You may have heard me talk about using [Pavlok] to break my Facebook habit. It's very effective, because being shocked is not pleasant.

But what really excites me about what Maneesh is doing is he has a much larger mission. He says he wants Pavlok to "upgrade humanity." He wants to use technology to change behavior for the better.

The broken economics of technology products

The ill effects and broken economics of technology is a topic I've talked about often. I dreamt of a "behavioral revolution" wherein technology might change behavior for the better, back on episode 22.

But, I lamented that the economics were broken, something I debated with Nir Eyal, who is author of Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products back on episode 21.

Silicon Valley's ideas for how to fix technology

Now here's where I go on a long aside, and I might sound a little more angry than usual, but I think it's important.

Three years now after I first wrote about the behavioral revolution, there's starting to be buzz in the mainstream media about the ill effects of technology. I think the most recent election and the rise of fake news made people take notice, and they're starting to get it.

There was a recent piece in the New York Times, "Early Facebook and Google Employees Form Coalition to Fight What They Built," wherein many Silicon Valley elites are featured, talking about their "union of concerned experts called 'Center for Humane Technology.'"

Truthfully, I didn't read the whole article. Their mission is noble, but my general understanding of the topic is that they believe there should be a sort of designer's "code of ethics," that product designers would somehow magically follow. I say this because I've long been familiar with the work of Tristan Harris, who is the founder of the Center for Humane Technology. Tristan used to be an in-house ethicist at Google.

I did invite Tristan to be on the podcast a couple of years ago. There was talk of him coming on, but I think it eventually fell through the cracks for him. He's obviously had no problem finding more press exposure, with this New York Times piece.

He was even on Sam Harris's podcast, so you can listen to that one if you want to learn more.

I don't have anything to add to that conversation, though I was annoyed that the conversation was entirely focused on this idea of ethics, and there was no talk of the economics that force the hands of tech companies and the people who work at them.

Fix the economics of digital distraction

I believe ethics can only take you so far. As long as there are big companies that answer to shareholders, what is profitable will be what gets done. The larger an organization becomes, the less you can rely upon the consciences of the individual actors.

I shouldn't be surprised that the Silicon Valley elite are calling attention to themselves over the very problems they created, and coming up with what I think are hamfisted solutions for those problems.

After all, those of us with a conscience refused to do the damage in the first place. I left Silicon Valley more than ten years ago. It would be revisionist to say it was because of the damage technology was going to do.

I didn't know precisely where technology would lead, but I did know that after being involved in the initial excitement of the Web 2.0 movement, which was all about using technology to connect people, my work in tech felt increasingly without purpose nor positive impact. I talked more about these feelings in episode 16, entitled Earn it.

So, if the Silicon Valley elite had been able to detect the vacuousness of the companies they were building, if their hunger for meaning had been stronger than their hunger for wealth, they wouldn't be in the positions they are in. And since they ended up in these positions through this blindness, they're coming up with these inelegant solutions.

No, I don't think ethics will solve the problems of tech. I think the economics need to be fixed. As long as it is profitable to build products that divide us and affect our emotional and physical health, those are the products that are going to be made.

Blockchain may fix the broken economics of technology

But a shining star of hope has emerged, and that is blockchain technology.

Blockchain technology may enable what is good for us to become profitable.

I've talked about blockchain technology and its potential to fix these economics. I discussed it with Steemit CEO Ned Scott on episode 46, and have shared my experiences with earning from my writing in my Steemit tutorial on episode 110.

By the way, a Bloomberg columnist reached out to me based upon that Steemit tutorial. I was quoted in a Bloomberg article "Websites That Pay Users With Blockchain Aim to Disrupt Facebook."

My quote:

I feel like I’m in the Stone Age when I’m on Facebook or Twitter. They have no value without what you’re contributing to them. If Facebook doesn’t respond to this, things can change very quickly. They should be very concerned.

I explain a little more what I mean by that in my Steemit tutorial on episode 110. To sum it up: Blockchain platforms like Steemit are a community garden. Facebook is digital sharecropping.

I'm being a little harsh, and I even detect in myself some sour grapes here. There is some value to ethics, and I'm glad awareness is growing. I just think much better solutions are right under the noses of these powerful people. I can't tell you how annoying it is to me that Medium, for example, is holding onto this subscription model when the blockchain is right there.

Can Maneesh Sethi upgrade humanity with the blockchain?

So, enter Maneesh Sethi, and why I'm so glad that he is in the world. Maneesh is trying to incentivize good behavior with the blockchain. You can earn "volts" on the Pavlok mobile app, for tracking your sleep, doing a gratitude journal, or building pretty much any habit you wish.

As you'll hear in this conversation, Maneesh quietly built volts on the blockchain way back in 2014. His users have been earning volts, with no value, ever since. He tells me volts will actually be released as a cryptocurrency sometime later this year, meaning people could actually earn money building good habits and breaking bad habits. And also that the volts that they've already earned may suddenly become valuable. It's an attempt to fix the broken economics of technology.

It's huge, and exciting and I can't wait to see if it works.

This conversation is long, and rambly, like this intro, and we interrupt each other a lot. But, I love talking with Maneesh so I left it mostly unedited. Hopefully you appreciate some of the tangents we go on.

New Short Read: How to Write a Book I just published a little "book." It's more of a pamphlet, really. It's a Kindle Short Read called "How to Write a Book." It will show you how to use self motivation to overcome writer's block and make your book real. Buy How to Write a Book at kadavy.net/wab. Again, that's kadavy.net/wab.

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors: 

http://skillshare.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/maneesh-sethi/



95. 116. Make Creative Work Finish Itself with Cascading Motivation
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/c... download (audio/mpeg, 5.67Mb)

Description:

Big creative projects are daunting. It's hard to find the motivation to make them happen. I talk about a trick I use to make creative projects practically complete themselves. I call it cascading motivation, and it's the subject of this week's article.

New Short Read: How to Write a Book I just published a little "book." It's more of a pamphlet, really. It's a Kindle Short Read called "How to Write a Book." It will show you how to use self motivation to overcome writer's block and make your book real. Buy How to Write a Book at kadavy.net/wab. Again, that's kadavy.net/wab

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/cascading-motivation-podcast/



96. 115. White House Innovation Advisor Turned Sane "Prepper," John Ramey
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/j... download (audio/mpeg, 62.54Mb)

Description:

John Ramey (@jpramey) found success as an entrepreneur in Silicon Valley. He dropped out of college with only one semester left, moved to Silicon Valley, and built a successful startup.

After he sold his startup, John traveled the world helping budding ecosystems promote entrepreneurship. He ended up setting up a program called Nomadic Mentors, which pairs experienced entrepreneurs with incubator and accelerator programs around the world in developing markets.

By the way, I'm one of the mentors in Nomadic Mentors. I've done a trip to Greece and to Serbia where I spoke and helped entrepreneurs.

After John traveled the world, he served as the Innovation Advisor to the Obama White House. He set up a program at The Pentagon for making government innovation happen in months, rather than decades.

Now that John has had that success, has traveled the world, and has seen firsthand how governments work, including very intimately with the U.S. government, and a trip to North Korea that you're going to hear about, what is John dedicating his time to now?

He's actually running a site for "prepping." You may have seen some reality shows with shifty-eyed people prepping for nuclear fallout or a zombie apocalypse. This is not that.

John affectionately refers to himself as a SANE "prepper." If you go to his site, which is at theprepared.com you can see that John is quite sane. He provides incredibly-detailed and practical information on all sorts of disaster or emergency-preparedness supplies.

On theprepared.com you'll find prepping checklists for emergencies such as earthquakes, hurricanes, and car accidents. You'll find detailed reviews of supplies such as water storage containers and non-perishable food. You'll find everything you need to be informed on how best to prepare you, your family, and your home for an emergency.

This is a very long conversation. John has really seen The Matrix, so to speak, that rules our daily lives. Hear about:

How he lived in Silicon Valley on $2.85 a day. How did he end up working at the White House? What was his trip to North Korea like, and why wasn't he, as an American, allowed to use the bathroom on one ocassion? After all John has done, why has he decided a "prepper" site was the next project for him?

Self Motivation Webinar March 7th I'll be sharing my best self-motivation tips from over a decade as a solopreneur in my brand-new webinar, Self Motivation for Solopreneurs. It will be on Wednesday, March 7th 2018 at 3pm EST. Learn more and sign up at kadavy.net/motivation.

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/john-ramey/



97. 114. Eight Mantras for Getting Writing Done
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/e... download (audio/mpeg, 6.69Mb)

Description:

Getting writing done is a battle with your mind. If you're a perfectionist, it can be a very tough battle.

But if you have phrases you can tell yourself, you can win that battle. I think of them as "mantras." They're little things you can say to yourself when you get stuck. They'll keep you moving.

In today's article, I'll tell you eight mantras to overcome perfectionism and get writing done.

Buy The Heart to Start on Amazon You have something to offer the world. Break through fear, self-doubt, and distractions to finally make it real. Buy The Heart to Start.

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/eight-writing-mantras-podcast/



98. 113. 6-Figure Self-Publishing: Joanna Penn of The Creative Penn
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/j... download (audio/mpeg, 37.18Mb)

Description:

Joanna Penn (@thecreativepenn) is one of the leaders in helping self-published, or I should say "indie" authors, find their way. She has been self-publishing since 2009. She's written 27 books under 3 different pen names, and she earns a multi-six-figure income.

She writes about writing and running an indie author business at thecreativepenn.com, and she has a podcast called The Creative Penn.

Regular listeners know that I recently self-published for the first time. In the process of self-publishing, I've discovered a whole new world.

I used to think that self-publishing would be a step down for me. After all, I had a traditional publisher for my first book. It was nice to have the vote of confidence, and the advance check, from the publisher. And it was nice to have the support on editing, design, and distribution.

But it turns out there's more and more opportunity in self-publishing. You have full control over your writing, and you're going to be responsible for your most of your marketing anyway. You actually have more control over that as a self-published author.

There are more six-figure authors than ever. A recent survey from Written Word Media found that, in 2017, the number of authors making $100,000 or more jumped by 70%.

In this episode, you'll learn:

Why is "self-published" the wrong term. I keep saying "self-publishing," and I'll probably keep saying it, but Joanna prefers the term "indie author." Why is that? How can you hit the New York Times' best-seller list as an indie author? Joanna has done it. She explains why she thinks it's not such a big deal. Why have pen names? As I said Joanna publishes under three different names, which I think is a very cool and interesting way to break down creative resistance. But I was surprised to hear why she does it.

Buy The Heart to Start on Amazon You have something to offer the world. Break through fear, self-doubt, and distractions to finally make it real. Buy The Heart to Start.

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/joanna-penn-podcast/



99. 112. Never Stop Learning: The Skills of Self-Publishing
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/n... download (audio/mpeg, 10.01Mb)

Description:

As regular listeners know, I recently self-published for the first time. I traditionally-published my first book, Design for Hackers, and I had a good experience. I liked having the extra support for getting my book laid out and printed, and onto shelves around the world, and as a first-time author, I really needed the vote of confidence and accountability of a publishing contract.

But this time around, with my new book The Heart to Start, I had a lot to learn. Fortunately, it turned out that I had already built many of the skills I needed to self-publish.

I'm glad that I never stopped learning. Whether you dream of publishing a book, or of doing something else, today's article will help inspire you to keep learning.

Buy The Heart to Start on Amazon You have something to offer the world. Break through fear, self-doubt, and distractions to finally make it real. Buy The Heart to Start.

Donate on Patreon Love Your Work currently costs $260 a month to produce, and supporters are covering half of that! Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/never-stop-learning/



100. 111. Jordan Harbinger of The Jordan Harbinger Show (formerly The Art of Charm)
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/j... download (audio/mpeg, 23.48Mb)

Description:

Jordan Harbinger (@jordanharbinger) started out as a lawyer, but made a big change. You heard about another lawyer who made a career change, Jodi Ettenberg, back on episode 23. Jodi became a food and travel writer.

Jordan Harbinger did something different. He quit his job as a lawyer to become a podcaster. A very successful one at that. If you listen to podcasts, you've probably already heard The Art of Charm. (Jordan now hosts The Jordan Harbinger Show).

Jordan examines relationship-building and networking to be more effective in business, and in life.

The Art of Charm received a brief mention here on Love Your Work when Hollywood set designer JP Connelly shared his favorite podcasts on episode 91. In this episode, Jordan shares:

Law is a prestigious profession with a rich history. Did Jordan hesitate to start podcasting instead? Jordan has interviewed folks such as Shaquille O'Neil, Larry King, and Robert Cialdini. How does he connect with influencers, and how can you do the same? When it comes to building a platform such as a podcast, what really makes a difference in growing the show?

Buy The Heart to Start on Amazon You have something to offer the world. Break through fear, self-doubt, and distractions to finally make it real. Buy The Heart to Start.

Donate on Patreon Love Your Work currently costs $260 a month to produce, and supporters are covering half of that! Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/jordan-harbinger-podcast-interview/



101. 110. Making Money on STEEM and Steemit: A Beginner's Guide to Earning Cryptocurrency on the Blockchain
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/s... download (audio/mpeg, 20.00Mb)

Description:

Something that has been on the top of my mind the past few years is how creators can make an honest living from their work. You heard me talk with Hooked author Nir Eyal back on episode 21 about how technology is fragmenting attention, for example. These economics incentivize creators to be outlandish or even dishonest.

But, the blockchain and cryptocurrencies may change all of that. I've been earning money for my writing lately on the STEEM blockchain, on a social network called Steemit. You heard me talk to STEEM's CEO, Ned Scott back on episode 71.

I recently cashed in over $1,000 in STEEM cryptocurrency. Today I'll be giving a basic introduction to making money on Steemit. You'll learn:

Where does the money come from? I cash in the STEEM Tokens I earn, but why are they worth anything? What are the various forms of STEEM, and what are they for? I'll talk about STEEM, STEEM Power, and STEEM Dollars. Once you earn STEEM, how can you convert it to USD? I'll give you the gist in this episode, but for step-by-step instructions, visit the original post for my beginner's guide to STEEM

Buy The Heart to Start on Amazon You have something to offer the world. Break through fear, self-doubt, and distractions to finally make it real. Buy The Heart to Start.

Donate on Patreon Love Your Work currently costs $260 a month to produce, and supporters are covering almost half of that! Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/steem-beginners-podcast/



102. BONUS: Listen to The Heart to Start audiobook free on Audible (visit: kadavy.net/audible)
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 2.48Mb)

Description:

Join Audible and listen to The Heart to Start free at http://kadavy.net/audible

Hey there, just wanted to let you know that the audiobook version of The Heart to Start is now available on Audible!
 
I know many of you have been anticipating this, as audio is such a convenient medium – it probably explains why many of you discovered my work through my podcast.
 
If you sign up over here as a first-time Audible customer, you will get a 30-day trial, in which you can pick The Heart to Start as your trial book.
 
By the way, signing up through my link helps support my work. I'll earn a $5 bounty if you sign up for the free trial, and if you choose HTS as your first book AND become a customer of Audible for at least 61 days, I'll earn another $50 bounty. Here's the link again.


103. 109. Die Empty. Todd Henry of The Accidental Creative
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/t... download (audio/mpeg, 18.01Mb)

Description:

Todd Henry (@toddhenry) has written a ton of books. My personal favorite is called Die Empty, and it's all about finding the urgency to pursue your creative destiny. His newest book is called Herding Tigers, and it's all about leading creative people so they can do their best work.

He also has a great podcast called The Accidental Creative. In fact, he interviewed me on the show, and you can listen to it over here.

In this episode, we'll talk about:

The different kinds of work: What is making, mapping, and meshing? What's your style when it comes to executing your ideas? If you're weak on one kind of work, and strong on another, what's the result? And how do great creative leaders create an environment where their people can be creative and effective? The killer tip from this is that "great leaders have great rituals."

Buy The Heart to Start on Amazon You have something to offer the world. Break through fear, self-doubt, and distractions to finally make it real. Buy The Heart to Start.

 

 

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/toddy-henry-podcast/



104. 108. Start Your Masterpiece in 2018: Three Easy Ways
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/2... download (audio/mpeg, 5.18Mb)

Description:

We're in only the second week of 2018. There's optimism in the air, and you have a fresh well of energy and motivation for making change in your life.

Have you thought about starting something? Maybe you want to start writing, or you want to start a company. How can you make 2018 the year you finally get started? I'll share three easy ways in today's article.

Buy The Heart to Start on Amazon You have something to offer the world. Break through fear, self-doubt, and distractions to finally make it real. Buy The Heart to Start.

Donate on Patreon Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/2018-get-started/



105. 107. Build Good Habits: Stanford Behavioral Scientist BJ Fogg
https://kadavy.net/blog/posts/... download (audio/mpeg, 47.33Mb)

Description:

BJ Fogg (@bjfogg) is a behavioral scientist at Stanford University. He specializes in "Behavior Design," which aims to influence people for the better through insights about human behavior. In this podcast episode, BJ breaks down how to build good habits.

Why do we fail to build good habits?

Most resolutions to build good habits fail for two reasons:

We think too vaguely. We think things like "I want to eat healthier" or "I want to lose weight." If you want to make something a reality you have to break it down into actions. Specificity makes behavior easier to change. Our motivation changes. You might start off trying to build good habits and feel very motivated, but your motivation will wane. You may have felt very motivated by something – such as the New Year – but that will pass. Or, life gets in the way, and that causes your priorities to change. What are some of the hardest good habits to build?

What is a good habit? Well, that's up to you. But some of the most common good habits that people want to build are writing, and meditation. Yet they're the hardest.

It's up to you what you consider to be a good habit. If you need help deciding on one popular habit: Should you make your bed? I've got you covered with that episode.

Since I wrote a book about building writing habits with the aim of writing a book, I'll use that as an example to apply BJ's concepts in this post.

The "swarm of bees" approach to build good habits

We fail to build good habits because we think to vaguely. For example, we might say we want to write a book. You can't just sit down and write a book, especially if you're a beginning writer. An even more vague goal you might hear from people is that they want to "eat healthy."

Neither of these are habits. These are outcomes. They are the results of taking actions, but they aren't actions themselves. So, it becomes mentally impossible to use them to "build good habits," if you aren't intentional about it.

Fogg uses a concept, in his tiny habits training program, he calls the "swarm of bees."

You start with your vague outcome. Fogg calls it an "aspiration." Write it down on a piece of paper. Then, write down a bunch of behaviors you could do that would help lead to that aspiration. It looks like this slide from Fogg's TEDx talk.

[caption id="attachment_4474" align="aligncenter" width="750"] The "swarm of bees" is an outcome surrounded by behaviors that could lead to that outcome.[/caption]

In this slide, the aspiration is "health outcomes," which could be something like losing weight. Let's think of the swarm of bees as something like writing a book.

Outcome: Write a book Behaviors Sit at computer. Put fingers on keyboard. Type. Read about how to write a book. Read about how to publish a book. Do market research. and so on... Not all behaviors are habits: Three categories of behaviors

As you come up with behaviors to match your aspiration, you'll find each behavior falls into one of three categories:

One-time behaviors: Things you do just once, such as buy a book or schedule an appointment. Behaviors over a period of time: Things you do over a period of time, such as mow the lawn regularly over the summer. Habits: Things you do habitually with no time restriction. Brushing your teeth, meditating, or writing. Pick behaviors that are a good match for you, to build good habits

Now you have an outcome you want to reach, and you have a list of behaviors that will bring you closer to that outcome. Next, you need to pick a behavior that you can build into a good habit.

But you don't want to pick just any behavior. If you want to build good habits, the behavior has to be a good match.

Fogg recommends choosing a behavior with the following three characteristics:

The behavior has an impact: A good behavior will take you toward your aspiration. Since you already did the swarm of bees exercise, this will be a given. The behavior is something you can do: The good match for you is a behavior that you're capable of doing. If you’re a beginning writer trying to write a book, trying to build a habit of writing 5,000 words a day might be too much. The behavior is something you want to do: If you don't want to do the behavior, you can't build it into a good habit. How many days does it take to build a good habit? It depends!

Despite what you might hear about how long it takes to build a good habit, there is no set number of times or days. (Commonly you hear the myth of “21 days” to build a good habit.)

It really depends upon the habit you’re building. Some habits are instant: The moment you touched a smart phone, using it became a habit. When Fogg got a new rocking chair, sitting in it instantly became a habit, because it was so much better than his other chair. Other habits can take more time to take root.

Good habits are like the roots of a plant

More accurately, both good habits and bad habits are like the roots of a plant. Any plant needs to take root in order to survive. You want to pull the weeds (the bad habits) before their roots get too strong, and you want to nurture the good plants (the good habits) so they can take root and thrive for a long time.

If you have a good habit going, but your life gets disrupted, you should take extra care to help that habit take root in your new circumstances. Think of it how you would think of moving a plant from one pot to another – it would need extra care.

Good habits change your personal identity

When you've built a good habit, meaning it's firmly rooted, it changes your personal identity. You start to tell yourself, "I'm the kind of person who...."

Now that I've personally established a habit of writing, I'm more confident in my identity as a writer. "I'm the kind of person who writes." I write every morning during my pre-established writing habit, but now I can write anytime.

Good habits have a "ripple effect." They lead to more good habits.

Fogg has helped thousands of people build good habits through his tiny habits program. He collects data on the effects building good habits on these people.

Fogg has found that, within five days after starting to build one good habit, eighty percent of people start building other habits. They apparently say to themselves, "I'm the kind of person who builds good habits."

Consistency matters more than scale in building good habits

When you're trying to build good habits, consistency matters more than scale. For example, if you have a habit of writing 100 words a day, and you're able to do it every day, that's better than if you try to build a habit of writing 1,000 words a day, but you're only able to do it occasionally.

Why? Because if you keep writing 100 words a day, the habit has a chance to take root. It goes from being a behavior you do for a short period of time, to being a habit that you stick with.

You really know something is a habit if it is easier to do the habit than it is to not do the habit. Think about habits like brushing your teeth or bathing. You don't feel right if you don't do them. They're strongly-rooted habits. It's a part of your identity. "[You're] the kind of person who brushes their teeth."

Back to the writing habit: If you try to write 1,000 words a day, it's hard to remain consistent early on. It's easy to make excuses such as that you're too busy. You can't be consistent, so the habit can't take root.

Tiny habits are the seeds of good habits

Consistency is more important than scale. A small behavior done consistently has a better chance of taking root and changing your identity than a large behavior done inconsistently. This is why Fogg recommends tiny habits. Tiny habits are the seeds of good habits.

I've been talking in this post about how much better it would be to build a 100-word writing habit than to try to build a 1,000-word writing habit. Those 100 words would be the seed that takes root. Your identity changes. You're the kind of person who writes every day. The next thing you know, you're writing much more.

Feel good about your habit, don't feel bad about your habit

For a habit to take root, you have to be consistent with it. You'll have a better chance of being consistent with your habit if you feel good about that habit.

So find ways to feel good about your habit, and avoid ways that make you feel bad about your habit. Here's a few ways to keep you feeling good about your habit, and avoid feeling bad about your habit.

Keep your good habit a tiny habit

If you want to feel good about your habit, it helps to succeed at your habit. Fogg strongly recommends that you keep your habit tiny forever. It's counterintuitive. After all, if you want to write a book, how are you going to do it by writing just 100 words a day?

The key is to allow yourself to do your habit beyond your target. So, if you have a habit of writing 100 words a day, go ahead and write 250 words, or 1,000 words. But keep your target at 100.

I will say that I make a contradictory recommendation in my post, how to write a book. There's value as a writer to getting really good at writing pieces of a certain length. There's also value in building the habit of publishing. It would be incredibly complicated to study these factors, along with the factor of word count, to make a scientific recommendation on what works best.

So, Fogg still staunchly stands by keeping your habit tiny. He's a scientist, and that's what he knows works.

Congratulate yourself for performing your good habit

Every time you do your habit, celebrate in some way. You could have a reward for yourself, but you can also merely tell yourself that you did a good job. This will keep you feeling good about your habit, and prevent you from feeling bad about your habit.

In the writing example, let's say you have a tough day of writing. But, you wrote 100 words. Don't feel bad. Instead, congratulate yourself for performing your good habit for the day. Again, if you go past 100 words, that's great, but really congratulate yourself for merely writing 100 words.

Lower your standards to feel good about your habit

Ambitious people tend to have high standards. Not only do they want to write 1,000 words a day, they expect those words to be great.

This just adds another opportunity to feel like you've failed at your habit. Worse yet, you may keep yourself from starting your habit in the first place.

This is why, in my book The Heart to Start, I say you should give yourself "permission to suck." If you're writing badly every day, you have a much better chance of becoming good at writing if you instead decide not to write at all, just because you don't think you're a good writer.

You'd find yourself in a Catch-22 situation: You can't get good at writing because you won't practice it. You won't practice writing because you don't feel that you're good at it.

Don't count habit "streaks"

Fogg recommends against counting "streaks," for your habits. Habit streaks create another opportunity for you to feel bad about your habit, which can lead to you not performing the behavior, which can prevent the habit from taking root.

Imagine, for example, that you have a good habit of writing 100 words a day, and you’ve counted a streak of twenty days. Then, you miss your habit for some reason – maybe you were sick or you had house guests.

Now, not only do you feel bad about missing your streak, you also have the sensation of starting your streak all over again. It’s as if you’re committing to 10,000 words, rather than 100. It would then be easy to abandon your good habit altogether.

In summary... Find behaviors that fit your aspiration. From those behaviors, find a good habit match. Build tiny habits. Feel good about your habits. Don't feel bad about your habits.

Buy The Heart to Start on Amazon You have something to offer the world. Break through fear, self-doubt, and distractions to finally make it real. Buy The Heart to Start.

Join Love Your Work Elite Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show Notes: https://kadavy.net/blog/posts/build-good-habits/



106. 106. Sample Chapter: The Linear Work Distortion
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/l... download (audio/mpeg, 10.84Mb)

Description:

Many of you have checked out my new book The Heart to Start. I got tired of hearing the advice "just get started," and I wanted to break it down for people. It shows you how to bust through all of the mental distortions and distractions that stand in the way of you getting started.

Today, I'm going to share another sample chapter. This is from Chapter 10 of The Heart to Start, and I'm going to tell you about when I got stuck trying to start writing my first book, Design for Hackers. Our friend Noah Kagan, who you've heard on this show, ended up showing me how I was standing in my own way.

You can buy The Heart to Start on Amazon. There's now a paperback version, so if you picked it up on Kindle and want a physical copy, now you can do that. Also, I really truly appreciate all of the reviews that have been pouring in on Amazon.

If you've read The Heart to Start, please click on a star rating on Amazon. It would be a HUGE help.

Join Love Your Work Elite Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors:

http://brandfolder.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/linear-work-distortion-podcast/



107. 105. Are You an Old Master, or a Young Genius? David W. Galenson.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/d... download (audio/mpeg, 36.63Mb)

Description:

David W. Galenson is an economics professor at The University of Chicago. He's also a visiting professor at other schools, such as MIT. David is an unusual economist in that he studies the economics of art.

Have you ever noticed how some young geniuses have rapid success? Have you wondered when your work will finally get noticed?

It turns out, there are two totally different approaches to making your art, and the approach that you take can drastically affect when you'll find success.

I recently picked up David's book, Old Masters and Young Geniuses: The Two Life Cycles of Artistic Creativity, and I found it so fascinating, I had to have him on the show.

David's theory is that there are two totally different approaches to making one's art: You might be a conceptual innovator, in that you take a concept and run with it. Or, you might be an experimental innovator – you might be tweaking for a lifetime, trying to figure something out.

You may have heard about Galenson's work on Malcolm Gladwell's podcast, Revisionist History. There's an episode that uses Galenson's theory to explain why Leonard Cohen's song, Hallelujah took so long to become popular.

In this talk, you'll learn:

What makes someone a conceptual innovator? What about an experimental innovator? Who are some well known innovators in each category? You'll hear about Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, Bob Dylan, Picasso, Alfred Hitchcock, and many more. Can you change your innovation style? Or are you just better off embracing your style?

Join Love Your Work Elite Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors:

http://skillshare.com/loveyourwork
http://readwise.io/heart
http://brandfolder.com/loveyourwork

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/david-galenson/



108. 104. Preview My New Book: The Heart to Start
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/h... download (audio/mpeg, 10.43Mb)

Description:

Today, I'm very happy to announce that I have a new book out. Have you ever heard the advice "just get started?" Have you ever been left wondering "yeah, but how?"

This was me when I was first starting on my own. I knew that the best way to make progress toward my dreams was to just get started. But that seemed easier said than done. It seemed each time I tried to start, I'd run into a fear, or a self-doubt, or I'd find a way to procrastinate.

My new book is called "The Heart to Start: Win the Inner War & Let Your Art Shine". It's available right now on Amazon at kadavy.net/heart. Please, please go get this book. It's the result of a lifetime of learning, and many months of work. It's short and to the point, and I really think it will help you reach your potential.

Thank you to all of the early readers of the book. Many people provided feedback and edits, and I could not have made the book what it is without you.

After you check out the book, I'd deeply appreciate an Amazon review. Especially those of you who have already read it. I've probably already asked you for a review, but I want to remind you – please, please write a review on Amazon.

When you have a book on Amazon, reviews are everything. You've gotta have reviews, because they help boost the book in Amazon's discovery engine. So when someone is looking at a related book, they see The Heart to Start. So please buy the book, and please leave an honest review. Again, you can find it at kadavy.net/heart.

And I'll have a sample chapter for you on today's show.

Mockup credit

Join Love Your Work Elite Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

http://brandfolder.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/heart-to-start-mockup/



109. 103. Turn Rejection into Opportunity. Libryia Jones of Wanderist.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/l... download (audio/mpeg, 41.91Mb)

Description:

Libryia Jones (@wanderwomanic) has made it easier for people to have the experience of living in different places. Last year, she organized a trip for her and and more than thirty others to spend a year on the road. They lived in places like Prague, Cape Town, and my personal favorite, Medellin.

If you've been listening to this show for awhile, you know that I'm a big advocate of travel. More accurately I'm a big advocate of mini-lives – living on a different place for a month or more at a time. It's a great way to grow and it just makes life interesting.

But travel isn't always easy. You have to find a place to live and work, and it can be more fun if you have others to share the experience with.

Libryia's company, Wanderist is organizing another trip. In fact, there are two opportunities to come through Medellin, so hopefully some listeners will check it out.

In this conversation, we'll talk about:

How did Libryia turn rejection into opportunity? She wasn't able to travel in other programs, so she made her own program. How does Libryia travel, even as a single mother? She has a refreshing point-of-view about seeing parenthood as a source of inspiration, rather than as a limitation. When you travel, you want to be safe. How does Libryia think about traveling to places that others might see as dangerous?

Join Love Your Work Elite Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors 

http://skillshare.com/loveyourwork
http://readwise.io/loveyourwork
http://brandfolder.com/loveyourwork

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/libryia-jones/



110. 102. Use the Seven Mental States to Optimize Your Creative Output
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/s... download (audio/mpeg, 8.35Mb)

Description:

The past several years, I've been really fascinated with optimizing creative output. It all started when I wrote my first book, Design for Hackers. I had been creative on command working as a professional designer, but when it came time to write a book, it was harder than ever.

Since then, I've noticed that if I arrange my life and work according to mental states, I can be sure that I do my most important creative work during my peak creative time. I can then arrange the rest of my life and work to serve that peak creative output.

Join Love Your Work Elite

Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments?

I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/seven-mental-states-podcast/



111. 101. Pat Flynn: Teach While You Learn
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/p... download (audio/mpeg, 39.09Mb)

Description:

One of the key things that I did early on in my career as an independent creator was set up passive revenue streams.

If it wasn't for this passive revenue, I never would have been able to free up the time to explore, so I never would have come up with my first book, Design for Hackers, and I probably never would have found the time to make this show.

I looked at the passive revenue as a way to explore other things. I didn't make it a part of my personal brand, so to speak. In fact, one of my passive revenue streams was an online dating blog that I wrote under a pseudonym.

Our guest today, Pat Flynn (@patflynn), has a different approach. He's all about the passive revenue. He's been setting up passive revenue streams since 2008. He started with a training e-book for an architecture exam, and he's got a security guard training website, courses for marketing a food truck business, podcast playing software for podcast websites, so many more things, including his latest book, Will it Fly, a Wall Street Journal best-seller, which shares what he's learned about knowing whether a new business endeavor is worth following.

Pat has been sharing his income reports every month since he started. These days he's earning close to a quarter of a million dollars a month, with all of the businesses I mentioned, and more, including his extremely popular podcast, Smart Passive Income.

In this conversation, we'll talk about:

How did Pat start making money by sharing what he was learning? You can learn a lot about why you don't have to be a so-called expert to help people. Pat went from the well-established profession of architecture, to making money online. What leaps did he have to make to transition from a profession that was so important to his identity? How does Pat think about transparency? What gave him the idea to start sharing his income reports online?

Join Love Your Work Elite Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors:

http://skillshare.com/loveyourwork

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/pat-flynn-podcast-interview/



112. 100. Find Your Calling. (SPECIAL 100th episode!! Featuring James Altucher, Dan Ariely, Jason Fried, Seth Godin, & more)
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/f... download (audio/mpeg, 15.46Mb)

Description:

For this very special 100th episode of Love Your Work: How do you find your calling? I've been trying to get to the bottom of this over the past two years, and I think it boils down to a three-step formula that I'll present in this special episode.

Discover

To find your calling, you need to discover what it is you want to pursue. Usually, it seems, you don't just wake up one day and know what it is you want to do. It can come from different sources.

Don't let your dreams hold you back. Let them evolve. (Listen to Peter Bragiel's episode) Don't let the expectations of others drown out your inner voice. (Listen to Jason Fried's episode) Turn your weaknesses into a superpower. (Listen to Maneesh Sethi's episode) Decide

If you're going to find your calling, you need to decide to pursue it. The chance of success needs to be more compelling than the alternatives.

Bounce back from rock-bottom. (Listen to Elise Bauer's episode) Put the risk in perspective. (Listen to Laura Roeder's episode) Make measured changes. (Listen to Jeff Goins's episode) Do

Once you've discovered your calling, and you've decided you're going to pursue it, you have to actually do it. But how do you break through all of the fear and distractions to make it happen.

Make the most of your best mental energy. (Listen to Dan Ariely's episode) Scale back your goals. (Listen to Seth Godin's episode) Have a clear picture of success. (Listen to Tucker Max's episode) Just do it. That's how you get things done. (Listen to Jame Altucher's episode)

 

Join Love Your Work Elite Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/find-your-calling/



113. 99. Michelangelo's Creative Process. Ross King, author of The Pope's Ceiling
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/m... download (audio/mpeg, 34.57Mb)

Description:

Ross King is author of the book The Pope's Ceiling. It tells the story of just how Michelangelo managed to paint 12,000 square feet of ceiling with little or no experience as a painter.

I think there's a dangerous belief in creative work. And that is the belief that certain artists are simply gifted, and that that alone explains their greatness.

It's easy to look up at the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel and conclude that Michelangelo lived up to his reputation as the "divine one." That he wasn't human. That he was actually a god of sorts. Today, we'll talk about the process that Michelangelo actually took to complete this seemingly impossible masterpiece.

In this conversation, you'll learn:

How did Michelangelo curate his reputation as a "divine" painter. He really wanted people to believe that, and he shaped that perception. Michelangelo started painting the ceiling with little or no painting experience. He knew he would have failures along the way. How did he turn his failures into success in the project? Even though Michelangelo didn't have experience as a painter, he had built up a bag of tricks to draw from. Learn how he used his other experiences to make his first attempt at painting a success.

Join Love Your Work Elite Support the show, get early access to episodes, bonus masterclasses, office hours with me, and a discount on the Love Your Work T-shirt. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

http://skillshare.com/loveyourwork

http://storyblocks.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/michelangelo-creative-process/

 



114. 98. Find Your Creative City
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/c... download (audio/mpeg, 9.13Mb)

Description:

About two years ago, I was on a retreat in Mexico with some friends. We were each exploring what we wanted to do in our lives and careers. It took all week for me to admit it to myself: I wanted to double down on being a creator. I wanted to have conversations on this podcast, read books, and write books.

I wanted to make my creative output the top priority in my life. So, I moved off to Colombia to set up everything so that I could be fully-focused.

I had spent a lot of time in Medellín before, during a few "mini lives" I had done here. I always found that I got more work done here, and that it was better work, too.

So, as I was doubling down on being a creator, Medellín was the clear choice.

In this article, I'll share with you how I picked the city where I could have the best creative output. Whether you feel like moving to another country or not, it will give you things to think about in optimizing your own creative output.

Join Love Your Work Elite Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

http://storyblocks.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/creative-city-podcast/



115. 97. A Tale of Two Bootstrappers. Rob Hunter of Focused Apps & David Kadavy
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/t... download (audio/mpeg, 41.59Mb)

Description:

Rob Hunter (@vegashacker) and I met ten years ago in a cafe. Well, I met him on Craigslist, really, but then we met in person in a cafe. We had both left our jobs at the same time. We were both determined to make it on our own.

So, we spent several months wandering from cafe to cafe in San Francisco. We'd put in twelve hour days, not making a dime, and it was one of the most exciting times in my life.

Today, I have this podcast, a best-selling book, another book on the way, and I can live wherever I want. Today, Rob is one half of Focused Apps. Their hit iOS games include Hit Tennis, and Emoji Me, which has 40 million downloads. Rob is also location independent.

We both left our jobs at the same time. We both wanted to make it. But as you'll see in this episode, we had two very different mindsets, different approaches, and different paths.

Listen to this episode to learn:

When you start on your own, you better have some kind of vision of where you're going. What did we expect to achieve from the beginning? Starting on your own is a risk. How did each of us think about risk, and what our options were? How did that shape our approaches? When did we finally feel like we "made it?" How did we finally get there?

About HALF of this conversation hit the cutting-room floor, so if you're an LYW Elite member, watch out for the uncut episode with bonus material. I focused this episode around our different approaches and paths, but in the bonus material Rob shares his lessons learned from making many, many, apps that didn't work, as well as a couple that did.

LAST CHANCE to get the Love Your Work T-Shirt 30% off when you Join Love Your Work Elite Through October 31st, get a coupon for 30% off the new Love Your Work T-Shirt when you join Love Your Work Elite. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

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Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/two-boostrappers/



116. 96. Mini-life case study: One couple, 6 months in Medellín
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/m... download (audio/mpeg, 10.85Mb)

Description:

I've talked a little on this show – especially in the early days – about the idea of "mini-lives". Basically, you go live your normal life in another city for a month, or two months.

Or, in the case of our guests today, about six months. Mike and Megan left their jobs in Washington DC, and before they decided to go anywhere else, they wanted to live a mini life.

And, they came to Medellín. I sat down with them in a cafe to hear their story. You're going to hear:

Their philosophy behind living a mini-life. What did they want to get from the experience? How did they make the decision that the financial investment was worth it for them? What have they learned from the experience? How has it really tested them?

If you've been considering planning a mini-life, check out the bonus content for this episode on LYW Elite. About twenty minutes of this conversation ended up on the cutting-room floor. I shared some tips I've learned over the years for planning a successful mini-life.

Get the Love Your Work T-Shirt 30% off when you Join Love Your Work Elite

From now through October 31st, get a coupon for 30% off the new Love Your Work T-Shirt when you join Love Your Work Elite. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments?

I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

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Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/mini-life-medellin/



117. 95. Be Productively Curious. Ian Leslie, author of "Curious: The Desire to Know, and Why Your Future Depends On It"
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/i... download (audio/mpeg, 43.70Mb)

Description:

Ian Leslie (@mrianleslie) is author of Curious: The Desire to Know, and Why Your Future Depends On It.

If you've ever had a lot of free time, you know how scary it can be. The very first day that I was on my own, more than ten years ago, I woke up to just vastness. I had a whole day ahead of me that I needed to fill up with something. I figured I'd have the best shot of making it if I just followed my curiosity.

I figured if I started with curiosity, I could keep myself from getting off track and wasting time. I also figured I would end up somewhere special, and most importantly, I'd be doing something I loved.

So I followed my curiosity and I ended up combining my interests in design, in programming, and in entrepreneurship. That became my first book, Design for Hackers.

Following your curiosity can be really powerful, but how do you deal with having disparate curiosities? How do you make sure you're being productively curious?

Ian wrote the book on being productively curious. In Curious, Ian Leslie explains what curiosity is, why it's important, and why there's a growing curiosity divide: Some people are getting curious, while others are getting less curious. The more curious will be at a distinct advantage as the world gets more complex, and traditional work gets more scarce.

In this conversation, we'll talk about:

What's the difference between diversive curiosity and epistemic curiosity? One can get us off track, while the other can really pay off. If you have lots of varied interests, how do manage your curiosity? You want curiosity to pay off, but you don't want to be merely distracting yourself from being productive. A popular opinion these days is that you shouldn't bother memorizing anything, because you can look it up. Ian explains why he disagrees with this. Learn why a well-stocked mind is your best tool for breakthrough insights.

I talked to Ian for more than an hour, but that's more than we were able to put in the show today. We pay by the minute for editing the podcast, so we edited the conversation down to the most critical elements about being productively curious.

But, if you are a Love Your Work Elite member, be sure to listen to the full, uncut interview for some bonus listening.

There are some GEMS in there. In particular, towards the end, I asked Ian how he thinks about writing book proposals. I've struggled myself with writing book proposals. It seems like you have to write the whole book, before you can write the proposal, before you can get the book deal to write the book for real.

Get the Love Your Work T-Shirt 30% off when you Join Love Your Work Elite

From now through October 31st, get a coupon for 30% off the new Love Your Work T-Shirt when you join Love Your Work Elite. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments?

I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

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Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/ian-leslie-interview/



118. 94. In Ten Years, Will You be Glad?
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/t... download (audio/mpeg, 39.17Mb)

Description:

I recently passed my tenth year as a self-employed independent creator. I don't recommend it.

I say that, and some people don't believe me. When I wrote this post that I'm sharing on today's show, some people thought it was some kind of a click-bait strategy.

I think it's because this post kind of takes a turn. It starts off sounding a little grim, but it ends up sounding hopeful.

The thing is, I never expected so many people to read this post. As of right now, it has over 46,000 views on Medium.

When I sat down to write this a couple of months ago, as my tenth anniversary was approaching, I did so with genuine questions in my mind. I wanted to know if I had made a horrible mistake. I wanted to find out if I had been fooling myself.

It was really a journal entry for myself. I didn't submit it to any publications, where it was sure to be read. But, sharing some of my most uncomfortable thoughts is my job as a writer. So, I just put it on my main feed on Medium. At least it was out there, but I wasn't thrusting it into the world.

Publishing this post was a lesson that the power of a post is enough to carry it. I think it's easy to forget that when the popular wisdom is to make sure you share on all of your social channels, and ask people to upvote, and maybe even send it to your friends. I did none of those things, and this one still took off.

Join Love Your Work Elite

Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments?

I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/ten-years-podcast/

 



119. 93. Art is Your Job. Creator of NBC's The Blacklist, Jon Bokenkamp, on screenwriting
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/j... download (audio/mpeg, 52.57Mb)

Description:

Jon Bokenkamp (@jonbokenkamp) wanted to be a screenwriter. So, he decided it was his job. He sat at his desk from nine to five every day, writing frantically, and each night he went to another job. One that paid him. He waited tables.

After three years, he sold his first screenplay. Then he sold some others here and there. Then the phone stopped ringing. After one failed script, he was contractually obligated to write one more.

That script became The Blacklist (Netflix). It's a thriller on NBC starring James Spader. They're starting their fifth season this week.

Spader plays Reddington, a veteran, private-jet-setting criminal who acts as an informant to the FBI, and who has a puzzling interest in agent Elizabeth Keen, played by Megan Boone.

In this conversation, we're going to learn:

What was the mindset that Jon put himself in to make it through the three-year project of writing his first screenplay? How does Jon ward off his distractibility, and channel it into his writing method? I think it's a great lesson in how in creative work, the final product is totally different from the process used to get there. How has Jon's writing process changed now that he has a whole team, and basically has to write a movie a week?

Jon is a Nebraska-native like me. Hopefully you won't mind listening to us reminisce a little about that strange place in the beginning. If not, skip ahead, and you'll hear some really great stuff on doing tough and long creative projects.

Image: Flickr user Thibault

 

 

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Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/jon-bokenkamp-the-blacklist-interview/ 



120. 92. Listen to "The Voice"
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/t... download (audio/mpeg, 12.59Mb)

Description:

I'm working on a new book. It's called Getting Art Done, and it's going to help you boost your creative productivity and make your masterpiece.

Today I'm going to read a sample chapter from the first draft of Getting Art Done. It's about the voice inside your head, and how it can lead to your most explosive ideas.

To learn more and preview Getting Art Done, visit gettingartdone.com.

Join Love Your Work Elite Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/the-voice-podcast/



121. 91. Emmy-award winning set designer for Bill Nye, Martha Stewart, & Snoop Dogg, James Pearse Connelly
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/j... download (audio/mpeg, 41.34Mb)

Description:

James Pearse Connelly (@jpconnelly, Instagram: @jpconnelly) is an Emmy-Award-winning television set designer. He's designed sets for shows like Bill Nye Saves the World, Martha & Snoop's Potluck Dinner Party, The Voice, and Top Chef.

I wanted to have James on the show to learn how he does creativity on a large scale, with literally moving parts, and an unforgiving production schedule. I figured that to do what James does, which is express the feel of a show through architecture and materials and fabrics and furniture, and to deliver on-time, James must really know his creative process. And you can tell from this conversation, he really does.

Even if you aren't a designer, chances are you work on creative projects all of the time that have lots of unknowns in the beginning. The work James does just puts a magnifying glass on what it takes to make creative work come with less pain, no matter what medium you're working in.

In this show, you'll learn:

How do you create a design that supports an idea and serves the client, rather than one that just follows trends. How does James manage his creative vision across a whole staff? We'll really get inside James's head for some of his best set designs. How does he integrate a subtle design language into his concepts? This was a really fun part of the conversation because you'll see how designers "talk" using subtle cues in their work. In this case, I think you'll be surprised all you can glean from a spiral staircase.

Join Love Your Work Elite

I'll be holding an office hours hangout for LYW Elite members, NEXT TUESDAY, September 19th, 8pm. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments?

I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/james-pearse-connelly/

 



122. 90. Success Favors Those Who Ship
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/s... download (audio/mpeg, 9.39Mb)

Description:

I've been working on a new book called Getting Art Done. Today, I'm going to share with you a chapter from the first draft of the book.

This chapter about the importance of shipping your work. It's easy to fantasize about what a great creator you will be one day, while never really finishing your work in the present day.

If you make it a point to ship work, won't the quality suffer? I share what I've learned by examining the paths of great creators, and what I learned by making a point of shipping myself.

Join Love Your Work Elite

I'll be holding an office hours hangout for LYW Elite members, September 19th, 8pm. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments?

I love to hear anything and everything from you. Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/success-ship-podcast/



123. 89. Lead minds, not hands. L. David Marquet, author of Turn The Ship Around
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/l... download (audio/mpeg, 51.04Mb)

Description:

L. David Marquet (@ldavidmarquet) had spent a year preparing to captain a submarine in the U.S. Navy. But at the last minute, he was assigned to a different submarine.

Not only was it a different ship than the one he had prepared for, it was also the worst ship in its fleet. It was so bad, only three men had reenlisted.

Since David didn't know the ship, and since the situation was so bad, he had to try something different. Instead of using the leader/follower model, he started using a new leader/leader model. Instead of David giving orders, and instead of his men asking permission, he started empowering each sailor to think for himself.

You may have heard Jason Fried on episode 1 recommend David's book Turn the Ship Around. In it, David Marquet tells the story of how his leader/leader model turned the USS Santa Fe from worst to first. The year after David took command of the ship, 36 men reenlisted, instead of just 3. In the decade following, 10 of those men would go on to become submarine captains themselves.

David was in Medellín, and I sat down with him to talk about this and more:

How does the leader/leader model save mental energy for everyone involved? How can you encourage your micromanaging boss to use leader/leader? How did David go from being a submarine captain, to writing a book that USA Today calls one of the top 12 business books of all time. How did he learn to tell stories, and how did he actually get the writing done?

Join Love Your Work Elite

Each Love Your Work Elite member get their own personal RSS feed of bonus material, masterclasses, and early access to episodes. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments?

I love to hear anything and everything from you. Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

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Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/l-david-marquet-interview/

 



124. 88. Design Internship advice to a Millennial
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/d... download (audio/mpeg, 14.25Mb)

Description:

Love Your Work listener Gustav Dybeck is a design student from Sweden. He has an opportunity to do an internship for about 9 months, and he wants to make the most of it before he starts his career.

You may have heard a clip a couple of episodes back on Gustav's favorite moment on Love Your Work.

He was in Medellin awhile back, and since I originally pursued a career in design, Gustav was interested in hearing what I thought he should do for his internship. So, we talked about it in a cafe.

A quick warning, there's a lot of background noise in this. It's was an off-the-cuff idea to record our conversation, so this episode is a bit of an experiment.

We'll talk about:

Experiences abroad: do they really make you more innovative? Working for prestigious firms: is it really worth it? If you don't pursue a prestigious firm, what should you pursue? What one experience did I personally have early in my career that completely changed my perspective about what I wanted to accomplish in design?

Join Love Your Work Elite

Some levels of Love Your Work Elite now include a video (and audio) Masterclass with Poornima Vijayashanker. Poornima was engineer #1 at Mint, and shows you how make money off your idea from day one. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments?

I love to hear anything and everything from you. Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors

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Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/design-internship-advice/



125. 87. Cab driver, neuroscientist, PBS Frontline producer, conceptual artist, & Minutiae app co-founder, Daniel J. Wilson
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/d... download (audio/mpeg, 55.77Mb)

Description:

Daniel J. Wilson was working on a screenplay when I met him during a mini life in Buenos Aires several years ago. I'd soon learn that he was also an accomplished artist, with his work covered in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The London Times, and displayed all over the world, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Daniel has also worked in film, his IMDB page includes editing credits for a number of documentaries and TV series, co-producer credits for PBS's Frontline series, credits as an actor. He's also a competitive cycler, a former NYC Yellow Cab driver, and he's currently a PhD candidate in neuroscience.

If that weren't enough, Daniel's got a new app. It's called Minutiae. It's a bit of an "anti-social" network. When Instagram encourages you to scroll through lots of photos and make your life look amazing, this app is dedicated to capturing the mundane, everyday details of life.

I hear lots of people lament their varied interests. They're usually afraid to follow their curiosity because they're afraid of what they'll leave behind.

I've experienced this a lot myself. As I've made the switch to designing in advertising and architecture, to designing for startups, to founding my own startup, to writing books, and starting this podcast – you always have to wonder if you're killing your career when you switch paths.

Here's just a few things you're going to learn in this conversation:

Daniel's app Minutiae is delightfully impractical. It won't get acquired and it won't go public. How do you get the funding to build an app that's not a business? Why did Daniel go through all of the work to get his NYC Yellow Cab license? He actually ended up working as a cab driver! Daniel's always switching from one field to another, and planning adventures in his life. Hear how he thinks about learning how to know the unknown.

Join Love Your Work Elite

Some levels of Love Your Work Elite now include a Masterclass video recording with Noah Kagan. I interview Noah about the formula he used to add tens of thousands of leads to his email list. Sign up at lywelite.com.

 

 

Sponsors

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Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/daniel-j-wilson-interview/



126. 86. Choose your weapon to boost creative output
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/c... download (audio/mpeg, 9.79Mb)

Description:

It's easier than ever for creators to get their work noticed. But, it's harder than ever to actually get that work done.

Think about it this way: You're writing a novel. You use Twitter and Facebook and write on your blog, and your work gets noticed. But, you have to put all of those distractions aside, and get to writing. If you don't, your novel will never become real.

In this week's episode, I'll show you how to pick the right creative tool for the right creative thinking. Do your best work, without letting distractions knock you off-track.

This article originally appeared on Medium

Join Love Your Work Elite

Some levels of Love Your Work Elite now include a Masterclass video recording with Noah Kagan. I interview Noah about the formula he used to add tens of thousands of leads to his email list. Sign up at lywelite.com.

 

 

Sponsors
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Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/choose-your-weapon-podcast/

 



127. David Allen: Getting Things Done
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/d... download (audio/mpeg, 41.83Mb)

Description:

Almost 15 years ago, Getting Things Done started taking the internet by storm. Techies started buying binder clips and index cards in bulk. Today, "next actions" and "contexts" are commonplace in teams around the world. Just about everyone knows GTD stands for Getting Things Done.

When I was trying to deal with wearing multiple hats as a designer in an architecture firm, I absorbed some GTD through osmosis to get on top of my daily tasks.

A few years later, when I finally listened to the audiobook for GTD, I could feel my brain being rearchitected. I captured everything that was on my mind, and developed a habit of doing a "weekly review." Suddenly, my creative energy was unleashed. And so was my energy for thinking about the bigger picture, like what I wanted out of my life and my career.

Millions of people have been impacted by GTD in this way. It's all thanks to our guest today. After more than 20 years as a productivity consultant, David Allen (@gtdguy) finally put his knowledge into book form with Getting Things Done, which came out in 2001. Since then, he's taken GTD global, with certified GTD consultants all over the world. One of his top people even lives not too far from me down in Colombia.

Here's what we'll talk about in this conversation.

GTD helps clear the space in your head for creative work, but what about actually getting creative work done? We'll learn how David used GTD to actually write Getting Things Done. GTD also helps clear your mind for making big life decisions. How did David use GTD to decide to move from the US to Amsterdam a few years ago. GTD suggests a lot of paper for keeping track of things. What does David think about digital management of GTD?

Image credit: Vera de Kok

Join Love Your Work Elite

Some levels of Love Your Work Elite now include a Masterclass video recording with Noah Kagan. I interview Noah about the formula he used to add tens of thousands of leads to his email list. Sign up at lywelite.com.

 

 

Sponsors

http://pb.com/loveyourwork
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Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/david-allen-podcast-interview/

 



128. 84. Yes, you can multitask creative work.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/m... download (audio/mpeg, 5.80Mb)

Description:

You've heard that multitasking is a myth. I'm here to tell you that the idea that multitasking is a myth, is somewhat of a myth in itself.

When it comes to creative work, you can actually work on two projects at once. The trick is, you don't even know you're working on that second project.

This article originally appeared on Medium.

Join Love Your Work Elite

Some levels of Love Your Work Elite now include a Masterclass video recording with Noah Kagan. I interview Noah about the formula he used to add tens of thousands of leads to his email list. Sign up at kadavy.net/elite

 

 

Sponsors
http://pb.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/multitask-creative-work-podcast/

 

 



129. 83. 12,500 hours of deliberate rest. Alex Soojung-Kim Pang.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/a... download (audio/mpeg, 33.13Mb)

Description:

By now you've heard that you need 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to become a master of your craft. The story you don't hear is that it also takes 12,500 hours of deliberate rest.

When you rest, you let what you've learned sink in. The ties connecting concepts get stronger, and weak connections get cleared away.

Alex Soojung-Kim Pang is author of the book Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less. He's also a visiting scholar at Stanford University, and founder of The Restful Company, where he helps companies use deliberate rest to be more creative and productive.

I picked up Rest to help with research for my upcoming book. You should pick it up, too. It's fascinating. It's packed with research and stories about why rest is critical to creative productivity. I had to have Alex on the show to learn more, and have him break it down for us.

In this conversation, learn:

Why should you be deliberate about using rest to make your work better? What's the hypnogogic state, and how did the surrealist painter Salvador Dalí use it to get more creative ideas? Why did Ernest Hemingway always stop writing when he knew what was going to happen next. When's the best time to take a nap for optimal creative output? How long should the nap be?

Join Love Your Work Elite

Some levels of Love Your Work Elite now include a Masterclass video recording with Noah Kagan. I interview Noah about the formula he used to add tens of thousands of leads to his email list. Sign up at kadavy.net/elite

 

 

Sponsors
http://pb.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/alex-soojung-kim-pang/

 



130. 82. Stop thinking. Start doing. Three simple ways.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/s... download (audio/mpeg, 5.79Mb)

Description:

It's so easy to get caught up in ruminating over what we might do. I know I ruminated over starting this podcast for more than FOUR YEARS before I finally took action.

Fortunately, the guests here on Love Your Work are all doers, and they tend to encourage doing, instead of thinking. Having that constant reminder has helped me take action in growing this podcast, and in writing my new book.

But, sometimes doing, instead of merely thinking about doing, is easier said than done. That's what this article is about.

Join Love Your Work Elite

Love Your Work's audio hosting expenses are now fully listener-supported! Next up, let's make our publishing assistant costs listener-supported, too. Be an even bigger part of the show, and hear raw, ad-free interviews, weeks in advance. Sign up at kadavy.net/elite

 

 

Sponsors
http://pb.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/stop-thinking-start-doing/



131. 81. Go with your Hunch. Bernadette Jiwa.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/b... download (audio/mpeg, 33.16Mb)

Description:

Bernadette Jiwa (@bernadettejiwa) thinks there's been an obsession with data in entrepreneurship over the past several years. When we're not sure about something, we're encouraged to run tests.

I've even heard the advice before "test everything." Really? Test EVERYTHING? If you really know anything about statistics, you'll know that many things in a budding venture don't have a large enough sample size to be tested. If you're testing literally EVERYTHING, you'll get nothing done, and your company will have no vision.

Bernadette is author of the new book, Hunch: Turn Your Everyday Insights into the Next Big Thing. In it, she teaches you how to harness the power of your intuition, recognize opportunities other people miss, and create breakthrough ideas.

Seth Godin (who you heard on episode 77) calls Hunch "a modern classic." You can buy Hunch at kadavy.net/hunch.

In this conversation, I talk with Bernadette about:

Why did a hat salesman in New York do a better job at predicting the election results than data scientists like Nate Silver did? How did the shopping cart get invented? If the inventor had gone with the initial data, we might be stuck hauling baskets all over Whole Foods. Hunch is Bernadette's sixth book, so she has lots of publishing wisdom I was eager to soak up. She'll share her personal story about happily returning her advance check to a publisher. They wanted her to compromise her values. We'll also hear what Bernadette learned working closely with Seth Godin. She was the editor of Seth's giant book, "This Might Work."

Join Love Your Work Elite

Love Your Work's audio hosting expenses are now fully listener-supported! Next up, let's make our publishing assistant costs listener-supported, too. Be an even bigger part of the show, and hear raw, ad-free interviews, weeks in advance. Sign up at kadavy.net/elite

 

 

Sponsors
http://pb.com/loveyourwork
http://casper.com/loveit

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/bernadette-jiwa-interview/

 



132. 80. Why "Hustle?"
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/w... download (audio/mpeg, 5.36Mb)

Description:

There are a lot of voices out there in entrepreneurship encouraging you to "Hustle." I really don't like this word, and I think it sends the wrong message about just what you should be aspiring to in your life and work.

One thing you want to aspire to is to not pay too much for shipping costs in your business, and cut down on hassles.

Join Love Your Work Premium

Would you like to hear raw, ad-free interviews, weeks in advance? Just join Love Your Work Premium. For a small amount per month, you'll get access to ad-free interviews weeks in advance. Just go to kadavy.net/premium to sign up.

 

 

Sponsors
http://pb.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/why-hustle-podcast/

 

 



133. 79. Jeff Goins returns! Be a thriving artist (not a starving artist)
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/j... download (audio/mpeg, 35.87Mb)

Description:

You've heard it before. The story of the starving artist. You may even believe it yourself. You may think that to keep your creative integrity, you have to give up on making money.

Jeff Goins (@goinswriter) is returning to the podcast today to tell you about why that's not true at all. In fact, instead of being a starving artist, you can be a thriving artist.

Learn in this episode:

How is it that Michelangelo was actually a multimillionaire by today's standards? How did writers like John Grisham launch their careers while having a day job? How can you get leverage with publishers, record labels, and other gatekeepers, so they're chasing after you instead of the other way around? What can you do to put yourself in the "thriving artist" mindset?

Jeff's new book is called "Real Artists Don't Starve" and you can get it at kadavy.net/dontstarve.

 

 

Sponsors
http://freshbooks.com/loveyourwork

http://pb.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/jeff-goins-podcast-interview-2/

 



134. 78. Who wants to be a billionaire? (not me)
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/n... download (audio/mpeg, 5.88Mb)

Description:

The world around us can program certain goals into our minds. If we aren't careful, we can end up with goals that have nothing to do with our happiness.

You might not even realize that you expect to become a billionaire someday. You might be better off admitting to yourself that's not what you want.

Join Love Your Work Premium

Would you like to hear raw, ad-free interviews, weeks in advance? Just join Love Your Work Premium. For a small amount per month, you'll get access to ad-free interviews weeks in advance. Just go to kadavy.net/premium to sign up.

 

 

Sponsors
http://freshbooks.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/never-a-billionaire/



135. Seth Godin
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/s... download (audio/mpeg, 40.45Mb)

Description:

I first discovered the work of Seth Godin about 13 years ago. Since then he's helped me think about how to make work that's remarkable – The Purple Cow. He's shown me how to think about having a direct relationship with my customers – with Permission Marketing. He's shown me how to push through when things get tough – with The Dip.

Plus, countless other things. He's written so many books, Tribes, The Icarus Deception, All Marketers are Liars, just to name a few more. He writes a blog post every day. I still love going to Seth's blog because it looks like it came out of another time. It's on typepad. He doesn't even have a custom domain. Still, it's one of the few sites that I visit directly just to read what's there. While people are screaming about how you've gotta figure out a Snapchat strategy, Seth just sticks with good old-fashioned words, and he's so good at it.

Seth has been at the forefront of how technology changes how we communicate with one another. He started his first email newsletter in 1990. In fact, he invented the concept of getting emails from companies. Throughout his career, he's pointed out and described what this new paradigm makes possible. You have to Unleash the Ideavirus, you have to tell stories, you have to build your tribe.

But in more recent years, he's focused more on helping people overcome the emotional barriers of actually putting this advice into practice. This is what I was interested in figuring out coming into this interview. What caused that shift? How does Seth think about doing generous work? How do you gain the courage to do something that might not work?

I also wanted to dig back further into Seth's origin. I'm still struck by how far ahead of his time he was way back in the 80's and 90's, and how long it took for some of those concepts to gel and become true. It's a good lesson that if you want to do work that resonates with people, sometimes it takes a long time.

Here are the three links that Seth sent me about publishing:

Advice for authors Advice for authors Why (some) Kickstarter Campaigns Fail

Join Love Your Work Premium

Would you like to hear raw, ad-free interviews like this one with Seth Godin, weeks in advance? Just join Love Your Work Premium. For a small amount per month, you'll get access to ad-free interviews weeks in advance. You'll also get access to fully-produced episodes a couple of days in advance. Just go to kadavy.net/premium to sign up.

 

 

Sponsors
http://freshbooks.com/loveyourwork

http://www.casper.com/loveit

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/seth-godin-podcast-interview/



136. 76. Don't write a New York Times best-seller
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/n... download (audio/mpeg, 9.00Mb)

Description:

Some of you already know that I'm writing a new book. Getting Art Done will help you overcome Resistance and bring your work into the world.

I had much of my own Resistance to fight to get this book project underway. I spent three months working on a book proposal, then I failed to get a literary agent.

That was a tough blow, but what really flipped the switch for me was the conversation I had with Seth Godin. You'll be able to hear that entire conversation with Seth next week, so be sure you're subscribed.

Join Love Your Work Premium

If you'd like to hear the raw, unedited, ad-free interview with Seth Godin (coming June 8th), you can do that right now. Just join Love Your Work Premium. For a small amount per month, you'll get access to ad-free interviews weeks in advance. You'll also get access to fully-produced episodes a couple of days in advance. Just go to kadavy.net/premium to sign up.

 

 

Sponsors
http://freshbooks.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/no-nyt-best-seller-podcast/

 



137. 75. Chocolate. Danny Michlewicz, founder & chocolatier at Colombia's Tilín Cacao.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/d... download (audio/mpeg, 52.16Mb)

Description:

Not too long after moving to Colombia, Danny Michelwicz got obsessed with cacao, the raw material that's used to make chocolate.

Since then, he's been learning about the craft of sourcing cacao and making chocolate, learning about his new country in the process, and working to have an impact on an underserved region.

I went into this interview thinking I'd talk with Danny more about how his business, Tilín Cacao, has been a source of adventure, but we actually ended up talking a lot about the chemistry of chocolate, and how it's made.

There's a lot of interesting thoughts in here about finding a neglected opportunity, pursuing it with a sense of artistry, and making something unique and hard to replicate.

Try Danny's Chocolate

Danny has a shipment going to the United States later this summer. You can preorder for a huge discount. Just go to tilincacao.com/loveyourwork. I don't have any financial relationship with Danny's company, but I do love the chocolate.

Join Love Your Work Premium

If you'd like to hear the raw, unedited, ad-free interview with Seth Godin (coming June 8th), you can do that right now. Just join Love Your Work Premium. For a small amount per month, you'll get access to ad-free interviews weeks in advance. You'll also get access to fully-produced episodes a couple of days in advance. Just go to kadavy.net/premium to sign up.

 

 

Sponsors
http://kadavy.net/premium

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/danny-michlewicz-tilin/



138. 74. Don't join a podcast network for the wrong reasons
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/p... download (audio/mpeg, 15.13Mb)

Description:

Sometimes, to make a breakthrough, you have to partner up with "the man." Sometimes it's worth it. But, don't jump at every chance you get. I recently had an opportunity to join a podcast network. In fact, it was a very good podcast network.

But, I turned it down.

Since writing this article, I've watched this podcast network do very well. Meanwhile, I've struggled to grow this podcast. In fact, my downloads went DOWN for the first time since I started a year and a half ago.

Some of that is from Product Hunt shutting down their podcasts section, and it's hard to know what else has caused it.

As I'll say in this article, it's totally possible that I made the wrong decision. But, it still feels right to me.

This article originally appeared on kadavy.net.

 

 

Sponsors
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Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/podcast-network-podcast/



139. 73. Sean Stephenson. Choose growth.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/s... download (audio/mpeg, 34.10Mb)

Description:

May 5th, 1979. It was a jovial atmosphere. A new person was coming into the world. But as soon as the child was born, the room went quiet.

The doctors predicted the baby wouldn't make it through the next 24 hours. Now, over 35 years later, as that baby, now an adult, would joke in his TEDx talk – all of those doctors are dead. And Sean Stephenson @theseantourage is the only doctor that remains.

Sean Stephenson was born with brittle bone disorder. His growth was stunted, and he's suffered hundreds of bone fractures throughout his life.

But his condition has armed Sean with superpowers. He discovered that he has the power to rid the world of insecurity. In fact, it's become his life's mission – what he was born to do.

Sean Stephenson is a therapist, an author, and a motivational speaker. I first came across his work when a friend shared a video on Facebook. I was immediately struck by Sean's positivity, and I became an instant fan.

As someone who has struggled with insecurities – like everyone does, whether they accept it or not – Sean was immediately disarming to me. He's is uniquely qualified to help people break through the stories they tell themselves. Not just because of his life experiences, but also because of his training.

We'll get into how Sean discovered his superpower, and what he's learned about bringing growth into his life.

Sean's Facebook Page  Sean's ebook "How to Stay Positive When Life Gets Sean's free "Principles on How to Live an Empowered Life"

 

 

Sponsors
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Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/sean-stephenson-interview/



140. 72. Quit your daily routine. Start your weekly routine.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/w... download (audio/mpeg, 6.43Mb)

Description:

Routines can reduce cognitive friction and boost your productivity. But do you really want to do the same thing every day?

You know I think productivity is all about mind management, not time management.

Routines are useful for managing your mind. On this episode, I'll tell you how having a weekly routine can help you boost productivity and be more creative, without boring yourself to death.

This article originally appeared on Medium.

If you are listening to this before 5pm PST on Friday May 5th, 2017, pay close attention. Stop whatever you're doing, and go to gettingartdone.com.
 
I'm writing a new book. It's called Getting Art Done, and you can preview it for free if you act fast.
 
If you ever have trouble bringing your work into the world. This is the book for you. It will give you actionable steps to break down fear and self doubt, and make your art real.
 
Go to gettingartdone.com and sign up for email updates. That's gettingartdone.com. Do it now before the timer on the website runs out.

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/weekly-routine-podcast/

 



141. 71. End the attention economy. STEEM's Ned Scott on Steemit, cryptocurrency-driven social media, & the blockchain
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/s... download (audio/mpeg, 31.91Mb)

Description:

Ned Scott (@certainassets, Steemit: @ned is trying to reinvent the way content gets made. He wants you to get paid in the process. Ned is the co-founder of a cryptocurrency called STEEM, and he's CEO of a website that runs on STEEM, called Steemit.

Basically all of the actions that you would normally take on a site such as Reddit – writing posts, upvoting, or commenting, mines the STEEM – that's S-T-E-E-M – cryptocurrency. You can then cash in that cryptocurrency for the currency of your choice.

The attention economy and digital distraction
You've heard me talk about the economics of digital distraction on the podcast before. Hooked author Nir Eyal and I talked about it on episode 21. Companies such as Facebook steal your attention, because the current models of supporting content creation incentivize them to do so.

For example, because the bulk of Facebook's revenue is from ads, they want you to spend as much time on your news feed as possible. This then incentivizes content creators to create the most attention-grabbing content possible.

They'll use tactics such as inciting rage – even if it means ruining an innocent person's life. We saw this tactic backfire when Gawker outed a closeted gay executive. Or, they'll just plain lie – which is something we're seeing with the current "fake news" crisis.

The incentives of the attention economy
By the way, I discussed some of these incentives with Ryan Holiday on episode 31. Ryan wrote a great book on the subject with Trust Me, I'm Lying.

Will STEEM incentivize different behavior? Well, that remains to be seen. Many journalists are currently paid by the page view. I have journalist friends who have worked at a respectable newspaper, and their performance was measured by the page views on their stories.

Think about that for a second. They weren't allowed to own stocks because it would be considered a conflict of interest in case they had to write about one of those companies, but somehow being rewarded by the page view is not a conflict of interest?

So if journalists are no longer paid by the page view, but instead by their work being upvoted – the incentives will shift somehow. It's hard to say whether it would be good or bad, but they will shift.

Spending attention vs. spending STEEM
My theory is that we spend our attention far differently from how we spend our money. We're wired not to see the fruit in the bush, but rather the tiger behind the fruit in the bush.

With STEEM we aren't spending our money, per-se, but there appears to be a different psychology to upvoting on Steemit. I'm sure those incentives bring along other quirks. From what I've seen, the most popular content – hence the content that has earned the most money – on Steemit is about STEEM. Content like this podcast, I guess.

Other than that, like I say, it remains to be seen. To wrap your head around it, I'd recommend signing up at Steemit.com, and looking around. By the way, my Steemit username is kadavy, so let's connect there.

Can you earn money on Steemit?
I've been a STEEM user (@kadavy), or rather I've used the website Steemit (yes, it's a little confusing at first), for several months now. I've converted some of my STEEM to Bitcoin, just to run a test. So far, I've earned spendable money for using Steemit. And, as I record this, the total value of all of the STEEM that is out there is at over 50 million dollars.

Where does that money come from? How does STEEM work? Why might it work in the long run? and why might it not work? Ned and I will talk about all of that and more in this conversation.

Remember, none of this is investment advice, just an exploration of a potential new way to incentivize content creation.

Seth Godin interview coming soon!
A very revealing Seth Godin inteview is coming soon. Make sure you're subscribed, so you don't miss the episode.

 

 

Sponsors
http://freshbooks.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/steem-podcast-ned-scott/

 

 



142. 70. 7 lessons from my neighbor, Warren Buffett (lifestyle design, self-investment, habits, principles, & building Berkshire Hathaway)
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/w... download (audio/mpeg, 5.71Mb)

Description:

Warren Buffett (@WarrenBuffett) and I were neighbors. He lived in his famously modest house on Farnam. I lived in a $535-a-month 1-bedroom, in a basement with moldy carpet, several blocks down, on 49th.

I used to live down the street from the famous mega billionaire, Warren Buffett. I never even saw him, but his presence taught me a lot.

This article originally appeared on Medium.

Sponsors
http://freshbooks.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/warren-buffet-lessons-podcast/

 



143. 69. Be creatively persistent. Bachata dancers Ataca y La Alemana (Jorge Burgos & Tanja Kensinger) on using YouTube fame to build a business in latin dance.
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/a... download (audio/mpeg, 36.50Mb)

Description:

Jorge and Tanja wanted to travel the world, dance and party. It turns out, they were able to do that and make more money than they ever imagined they would.

Jorge and Tanja wanted to make it as a professional Salsa dancing couple. They aspired to travel the Salsa circuit, to perform in competitions, and they figured they could make ends meet teaching classes in their home city.

But the Salsa world was crowded. To make their debut as a dancing couple, they found they couldn't get a slot as Salsa performers.

So, they put together a performance dancing Bachata. Bachata is a Dominican style of music first recorded in the 1960's. (Medicina De Amor is played at this point in the intro.)

In recent years, Bachata has been remixed with current pop hits. Bachata is kind of Salsa's little cousin. (Latch Bachata Remix is played at this point in the intro.)

Bachata wasn't as popular as Salsa, so Jorge and Tanja were able to make an appearance.

The performance – danced to Xtreme's "Te Extraño" – ended up on YouTube. And it exploded.

Their debut performance has amassed nearly 100 million views, and it's launched Jorge and Tanja – and Bachata dancing – into super stardom.

Today, 9 years later, Jorge Burgos and Tanja Kensinger are known as Ataca y La Alemana (joint Instagram). They're Bachata royalty. They travel the world, run conferences, and their dance company, Island Touch, has dance teams all over the world.


Sponsors
http://freshbooks.com/loveyourwork

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/ataca-la-alemana-interview/

 



144. 68. 10 unconventional ways to achieve full focus (sleep, mindfulness, minimalism, & travel)
http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/1... download (audio/mpeg, 8.23Mb)

Description:

I take focus seriously. The way I see it, being productive is not about time management. It's about mind management. If you're fully-focused on the task at hand, you can have way more creative output.

So, I experiment a lot with ways to deepen my focus. Some of the methods I've settled into are unconventional. I'm going to share them with you today.

This article originally appeared on Medium.


Sponsors
http://freshbooks.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/10-unconventional-podcast/

 



145. 67. Ryan Hoover of ProductHunt: Start with community (community-building, culture, & mentors)
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 34.22Mb)

Description:

Ryan Hoover (@rrhoover) loves software products. He wanted to share new software products with other people who love software products.

So, he started a little email list. There were a few dozen people on the list. They were submitting products to the email list, so Ryan got to learn about new products every day.

But the email list grew rapidly. Once it got to a few hundred subscribers, Ryan decided it was a time to build a site.

Three years later, Ryan sold his site, ProductHunt, for about $20 million.

I don't spend much time in Silicon Valley these days, but I've at least heard that Ryan Hoover is kind of the golden child of the valley. He's perfectly executed building ProductHunt, and most importantly, building the community that drives ProductHunt.

And I think you'll notice in this conversation. I actually got kind of frustrated talking to Ryan. He seems to have always made the right decisions. I think some people are able to do that, but I'm not one of them.

I think it's actually hard to learn from people who do things right. That's why, on Love Your Work I'm always digging for the ways my guests have changed over the years, and where they went wrong along the way. Maybe I'm wrong, but I feel you can learn more from hearing about how someone changed than about how they executed everything right.

In any case, Ryan's story is a great example of how you can build something explosive by starting with something you're curious about, and building a genuine community around it.

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/ryan-hoover-interview/

 



146. 66. Read more books by hijacking your habits (Facebook, reading, & self-improvement)
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 5.22Mb)

Description:

Learn how to hijack habits you don't want, and replace them with habits you do want.

I'll specifically be talking about how to replace a Facebook habit with a book-reading habit. That's what I did, and that's what worked for me. But, you can try this with any habits you want to hijack.

This article originally appeared on Medium. You can follow me at kadavy.net/medium

Don't forget to take the Love Your Work survey for a chance to win a $20 Amazon Gift Card: http://kadavy.net/survey

 

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/hijack-habits-podcast/



147. 65. Getting writing done. Joanna Wiebe of Copy Hackers & Airstory (building an audience from an information business into a SAAS)
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 26.30Mb)

Description:

One day, Joanna Wiebe (@copyhackers) was hanging out on a web forum, helping a few startup founders with their copy. The next thing she knew, she had an inbox filled with requests for her help.

So many people needed her copy help, that she couldn't help them all, so Joanna released some ebooks, under the name Copy Hackers, and made about $30,000 right away.

Since then, Joanna has helped hundreds of entrepreneurs with their copy. But the more time she spent writing copy, the more she realized that all writers struggle with one thing: facing the blank page.

Joanna has built a new app, called Airstory, to help serious writers collect together all of the pieces that make good writing, and make it happen.

I immediately found it interesting, I've learned the hard way over the years that writing is not linear. Airstory helps bring the research and collaboration components of writing into a single cohesive experience.

Joanna and I will talk more about how to keep the creative process going smoothly. Plus, she'll share some great tips on doing customer research – I especially like her hack of combing through Amazon reviews.

Learn how, by following her passion, improvising with what she had, and facing her fears, Joanna has gone from her day job, to an information business, to building Airstory.

 

Take the listener survey (before April 7) for a chance to win a $20 Amazon Gift Card: http://kadavy.net/survey

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/joanna-wiebe-interview/

 

 



148. 64. Write first. Coffee later. (optimizing creative productivity by protecting focus in the early morning)
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 5.22Mb)

Description:

How do you feel first thing in the morning? If you're human, you're probably at least a little bit groggy. You aren't thinking straight, you can't focus. You're a wasted morning just waiting to happen.

So, the first thing you do is reach for the coffee.

I have a suggestion that may help you get more out of your mornings. Are you ready for this? I think you'll hate me for it.

Well, I think you should let the coffee wait.

I promise, I can explain. You see, that groggy feeling you have in the morning. You can do some amazing things in that state.

It's the subject of this week's episode. This article originally appeared on Medium. You can follow me on Medium at kadavy.net/medium.

Before I begin, how would you like a $20 Amazon Gift Card? Sound good? Well, I'm GIVING AWAY a $20 Amazon Gift Card every Friday from March 10th until April 7th. All you have to do is go to kadavy.net/survey and answer our short listener survey to be entered to win.

It's seriously short. It will take you less than two minutes. I promise.

Remember, I'm giving away a gift card EVERY WEEK, so, the sooner you answer the survey, the more chances you get to win. You only have to answer the survey once, and you'll get up to 5 chances to win.

This episode comes out March 9th, so if you go to kadavy.net/survey and answer the survey RIGHT NOW, you'll have a very high chance of winning a $20 Amazon gift card, because I'm giving away a gift card TOMORROW.

Again, go to kadavy.net/survey for a chance to win a $20 Amazon Gift card.

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/write-first-coffee-later/

 



149. 63. Peter Bragiel – Make your dreams reality (building a travel show on YouTube)
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 48.31Mb)

Description:

Peter Bragiel wanted his own travel show. So, he got a camera and started traveling.

At first, not much happened. Peter Bragiel just kept stowing the tapes away in a box.

But, eventually, his adventures got bigger, and his videos got better. He's travelled the entire trans-Siberian railway, he's canoed the entire Mississippi river, and he even rode a tiny scooter, with a maximum speed of 29 miles-per-hour, across the United States. Peter's adventures are released on his YouTube channel, under the brand In-Transit TV.

And Peter makes a living off of these travel videos. He's worked with brands such as Range Rover and American Express. He also learned Spanish using Rosetta Stone, as preparation for a sponsored trip to Cuba. (He ended up crashing a vintage car during the shoot. You'll hear about that, and what they did about it.)

This week's episode is a great story about making dreams happen. How did Peter finally get the courage to publish his videos? How does he plan bigger and bigger trips? Why did Peter – who worked as a runway model in Milan, and an actor in Los Angeles – reject the gatekeepers and choose himself?

I can't help but feel, after listening to this conversation, that Peter and I are a lot alike. It seems like he has always felt compelled to travel and make videos, even if it didn't immediately make sense. I know I'm always spending hours on things that don't immediately make sense.

I especially liked hearing about how things he wrote in his journal years ago, eventually came to light. I think this is important to be aware of. Your subconscious is always trying to tell you something about your destiny, so it pays to listen.

Sponsors
http://kadavy.net/freshbooks
http://kadavy.net/treehouse

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/peter-bragiel-interview/

 



150. 62. My top rejections
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 8.24Mb)

Description:

Rejection hurts. Sometimes it hurts a little more than other times, but it still does hurt.

But, rejection is a part of life. If you never get rejected, you’re not really trying.
In 2016, I quadrupled my creative output. But, I got rejected harder and more frequently than any year before. I’m hoping for bigger and better rejections in 2017.

I reviewed my 2016 rejections, and it didn’t feel good. I had to relive them all at once. But, it was a valuable exercise, and — if nothing else—you can take some sadistic pleasure in reading about them.

 

Sponsors
http://kadavy.net/freshbooks
http://kadavy.net/treehouse

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/top-rejections-podcast/

 

 



151. 61. Ignore Everybody. Hugh MacLeod of Gapingvoid (originality, & the courage to be different)
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 37.16Mb)

Description:

Hugh MacLeod (@hughcards) is a hero of mine, who helped me find my own path.

It was 2004, I was sitting in a gray cubicle in Nebraska. And I discovered a PDF on the Internet called "How to be creative." I read it, and it was one of the most moving and inspiring things I had ever read.

You know how sometimes you read something and you're like "yes! That's exactly what I was thinking! Except I didn't have words for it." This little PDF was like that for me. It was subversive, and edgy, and bold, and spoke to the non-conformist part of me that wanted to live outside of the template.

And it had these brilliant little cartoons in it. They were all the same format. And small. Very small.

It turns out they were all drawn on the back of business cards. Hugh MacLeod, the man behind this PDF had been drawing these cartoons for 7 years by this point.

I came across his blog, called Gaping Void, and found more bold thinking and brilliant cartoons there. It was one of the blogs that inspired me to start my blog in 2004. I even put it in my "blog roll."

You see, there was no Twitter or Facebook, so that's how you would connect people and ideas. You'd just put a link to their blog on your blog. And that's how you would say "listen to this person. This person has things to say."

Since then, Hugh's cartoons have been seen everywhere. He's built a consulting business around the cartoons, helping companies define and express their culture. Companies like Microsoft, Cisco, Volkswagon, Zappos, eBay, and Intel. Hugh even illustrated a book with Seth Godin.

Well, I'm very excited to be connecting you with Hugh MacLeod's ideas today. Listen to this interview to discover how to overcome perfection paralysis in your work. How do you discover your creative DNA? How do you fill your work with the universal truths of human experience, to make it resonate with others. And ultimately, how, and why, do work that serves others.

 

Sponsors
http://kadavy.net/freshbooks
http://kadavy.net/blogtutorial
http://kadavy.net/treehouse

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/hugh-macleod-interview/

 

 



152. 60. Focus with practical minimialism
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 6.66Mb)

Description:

I talked about minimalism with some of my guests. I talked about it with Craig Benzine on episode 39, and with James Altucher on episode 53.

I'm not an extreme minimalist. I don't count the number of things that I own, trying to keep the number down. I consider myself to be a practical minimalist. I have just enough things to improve my focus, but I don't have so many things that it hurts my focus.

I recently went minimalist when I sold most of my things and moved to Colombia. In this episode, I'll share just how being a practical minimalist helps me focus.

This post originally appeared on Medium. You can find it and follow me at kadavy.net/medium

 

Sponsors
http://kadavy.net/freshbooks
http://kadavy.net/treehouse

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/practical-minimalism-focus-pod/

 

 



153. 59. The net appears. Vinnie Lauria of Golden Gate Ventures, Singapore (leaving a secure job, traveling Asia, overcoming emotional barriers, power networking)
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 34.70Mb)

Description:

Vinnie Lauria found his calling after backpacking around Asia.

He had just sold a company. He had just gotten married. He feared that if he spent a year traveling, he'd run out of money, and he'd run out of momentum. He worried it would be career suicide.

But his wife, Kristine, pushed him to seize the day. They sold everything, gave up their apartment in The Mission and hopped on a one way flight across the Pacific, planning to come back in a year.

Throughout his travels, Vinnie kept doing what he does best. He was meeting entrepreneurs everywhere he went – Korea, Japan, China, Indonesia, India, you name it – all over Asia.

Along the way, he stumbled across a unique opportunity. He noticed there was a gap in funding for entrepreneurs in Southeast Asia. All of the Venture Capital firms were risk averse, and didn't invest with a Silicon Valley mindset. Meanwhile, there was an explosion of early-stage startups hungry for funding.

So, with no investment experience to speak of, Vinnie partnered up with some friends and started a Venture Capital firm. Golden Gate Ventures is an early-stage VC firm in Southeast Asia. They've invested $60 in over 30 companies in 7 countries, including TradeGecko and Redmart.

He and Kristine now live in Singapore, with their two children. They never did move back to San Francisco.

Vinnie is a really close friend of mine. A year after I moved to California, I was pretty lost. I didn't like living in San Jose, and I didn't like the direction my startup was going in. I couldn't bear to give up and move back to Nebraska. Meanwhile San Francisco was just up the road, if only I had the courage to make the move.

Around that time, I met Vinnie, and spent a lot of time with him and his now wife, Kristine. They were both adventurous, and had a bold perspective on living life. I did move up to San Francisco, and fulfilled a life-long dream of living in a bustling city.

Vinnie always offered inspiration when I needed it. You'll see he's not afraid to do things that many people consider risky. He values adventure, and he's a big advocate of putting yourself in a situation where you have no choice but to succeed. As Vinnie likes to say "when you jump, the net appears."

Listen to this episode for inspiration on making big changes in your life. Vinnie will share his story of quitting a secure job at IBM and moving across the country with no plan. We'll talk about how he used to live and work with as many as 12 people in a 3-bedroom apartment. He'll share his unique methods for managing the roughly 1,000 new people he meets every year, and how best to connect them. Overall, you'll hear how a guy from Long Island ended up founding a VC firm in Singapore.

 

Sponsors
http://kadavy.net/freshbooks
http://kadavy.net/ac
http://kadavy.net/treehouse

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/vinnie-lauria-interview/

 

 



154. 58. How I quadrupled my creative productivity (writing, healthy habits & routines, & facing fears)
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 7.92Mb)

Description:
We're well into 2017 now, and I've been reflecting on 2016. It was a great year. In fact, I more than quadrupled my creative output.
 
I'm just talking about words published here. I'm not even talking about the weekly episodes I published here on Love Your Work. Almost every episode of Love Your Work so far has been in 2016.
 
I spent much of 2016 experimenting with some methods of optimizing my creative output, and I'll be sharing them today.
 
This post originally appeared on Medium. You can find it and follow me at kadavy.net/medium
 
 
 


155. 57. How Noah Kagan manages his mental energy (productivity, sleep, time management, & creativity)
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Description:

Noah Kagan first appeared on Love Your Work back on episode 41. On that episode, we talked about why discomfort is your compass, and learned that Noah even makes his bed in hotel rooms.

I asked Noah to come back on the show because he had a blog post awhile back that I wanted to ask him about. It's called "my organization system," over on his blog, Okdork.com, and he talks pretty in-depth about how he manages his calendar week-to-week.

I've been thinking a lot about managing mental energy throughout the week – after all, productivity – especially creative productivity – is more about mind management than it is about time management.

So, listen to this show to hear, in-depth, how Noah optimizes his creative output by managing his mental energy. How does he get into flow? How does he juggle all of the details of running AppSumo and SumoMe? And how does he recharge?

Noah is also joining the world of podcasters with his new show, Noah Kagan Presents. Noah interviewed me, and that episode should come out in a few weeks. Go subscribe to Noah Kagan Presents to be sure not to miss it.

 

Sponsors
http://kadavy.net/freshbooks
http://kadavy.net/ac
http://kadavy.net/treehouse

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/noah-kagan-interview-2/

 



156. 56. See you next year. Here's why. (New Year's resolutions, & the importance of sleep & rest)
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Description:

Over the past year, pretty much every week, I've released a new episode of Love Your Work. This will be my last episode this year. I'll be taking a break for a few weeks.

We've come so far since exactly one year ago, when the first batch of episodes debuted. The show has now been downloaded over 200,000 times! If you follow me on Twitter or Facebook, you may have seen some of the growth charts. The downloads just keep growing week after week.

I'm thrilled that the show is resonating with people, and I appreciate the subscribes and the reviews. I've had a great time over the past year, and I've learned so much from our guests.

The show is really taking off, so why am I taking a break? I thought I'd share my thought process. I think it will make a good mini-episode in itself.

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/see-you-next-year/

 



157. 55. Make your bed, change THE WORLD!? (ft. James Altucher, Dan Ariely, Jason Fried, Ryan Holiday, Tucker Max, Noah Kagan & more)
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Description:

There's this sort of productivity meme going around that you should make your bed.

But, isn't making your bed kind of a waste?

And isn't making your bed especially wasteful if you're busy?

Here on Love Your Work, I've spent the past year interviewing some of the most successful entrepreneurs and creators. People like James Altucher, Jason Fried, Ryan Holiday, Laura Roeder, billionaire Steve Case, and many more.

I wanted to get to the bottom of this meme. Today, on a very special episode of Love Your Work, we ask: do you really need to make your bed to be successful?

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/make-your-bed/

 



158. 54. 8 Things I Wish I Had Known About Building Online Courses (having an impact, & self-motivation through product development)
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Description:

One of the best ways to impact others, while making money, is through building online courses. And, if you're considering writing a book, developing an online course is a great way to validate your idea, and see if your advice works.

But, building online courses can be totally overwhelming. It seems there's so much you need to know about developing it, and marketing it. Then, there's all of the technical nuts and bolts for collecting payment, and delivering the course.

Like many things, your vision of what your online course could be can get in the way of you even starting.

I learned the hard way just how much energy you can waste with things that don't add value to your course. And, what I learned can be applied to product development at large.

 

Sponsors
http://wpengine.com/pre
http://kadavy.net/freshbooks
http://kadavy.net/video

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/8-things-online-courses/

 

 



159. James Altucher
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Description:
James Altucher doesn't need an introduction for many of you. But for the rest, James is currently best known for his book, Choose Yourself, which is a National Bestseller, and which USA Today named in the top 12 business books of all time. You can buy Choose Yourself at kadavy.net/choose
 
He also has a very popular podcast. The James Altucher show has featured guests such as Tim Ferriss, Dan Ariely, Peter Thiel, Coolio, and Jewel.
 
James has published well over a dozen books, and first made his name as a financial pundit, writing for The Financial Times, and TheStreet.com. He's also appeared many times on CNBC as a financial expert.
 
James has become a millionaire, then lost it all, multiple times. He's been an entrepreneur, a hedge fund manager, and even hosted an HBO show. He writes about what he's learned through the ups and downs of his life and career on his website, jamesaltucher.com. Popular articles include "How to be the luckiest guy on the planet in 4 easy steps," and "I want my kids to be drug addicts."
 
Listen to this conversation to learn the hows and whys of investing in yourself, including why buying a house may be a terrible decision for you.
 
James and I will also talk about our recent experiences with going minimalist. He has a method for getting rid of things that I wish I would have used.
 
I really wanted to dig into how James has managed to be so prolific in his work. He produces a ton of work, It seems like he rarely doubts any ideas he has.
 
It seems like it's always been that way for him. Which doesn't help much if you're struggling to be more courageous in your work. If you're someone, like me, who wasn't born thinking big, James will share his tips on how to make progress.
 
As someone who has learned a lot from reading James's writing, I was also excited to learn more about how he approaches writing. James is going to share some absolute gold on writing that has already helped me make my own writing connect with others.
 
Also, learn how my former neighbor, Warren Buffett chose himself. And, if you happen to be a podcaster too, I selfishly asked James how he connects with influential guests, and how he prepares for interviews. Even if you aren't a podcaster, his answers, of course, could help you connect with influencers, and help you get more out of the books you read.
 
 
 
 


160. 52. My $40,000 DIY MBA (investing in your self-education)
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Description:
One of the more subtle underlying themes of this show is that you should invest in yourself. There's a lot of noise out there you'll hear from others who want you to spend your money in ways that will benefit them. Ultimately, you have to be mindful in your decisions so that you're sure you're really investing in yourself.
 
I'll be talking about that a bit more in my conversation next week with James Altucher.
 
Look out for that episode to drop next TUESDAY. I'm going to release it slightly early so it doesn't interfere with Thanksgiving in the US.
 
For now, I want to share my own story of choosing myself. This is about the time that I almost went to business school. What I decided to do next defined the course of my career.
 
 
Sponsors
http://wpengine.com/pre
http://kadavy.net/freshbooks
http://kadavy.net/video
 
 
 


161. Dan Ariely
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Description:
Dan Ariely is a researcher on the forefront of behavioral science. He specializes in understanding irrational behavior, for example, why do people take less candy if you give it out for free, than if you charge a penny for all the candy you want?
 
Dan actively works to find ways to change behavior for the better using this knowledge. Dan is a professor of Psychology and Behavioral Economics at Duke University. He's also the founder of the Center for Advanced Hindsight, which helps companies improve well-being using behavioral science. Dan has also co-founded many companies, including a productivity app called Timeful. I worked with Dan on Timeful, and Google bought the company. Now, some of Timeful's features, such as "Goals" have been integrated into Google Calendar, impacting what must be hundreds of millions of people. Dan's numerous TED talks have been viewed nearly 15 million times. He's the author of three New York Times best-selling books, including Predictably Irrational. He has a new book called "Payoff: The Hidden Logic That Shapes Our Motivations," which you can buy at kadavy.net/payoff.
 
In Dan's new book, he unlocks the secrets of motivation, whether you're motivating others, or yourself. Listen to this interview to learn why bonuses can reduce productivity, what is it that people really want from work? How does Dan – who is a self-proclaimed bad manager – manage a big lab of talented people? And how can you hack your own motivation using behavioral science research?
 
 
Sponsors
http://wpengine.com/pre
http://kadavy.net/freshbooks
http://kadavy.net/video
 
 
 


162. 50. Productivity isn't about Getting Things Done anymore (mindfulness for creative breakthroughs)
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Description:

The current productivity wisdom is all about getting things done. Now, productivity is about making creative breakthroughs happen.

Getting Things Done brought us beyond todo lists and priorities, and made us think about breaking projects into actions, and giving those actions contexts.
By considering the context of our todos, and by giving ourselves a place for the “someday maybes,” we freed up our minds from the overwhelming wave of clutter delivered by our newly-digital world.

GTD was the killer tool of the knowledge worker. But, in an increasingly distracted world, where even knowledge work is threatened by technology, productivity needs to evolve once again.

This article originally appeared on Medium. You can follow me on Medium at kadavy.net/medium

 

Sponsors
http://wpengine.com/lyw
http://kadavy.net/freshbooks
http://kadavy.net/video

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/productivity-isnt-gtd/

 

 

 



163. 49. Medium.com Writing, Book Positioning & Marketing Psychology – Nir Eyal & David Kadavy
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Description:

Nir Eyal, author of Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products, has been on the show before. We had a little debate about digital distraction back in episode 21.

Nir and I have both been exploring new book ideas independently, and practicing writing about those ideas, somewhere within that space. I've been leaning more into the productivity space, which you've heard a lot of on this podcast.

So, we recently had a call where we discussed where we were headed, how we're testing out new ideas, and how we might position new ideas. We figured, just in case, we'd record the conversation, in case it would make a good podcast episode.

And I think it will make a good episode, especially if you're an aspiring author who wonders how to home in on the right book idea. We'll talk about writing for Medium.com, and why it's such a powerful tool for testing out new ideas. I'll get very specific about my process for analyzing ideas I write on Medium, and how I decide what's worth pursuing further. We'll also talk about the psychology of book positioning, book marketing, and coming up with titles for books – a bit of an extension of the book marketing conversation I had with Tucker Max on episode 29.

Note that I say "we," and I'm aware I ended up dominating the conversation. This is something I do when I get too excited about something. Still, it should be useful. And if you have no book-writing aspirations, it will be a perhaps unsettling behind-the-scenes look at how the sausage is made.

 

Sponsors
http://wpengine.com/lyw
http://kadavy.net/freshbooks
http://kadavy.net/video

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/medium-book-marketing-nir-eyal/

 



164. 48. Make it easy to do what's good for you (digital detox & building healthy habits through design)
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Description:

If you have certain behaviors that you want to encourage in your life, you can be intentional about making them happen. Here's a trick I devised to make it easy to do things that are good for me, and a little harder to do things that are bad for me.

This article originally appeared on Medium. You can follow me on Medium at kadavy.net/medium

 

Sponsors
http://wpengine.com/lyw
http://kadavy.net/freshbooks
http://kadavy.net/video

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/make-it-easy-podcast/

 

 



165. 47. Getting the most out of email: Jocelyn K. Glei (productivity & business networking through email)
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 56.94Mb)

Description:

Jocelyn K. Glei is author of Unsubscribe: How to Kill Email Anxiety, Avoid Distractions, and Get Real Work Done. You can buy the book at kadavy.net/email It's an awesome book that I really wish I had when I was first trying to get things done with email in the working world. I've since gotten my email decently organized, just through learning the hard way. Still, Unsubscribe had some very useful ideas and tools for me, I'll be exploring it all in my conversation with Jocelyn today.

Listen to this episode to learn how you can keep email from distracting you from your important work, how can you use it to move projects forward, to build relationships with influential people, and how can you use it in a way that will nurture the relationships that you do have?

 

Sponsors
http://wpengine.com/lyw
http://kadavy.net/treehouse
http://kadavy.net/audible

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/jocelyn-k-glei-interview/

 



166. 46. #YOLO, so point your face at a blank wall (building discipline for creative habits)
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Description:

Back when I was writing my first book, I was shocked how hard it was. I was spending all day just trying to get into that flow state.

So, here's one way I've found to help make that flow state happen on demand.

 

Sponsors
http://wpengine.com/speedy
http://kadavy.net/treehouse
http://kadavy.net/audible

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/yolo-blank-wall/

 

 



167. Max Temkin
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Description:

Cards Against Humanity's Max Temkin (@maxtemkin) is co-creator of Amazon's #1 selling card game – actually the #1 seller in all of the whole Toys & Games category. It's a game for horrible people, and it's also America's #1 gerbil coffin. You've probably played it before.

Max Temkin and his friends were self-described "nerds." They didn't play sports, they didn't have girlfriends, and they were bored. So, they played lots of board games. They played Balderdash so much, they couldn't even play it anymore because they knew all of the words in the game.

They became game connoisseurs. They played so many games, they had to make their own. Cards Against Humanity started as PDFs you could download and print out. The game is still available this way, for free, on their website, but Cards Against Humanity has independently produced and sold their game, making millions in profit.

Listen to this interview to learn how to make a good impression on notable people, how to be ready to act when luck comes your way, what deep two psychological phenomena made Cards Against Humanity so explosively popular, and why it's important to figure things out for yourself. Also, learn how Max and team made $70,000 by literally selling "nothing," and nearly $4 million selling bullshit. I mean actual shit from bulls.

 

Sponsors
http://wpengine.com/speedy
http://kadavy.net/treehouse
http://kadavy.net/audible

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/max-temkin-interview/

 



168. 44. I Failed. (overcoming rejection & ego in book publishing)
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Description:

This week, I share you a story of failure. I know everyone seems to be obsessed with failure lately, and I always thought it was strange. I didn't usually look at things as failures, but as lessons learned.

Well, in this case, I really tried for something, really thought I would succeed, and I really failed. Or at least I felt like it. In actuality, it could just be another lesson learned – another step on the path toward meeting my goal.

This is an article that originally appeared on Medium. You can follow me on Medium at kadavy.net/medium

 

Sponsors
http://wpengine.com/speedy
http://kadavy.net/treehouse
http://kadavy.net/audible

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-work-episode-44-failed/

 

 



169. Mark Manson
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Description:

Mark Manson is known for writing personal development advice that doesn't suck. He writes at markmanson.net, which has more than 2 million readers a month. Mark writes about a variety of topics, including happiness, self-knowledge, habits, and relationships.

You've probably read Mark's work before. Big hits include "Fuck Yes or No," "In Defense of Being Average," and an article by the same name as his upcoming book: "The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck."

I love Mark's writing because it cuts right through the usual self-help nonsense you read that may make you think that all you need to do is follow your passion and think positively and you'll somehow magically become successful.

Instead, Mark encourages you to see things as they are, to find comfort in discomfort, and to accept that when you try to have it all, you really end up with very little.

So, this interview is great for anyone ready to face the hard truths in life in pursuit of being the best version of themselves.

Find out why mark starts off his new book telling you "don't try." How can you find fulfillment and shut down unhealthy cycles in your life and relationships. How can travel clean away your biases and insecurities. If you're living or considering living the digital nomad lifestyle for awhile, how does Colombia differ from Brazil? How can you get the benefits of travel without leaving your hometown? And how does your lifestyle change when your values change?

 

Sponsors
http://wpengine.com/speedy
http://kadavy.net/treehouse
http://kadavy.net/audible

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/mark-manson-interview/

 



170. 42. Yes, You Can Leave the North America Bubble (personal enrichment through the spread of the digital nomad lifestyle)
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 8.46Mb)

Description:

On Tim Ferriss's podcast, Malcolm Gladwell urged his 30-year-old self to “Leave North America…. Which is — despite the fact that it pretends to be the only place that matters — is not the only place that matters.”

I recently moved out of North America myself, and I share my thought process in this Medium article (which also appeared on Observer).

 

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171. Noah Kagan
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 77.16Mb)

Description:

Noah Kagan is a close friend of mine who has been one of my secret weapons in my own battle as an entrepreneur. Years ago, when I first started out on my own, and I was wandering from cafe to cafe in San Francisco, working on a Facebook app, Noah Kagan invited me to bring my laptop to his office space. He was building his own Facebook app empire at the time.

We'd get burritos in South Park, in SOMA, and Noah always had fresh ideas. Ever since then, whenever I've struggled with motivation, whenever I've felt overwhelmed in my business, I've asked myself What Would Noah Kagan Do?

Noah is now best known for AppSumo, which is a daily deals site for digital goods, and also SumoMe, which is a little toolkit you can install on your website to grow your audience with email sign-ups, a share widget, click heatmaps and a bunch more tools.

You may have also heard of Noah because he's missed out on some big exits. He was #4 at Mint, which sold to Intuit for $170 million, and he was #30 at Facebook, which is currently valued at more than $350 billion, but he got fired after 8 months.

So, Noah potentially missed out on easily more than a hundred million dollars. Most people hear that, and it sounds totally devastating. But, I know Noah, and I don't think he would change a thing.

That's because Noah has injected his own personality and his own unique way of doing things into his business. And he's found success his own way. He's done that better than anyone I know. He works really hard, but he always makes it fun. In fact, I sat down during a retreat he organized with his company in Chicago. The retreat even had a t-shirt, and Noah was of course wearing it.

I can recall many different 2-minute conversations I've had with Noah that have lead to big breakthroughs, and – wow – we have more than an hour here.

Listen to this episode and learn about continuous improvement:

How does Noah keep improving in his business – specifically when it comes to running webinars? How do you incentivize others to be selfish and get them to share? How do you balance the art of a business with the operations? How do you find complementary team members? How do you pick your battles to have the biggest impact with the least headaches? Why is discomfort your compass? Why might you want to read the same book over and over again? and more...
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172. 40. 3 Productivity Lessons from Google Calendar (cognitive biases, habit-building, & daily routines)
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Description:
Google Calendar has been adding new features lately. You can find time for your goals, and set reminders, for example. I played a very small part in these features, but I learned a lot about my own productivity in the process.
 
This post originally appeared on Medium.
 
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173. 39. Embrace Constraints: WheezyWaiter (Craig Benzine) on Minimalism & Creative Habit-Building
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Description:

Craig Benzine hit rock bottom when he wasn't getting any tables at his job as a waiter, and he feared he wouldn't be able to pay his rent. So, he started making YouTube videos.

Okay, that's not the first thing I'd advise you to do if you're having trouble paying rent, but it worked for Craig. He's built a life and living for himself making videos featuring clones of himself, imaginary whales, explosions, beards, and coffee.

Craig is known on YouTube and elsewhere as WheezyWaiter. And he also runs a channel called The Good Stuff where he teaches you all about things like renewable energy, robots, and albino squirrels.

He also appears on a channel called Crash Course, where he's the U.S. Government and Politics instructor.

If all of that weren't enough, Craig is also in a band called Driftless Pony Club, and they have released 6 albums since 2004.

I dabbled with making silly YouTube videos myself several years ago, and that's when I first discovered Craig's work. I couldn't figure out how on earth Craig was managing to make a video every single day before going to work. It was inspiring to watch, and at the same time it made me feel totally inadequate.

Fortunately, I got to sit down with him in Chicago, and ask him how he does it. You'll learn about how Craig uses habit-building and constraints to increase his creative output. How does he manage to put out so much great work.

You'll notice also how Craig works with his productivity cycles. He knows the best time of day for his creative work, and he makes the most of it.

 
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174. 38. Build the Habit First
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Description:

We all have habits that we'd like to build. But we usually aim a little too high. If you understand that the building of the habit is in itself something to achieve, then building good habits will be easier. This article originally appeared on Medium.

 

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175. 37. Harness the Power of Your Productivity Cycles – David Kadavy
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Description:

David Kadavy (that's me) being interviewed by Almog from the Unstagnate podcast. He did such a great job of researching, and teasing out the things I've been thinking about a lot lately that I just had to share it with you, which he was kind enough to let me do.

In this discussion, I'll share the rituals and thought frameworks I used to write my first book, Design for Hackers, in half the time of most books like it. Bear in mind that's total time from book deal to book release. It actually was 12 hours a day of agony, but I'll tell you about the cohesive personal productivity system I've devised to make my flow states happen at the right times.

You'll also hear the story behind how that first book even happened – how I had set up my entire life so that when something like that opportunity came along – I would be ready for it.

Also, how did I get the opportunity to work with behavioral scientist Dan Ariely, on features that are now being integrated into Google Calendar, such as "Goals" and "Reminders."

Find out why you might want to grab a pen BEFORE you grab your morning coffee. How to create a virtuous cycle of productivity to train yourself to focus more deeply. Why is it so important to develop a well-defined worldview? How do I weigh the pros and cons of various ways of naming things, such as my book Design for Hackers, and this podcast, Love Your Work? How does the name of this podcast tie into landing big guests like Steve Case and Jason Fried, and how do I convince such busy people to be so generous with their time?

 

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176. 36. Follow the "First-Hour" Rule
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Description:

Do you have a big daunting project that you just can't seem to get started on? Try the "First-Hour" rule. This article originally appeared on Medium.

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177. 35. Using Paleo & Ketogenic Diet Principles to Fight Inflammation – Dr. Terry Wahls on ketosis, anti-inflammatory foods, & the microbiome
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Description:
Dr. Terry Wahls (@terrywahls) is an inspiring example of turning a struggle into an opportunity, but I was more interested in her area of expertise.
 
You may have already seen the inspiring TEDx talk of Dr. Terry Wahl's. She has MS, and was confined to a wheelchair for 4 years. But, using her knowledge of biology, Dr. Terry engineered a diet based upon paleo and ketogenic principles to feed the power centers of her cells. Now, she rides her bike to work, and is out of the wheelchair.
 
Dr. Terry is now running clinical trials based upon her diet protocol, and has written a book. I recently picked up, The Wahl's Protocol to seek relief from chronic inflammation, and I've implemented her diet with great results. I have less pain, more energy, and I've also noticed my mental performance improve. You can pick up the book at http://kadavy.net/wahls
 
In this interview, we cover some of the building blocks of Dr. Terry's diet: What really does "paleo" mean? How does this "ketosis" thing you've heard about so much lately really work, and what does it mean for your health – especially for epilepsy and cancer? What does someone really mean when they say a diet is "detoxifying," and how does detoxification work?
 
What are the challenges in proving and implementing dietary treatments, and how do you evaluate the potential upsides or downsides of experimental approaches in general. We'll even talk about stem cell transplants, fecal transplants, and the microbiome.
 
If you or anyone close to you is battling an illness, you may find something useful in this interview, and even if you are healthy, you'll hear interesting and exciting things on the frontiers of health.
 
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178. 34. Productivity Hack: Do Nothing
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Description:

This is an article that originally appeared on Medium. It was later picked up by The Atlantic's Quartz.

Give yourself permission to do nothing once in awhile. You may be surprised how productive it makes you.

Sponsors
http://wpengine.com/loveyourwork
http://activecampaign.com/loveyourwork
http://kadavy.net/audible

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-34-productivity-hack-do-nothing/

 

 



179. 33. Double Down on Love – SimplyRecipes' Elise Bauer on creative habits, mindset management, & cooking
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Description:

Elise Bauer's SimplyRecipes (@simplyrecipes) is where I go when I'm searching for a recipe. I always find something healthy and delicious, with clear instructions and beautiful photos, all posted by Elise herself.

Honestly, I probably don't have to type in the "simplyrecipes" part because the site is extremely popular. It's been featured in Time Magazine and was named the #1 food blog by the Daily Meal 4 years in a row.

Whatever I'm looking for, I find it, because Elise has posted about 1,600 recipes over the past 15 years. She started SimplyRecipes when she was so sick, she had to move back in with her parents at the age of 40. At first, she was hand-coding her recipes in static HTML and just posting them to her personal site, Elise.com.

Now the site has grown so massive, she recently sold it to Fexy Media, but still handles all of the cooking and writing and posting of recipes.

I wanted to bring Elise's story to you not only because I love SimplyRecipes, but also because she has such a great story. As you'll hear in the interview, during a difficult time, she took the little things that were good in her life and expanded on them. She doubled down on love and built something great.

Sponsors
http://wpengine.com/loveyourwork
http://activecampaign.com/loveyourwork
http://kadavy.net/audible

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/elise-bauer-interview/

 

 



180. 32. Stop A/B Testing
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Description:
A/B testing is a really hot topic in entrepreneurship. Fortunately, I think people have started to come to their senses with it. It's not that it doesn't work if you really know what you're doing, but it can really lead you astray when you are early on in a project.
 
I've heard Ramit Sethi mention recently that he wasn't really A/B testing until he was at about $1 million revenue. I recently heard Noah Kagan say "almost nobody should be A/B testing."
 
In this article, I share my experiment with A/A testing, and some of the misleading "results" I discovered.
 
Sponsors
 
 
 
 


181. Ryan Holiday
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Description:
How can your ego hold you back in your aspirations, your successes, and in your failures? Ryan Holiday (@ryanholiday) covers it all in his new book, "Ego is the Enemy." You can buy it at kadavy.net/ego
 
As Ryan talks about in the discussion, he sort of wrote this book for himself. Ryan had an unusual amount of success very early in life. He dropped out of college at 19 to apprentice under author Robert Greene. He worked for a Beverly Hills talent agency, advising multiplatinum musicians, and he was the head of marketing at American Apparel by the time he was about 21.
 
In addition to writing books, Ryan helps other authors market their books. He's worked with authors like Tucker Max, (who we spoke with on episode 29), Tim Ferriss, and James Altucher.
 
In this discussion we talk about how to recognize how ego holds you back in all aspects of life and work, and what to do about it. There are lots of helpful thoughts about how to balance your passion projects with your day job, and we also talk about so-called "pageview economics," something Ryan has a lot of insight into. If you want to know how media works, you should also read his first book, "Trust me I'm Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator." You can find it at kadavy.net/trustme 
 
Sponsors:
 
 
 


182. 30. Buy a $600 lamp. Read more books. (changing your mindset to build a reading habit)
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Description:

The places you invest your money, and the objects you surround yourself with both have a huge influence on how you spend your time and energy, and buying this $600 lamp helped me read more books.

This article is available on Medium. You can just google $600 lamp, or go to http://kadavy.net/medium

Sponsors
http://kadavy.net/treehouse
http://kadavy.net/audible

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-30-buy-a-600-lamp-read-more-books/

 

 



183. Tucker Max
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Description:

Tucker Max (@tuckermax) is best known as a self-proclaimed "asshole." He has written three NUMBER ONE New York Times best-sellers, including "I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell." He is only the third writer EVER to have three books on the nonfiction best-seller list at the same time.

Tucker is a book marketing GENIUS, and it shows in this interview. Since I've been trying the crack the positioning code for a new book lately, it was such a privilege to get Tuckers insights on what makes a book successful.

As Tucker will dissect for us, there's a big difference, psychologically, between an article someone will click on and read on the web, and a book that they will dig into their pockets to pay for. It's absolutely essential to understand this if you plan on writing a book.

By the way, this psychology is relevant to the conversation I had on episode 21 with Nir Eyal: just think of how differently Facebook would be designed if you were PAYING for it!

Anyway, Tucker is using his book marketing Jedi-mind tricks to run a really exciting new business called Book in a Box. They help you take your knowledge, and turn it into a book. It's not ghost writing, which we'll get to in the interview.

Amongst many things, Tucker will dissect for us the difference between a good click bait title, and a good book title, how to feel fulfilled in your life to break free of social media, and how Hillary and Trump brilliantly "flip the frame" on each other.

In case you couldn't tell by now, this episode is more NSFW than usual. Enjoy it with your headphones on.

Sponsors
Treehouse: http://kadavy.net/treehouse
Audible: http://kadavy.net/audible
Active Campaign: http://kadavy.net/activecampaign

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/tucker-max-podcast-interview/

 

 

 



184. 28. Start where you are
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Description:
Tuesday was the 12-year anniversary of my very first blog post. On this week's show, I'm bringing you the top lesson that I've learned from 12 years of blogging.
 
That blog post could easily be the worst blog post I've ever written, but it's actually the best blog post I've ever written.
 
I'll explain why in this short article. You can find this article on my Medium profile at http://kadavy.net/medium
 
Sponsors
Treehouse: http://kadavy.net/treehouse
 
 
 


185. 27. Jeff Goins: Listen to Your Life – creative habit-building, deliberate practice, & finding your calling
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Description:
Jeff Goins is the author of The Art of Work: A Proven Path to Discovering What You Were Meant to Do.
 
In The Art of Work, Jeff explains why finding your calling doesn't always follow the neat storybook path that you expect. You have to listen to your life, engage in painful practice, and build bridges all to let your story emerge.
 
In this discussion, we talk about how clarity comes with action, what makes practice deliberate practice, and why frequency matters more than quantity.
 
He'll also share the most cringe-inducing story of asking someone out I think I've ever heard. Don't worry, there's a lesson to be learned from it. Here's the interview.
 
Sponsors:
 
 
 
 


186. 26. 37 lessons from 37 years
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Description:

I recently turned 37, and this is everything I've learned so far. I originally wrote this post on Medium.

Here's the text of the post, in case you're reading this description:

37 LESSONS FROM 37 YEARS
I have been alive for 37 years. Here is everything I’ve learned:
1. Whenever possible, act now.
2. You’re worth so much more than your eyeballs.
3. What you think is “all in your head,” may actually be in your body. Find a good doctor.
4. Trust your subconscious. It knows your path better than you do.
5. Get therapy.
6. You’re bombarded with mediocre opportunities.
7. Thus, it’s your challenge to ignore mediocre opportunities.
8. You’re bombarded with mediocre friendships and relationships.
9. Thus, it’s your challenge to ignore mediocre friendships and relationships.
10. Most people are dying to distract themselves from their own thoughts.
11. There is a lot of money to be made in distracting people from their own thoughts.
12. Thus, everything around you is built to help people distract themselves from their own thoughts.
13. So, ignore most everything, and make space for your own thoughts.
14. Nobody reads the whole article before commenting.
15. Nearly everybody is “juicing.” They’re making themselves sick trying to catch up with one another.
16. Thus, your challenge is to catch up with your self.
17. You can only know so much.
18. And, your brain is ruled by biases.
19. Thus, you can hardly trust what you think you know.
20. And, you can only know so much about a person.
21. So, if you feel jealous when comparing yourself to someone else, you’re wrong.
22. Take improv classes. It will get you out of your head, and into the moment.
23. Take voice lessons. It really is possible to improve your singing.
24. Only sing in a key that is comfortable for you.
25. Take lessons in a social dance (Salsa, Swing, Tango, etc.) You’ll learn to cooperate, and you’ll have instant community anywhere you travel.
26. Traveling sucks. It’s much better to live in different places for short bursts.
27. What you think is a personality flaw may just be the bad influence of the place where you live.
28. What you think sucks about where you live may just be a flaw in your perception.
29. If you merely suspect something is holding you back. It’s not. You are.
30. When you dream of something, that thing seems impossible.
31. When something you dream of feels impossible, it makes you unhappy.
32. Thus, be comfortable with where you are.
33. But still, dream, while being comfortable with where you are.
34. When you use a bookmark, you invite yourself to forget what you’ve read.
35. Thus, don’t use bookmarks.
36. Smart people do dumb things when the pressure is on.
37. Even though it’s cliché to end a list with something pithy, it ties it up nicely. Clichés are clichés for a reason.

Sponsors

http://kadavy.net/treehouse

http://kadavy.net/activecampaign

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-25-37-lessons-from-37-years/

 

 

 



187. 25. Steve Case: Persevere in "The Third Wave" – how entrepreneurs will transform entrenched industries
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Description:

Steve Case is the former CEO of AOL – America Online. Many of you probably chuckle when you see someone with an email address that ends in AOL.com, but for me and many millions of others, AOL was our first contact with the Internet.

Steve has a new book out called The Third Wave. The premise is that the first wave of the internet was building the infrastructure – things like getting computers with modems into people's homes, and getting them on the internet, the second wave was software-focused – things like Facebook, and now that we have all of that built out, it's time to change more entrenched industries like Healthcare, Food, and Government.

Steve stresses that perseverance is going to be critical in the Third Wave, which is something for all of you Lean Startup practitioners to consider: you can't necessarily abandon your idea because you don't get traction right away. You'll also have to form partnerships – sometimes with big, entrenched organizations that are slow-moving. So, opportunities to create something world-changing by just writing a few lines of code are becoming scarce.

I really enjoyed the book – especially the parts about the early days of AOL. AOL had a huge impact in the 90's, and I remember flipping through channels and seeing Steve on CNN giving some kind of Senate testimony. I don't remember what exactly he said, I just remember thinking it was really next-level stuff to my 17-year-old brain. It was the first time I had any awareness of how entrepreneurs and technology shape culture and shape humanity.

I hadn't realized before reading the book that it took AOL about a decade to really get traction, so it was interesting to hear those stories of the perseverance that is going to be so critical in the Third Wave.

I think Steve's theories about the Third Wave make a ton of sense. Thanks to having infrastructure, we had a good decade or so where our world was reinvented by software, but now there are big challenges in changing slower-moving industries. Even if you're a solopreneur like me, even if you're an employee for life, and you don't have interest in disrupting entrenched industries, it's important to think about these larger trends and how they effect the world around you, and your relevance.

Sponsor: http://kadavy.net/treehouse

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/steve-case-podcast-interview/

 



188. 24. Save Time & Mental Energy With Mind Management and Perpetual Productivity
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Description:

The most popular question (and answer) from my Quora session was "What tips or hacks have saved you the most time and/or energy in your life?" This answer had more than 24,000 views, and was featured in Inc.com. Inc also has tweeted it a couple of times to their 1.6 million followers.

What ended up coming out was a somewhat cohesive philosophy for full output I've devised over the years, and some of the most effective ways of redesigning ones life to fit within that framework.

If you're interested in seeing this answer, as well as other answers from my session, go to http://kadavy.net/quora

Sponsor: ($50 off Pavlok) http://kadavy.net/pavlok

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-24-save-time-mental-energy-with-mind-management-and-perpetual-productivity/

 

 



189. 23. Travel by Your Taste – Jodi Ettenberg of Legal Nomads on lifestyle design, personal discovery, & food
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Description:

Jodi Ettenberg used to be a lawyer. She took a year off to travel 8 years ago, and never went back.

Her blog, Legal Nomads, won a Lowell Thomas Award for best travel blog and has been featured in the New York Times, National Geographic, BBC Travel, CNN, and more.

Legal Nomads is full of tips on packing, planning, and budgeting for travel, as well as beautiful hand-drawn typographic food maps and t-shirts, and guides and translation cards for eating gluten-free while traveling. Jodi has written a book called The Food Traveler's Handbook, which shows you how to find cheap, safe & delicious food anywhere in the world.

This interview is full of wisdom on the benefits and challenges that come with a life of travel. Jodi is really insightful when it comes to recognizing how travel relates to all of human experience. If you're someone who has ever thought about making a big change Jodi did, or if you've ever struggled to be more minimal and have less stuff, you'll find this conversation especially inspiring and enlightening.

You may notice that there are a TON of book recommendations in this interview. There are links in the show notes for all of the books Jodi mentions. Remember, if you buy through those links, you'll be supporting the show.

Sponsors
$50 off Pavlok http://kadavy.net/pavlok
Free install of SumoMe http://kadavy.net/sumome

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/jodi-ettenberg-2/

 

 



190. 22. The Behavioral Revolution (Not The Information Revolution) – using behavioral science & product design to build healthy habits through technology
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 13.33Mb)

Description:

The economics favor digital distraction, but we have everything we need to make humanity great. We have the behavioral science knowledge, and with increasingly ubiquitous technology touchpoints such Apple Watch and The Internet of Things at large, we have a growing opportunity to shape behavior with technology.

The big question is: will this power be used for "good" or "evil?"

Sponsor: http://kadavy.net/treehouse

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-21-the-behavioral-revolution-not-the-information-revolution/

 

 



191. 21. Nir Eyal – Is Silicon Valley Leading Us Into The Robot Apocalypse? Artificial Intelligence, digital distraction, & the dangers of habit-forming products
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 45.69Mb)

Description:

Nir Eyal is the author of Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products. So he is really manufacturing the drug. Fortunately, he's also concerned about the implications of digital distraction, so he agreed to have a discussion with me about it on the podcast.

In this discussion, we cover our views on the potential effects of distraction. Is it making people less creative? Is it as addictive and harmful as smoking? Do we have the agency to free ourselves from technology? And, of course, is it making us vulnerable to a potential robot apocalypse?

Join the discussion in the show notes at http://kadavy.net/podcast

Sponsor: http://kadavy.net/treehouse

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/is-silicon-valley-leading-us-into-the-robot-apocalypse-love-your-work-episode-21-w-nir-eyal/

 

 



192. 20. Kill Your Todo List – Sell Your Ideas to Google (overcoming decision fatigue for better creativity & productivity)
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Description:

Sometimes, the things you feel like you should do create so much cognitive burden you can hardly get anything done. When I feel that way, I know it's time for me to have a "Week of Want." I give myself a whole week where I can work on whatever project I want, without having to think about what goal I'm trying to achieve.

This has brought me great results many times, including writing a blog post, which connected me with Timeful, which later sold to Google.

I talked about the Week of Want a little in my interview with neuroscientist John Kounios, but in this mini-episode, I explain the technique in-depth.

Sponsor: Get 50% off my White Hot Course when you use WHITEHOTLOVE at http://designforhackers.com/whitehotcourse before April 16, 2016.

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-20-kill-your-todo-list-sell-your-ideas-to-google/

 

 



193. 19. Relax! Andrew Johnson on building an app empire; overcoming anxiety, depression, & bad habits through hypnosis
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 56.55Mb)

Description:

Andrew's famous "Relax" app has been a key ritual for me for a couple of years now. Andrew has a whole empire of apps with guided recordings that help people not only relax, but Quit Smoking, reduce anxiety, lose weight, or build confidence, amongst many other things. His apps have been downloaded more than 10 million times.

I have literally found Andrew's apps to be life-changing for me, but I've also been fascinated by these apps as a business. They seem so simple.

But, behind Andrew's apps is more than 20 years as a hypnotherapist, and in this interview I'll be digging into how he got into such an unusual career, what are some misunderstandings about hypnosis, and how did he create his own luck to have the best-selling "self-help" recordings on the Apple and Android app stores. We'll also find out why he lights a candle to do his work.

Andrew's Relax app: http://kadavy.net/relax

Treehouse Sponsor: http://kadavy.net/treehouse

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-19-relax-andrew-johnson-on-building-an-app-empire/

 

 



194. 18. 2-Minute Meditation (Guided)
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Description:
READ ME! Lots of people beat themselves up for not being able to meditate. I think they're too hard on themselves. If you can simply make a habit of meditating 2 minutes a day, you can begin to enjoy meditation to the point where you're ready to do longer sessions.
 
I have little formal meditation training, but this 2-minute meditation is roughly how I do my sessions. Part of it is rooted in what I know of mindfulness meditation, and, from what I've heard of Vipassana meditation, may have some influences from that as well.
 
I started meditating about 10 years ago, off and on, and have "practiced" regularly for about 5 years. Progress has been very slow, but grew more profound as I grew more disciplined about doing it regularly. Meditation has helped me eliminate anxiety, and think more deeply and clearly about whatever I face in work in life. I now relish sessions that are sometimes longer than 90 minutes!
 
There's one BIG limitation about presenting a guided meditation as a podcast: It makes you likely to meditate using a device that is also full of distractions. If you have a device on which to play this file that isn't going to distract you with a notification – either while meditating, or while glancing at the screen afterward – I highly recommend that. It might be an iPod, or I use my iPad, because I don't allow notifications on it. If you don't have anything like this ready to go, don't let that prevent you from trying it out! Try putting your device in airplane mode, instead.
 
This 2-minute format is inspired by my "10-Minute Hack." The idea being that, by setting an absurdly simple goal for yourself, you can "trick" yourself into doing more than you originally set out to do. You can learn more about this trick here: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/the-10-minute-hack/
 
 
 


195. 17. Eight Life Hacks for Health Wealth and Happiness
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Description:

A 10-year-old kadavy.net classic, this "mini-episode" (or is it just an "episode?") distills eight rules of living that make me feel like I really have an edge on the world.

The original post is here: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/life-hacks/

Below is the content of the post:

I’ve noticed in my short existence that I tend to do many things differently from most people. Some of those things probably work just as well, whereas others make me wonder “why doesn’t everyone do this?” Here are eight things that may make you feel like you’re cheating the system, too (in no particular order):

Walk – No, I’m not saying “go for a walk,” I’m saying design your life so that you walk more. Live close enough that you can walk/bike/razor scooter to something that you frequent whether that’s work, a grocery store, a friend’s house, a bar, or preferably – all of them. Why spend 15 minutes driving to a gym to spend half an hour on a treadmill? If you’re fortunate enough to have legs that work – use them. Thomas Jefferson on Walking. Smile – All of the time. Even when the cashier gives you the wrong change. People’s intentions are usually good, especially when they’re dealing with someone who isn’t being a dick. Drink Water – Or I could say “don’t drink soda orcoffee.” It’s a waste of money, health, and teeth. Save your caffeine tolerance for when you really need it. Buy Used – I’ve already told you about my philosophy as this applies to music. Buying my clothes at a thrift store yields items that are not-so-watered-down versions of what I would get at my other favorite clothing store, and that are a fraction of the price. This strategy transfers well to books and furniture. When you buy used you get the adventure of discovery, and avoid the flat artistic experience that comes with only consuming the contemporary. Underorganize – There are a number things you can apply this to, but I can’t give a better example than my “inbox/outbox” method of doing laundry. Should you keep all of your financial documents etc. in a filing cabinet? Probably, but recognize when your organizing reaches the point of diminishing returns. Live Small – What’s that, you can’t afford a three-bedroom, three bath house with a huge yard and garage in a neighborhood where #1 is possible? Good. Then you won’t buy so much crap. You’ll save money in the long run, and you’ll be happier, too. Remember How Adaptable You Are – How long could you live if you were transported to the middle of a forest? You would probably surprise yourself, so don’t be afraid of perceived “big” changes in life. It’s a part of human nature to do what is necessary to reach at least previous levels of happiness, but risks succeeded will get you there and then some. Don’t Make Lists of Rules – or Follow Them (They All End This Way) – Such things are only made by bloggers hoping to get lots of del.icio.us bookmarks. The world is too complex to be condensed into a list of rules.

How do you cheat the system? What are your Eight Life Hacks?

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-17-eight-life-hacks-for-health-wealth-and-happiness/

 

 



196. 16. Earn It
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Description:

This is a mini-episode based upon a previous post here on kadavy.net. The original post is over here: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/earnit/

Sponsor: http://kadavy.net/treehouse

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-15-earn-it/

 

 



197. 15. Sail Around The World (While Running a Business, With Three Kids) – Paul Bennett of Context Travel on overcoming fears, lifestyle design, & streamlining operations to follow your dreams
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 68.33Mb)

Description:

Paul Bennett (@contextpaul) ran his business while sailing around the world with his whole family. He's CEO and co-founder of Context Travel. Context Travel organizes high-quality tours around the world, given by historians, authors, and PhDs. I took a Context tour myself when I was at The Acropolis in Athens a few months back, and it was orders of magnitude better than any large group tour I've been on.

I met Paul through a friend recently, and instantly felt he was exactly the type of person I'd want to have on my podcast, were I to ever have one.

In this conversations, you'll find lots of lessons about overcoming your fears, and turning nebulous dreams into actionable steps. Chances are there are some dreams you have that aren't nearly as crazy as sailing around the world while running a business, and you may find some parallels there. We also wax about some of the benefits of travel (corollaries to this can be find in the "mini lives" mini episode that I did awhile back.)

Sponsors: http://kadavy.net/wpengine

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-15-sail-around-the-world-while-running-a-business-with-three-kids-w-paul-bennett-of-context-travel/

 

 



198. 14. The Solopreneur Manifesto (redefine success, keep freedom in your lifestyle, & diversify your skillset)
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Description:

I'm a pretty dedicated "solopreneur" – an entrepreneur who goes it on their own: no cofounders and no investors. This is a mini-episode in which I introduce the tenets that distill the power of solopreneurship, and which help me remain confident as I move forward as a solopreneur. The content of this episode is also in this blog post: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/the-solopreneurs-manifesto/

Sponsor: http://kadavy.net/treehouse

Sponsor: http://kadavy.net/audible

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-14-the-solopreneurs-manifesto/

 

 



199. 13. Your Weakness is Your Superpower – Maneesh Sethi of Pavlok on breaking bad habits, making the most of ADHD, & hiring
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Description:

Maneesh Sethi (@maneesh), is the founder of Pavlok. Pavlok is a wrist band that gives you an electric shock that helps you break bad habits. It's a crazy idea, so it's definitely gotten a lot of attention. Pavlok has been featured on Good Morning America, The Colbert Report, and Jimmy Fallon. In our discussion we talk about how I used Pavlok to break my bad Facebook habit, and I can tell you, it's extremely effective.

Maneesh is a great example of someone who has taken what he used to consider his weakness, and turned it into his superpower. He has always struggled with focusing, but he's found ways to cope with that, and harness the creativity that is a product of that lack of focus.

You'll find relatable things in this conversation if there's anything you've felt was your weakness. Maneesh has learned to surround himself with people who fill in his gaps, and Pavlok is an obvious product of his struggle with his attention.

Sponsor: http://kadavy.net/treehouse

Sponsor: http://kadavy.net/audible

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-13-your-weakness-is-your-superpower-w-maneesh-sethi/

 

 



200. 12. Stop Reading Books Straight Through. Start Reading in "Layers." (a different kind of "speed-reading")
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Description:

Have you ever been really excited about a book you were reading, only to realize – as you tried to describe it to someone – that you had NO IDEA what it was actually about? This happened to me all of the time, until I realized I was reading the wrong way. This is a mini-episode in which I introduce the "layered" reading approach that changed the way I read books. Now I read more books than ever, while retaining more of what I read. This is a reading of my Observer article Reading for Scatterbrained People With Neither Patience Nor Respect for Authority.

Article: http://observer.com/2015/04/reading-for-scatterbrained-people-with-neither-patience-nor-respect-for-authority/

Sponsor: http://kadavy.net/treehouse

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-12-stop-reading-books-straight-through-start-reading-in-layers/

 

 



201. 11. Hack Hidden Value – Nick Gray of Museum Hack on creating memorable customer experiences, turning a hobby into a business, & keeping healthy habits
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 75.87Mb)

Description:

Nick Gray (@nickgraynews) is the founder of Museum Hack. Museum Hack makes super fun museum tours such as the "Un-Highlights Tour," the "Badass Bitches Tour," and the "Big Gay Met." You've heard in previous episodes such as "Transform Stuff into Things" that I think the world moves forward when someone explores the hidden sources of value that are out there, & gives them form. I've always found Nick to be great at doing just that, not only with Museum Hack, but also with everyday things like sharing an inventive Facebook birthday greeting, or throwing a very rapid but worthwhile cocktail party. We explore this tendency for extracting hidden value in our conversation, in the context of upgrading your social life, using virtual assistants to take care of email while going for a walk, or getting yourself to read more books.

This will also be a useful discussion for anyone who has struggled with whether to turn a hobby into a business, or anyone who has felt the discomfort of charging money for something they enjoy doing.

Sponsor: http://kadavy.net/treehouse

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-11-hack-hidden-value-w-nick-gray-of-museum-hack/

 

 



202. 10. Stop Managing Your Time, Start Managing Your Mind (to maximize productivity, with optimal creativity)
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Description:

Many people think their productivity struggle is one of managing their time. In reality, it's more a struggle of managing their mind. In this mini-episode, I introduce my framework for Mind Management: using knowledge from behavioral science, psychology, and neuroscience to work with the subtle fluctuations of your mind. Check out the article here: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/mind-management-intro/

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-10-stop-managing-your-time-start-managing-your-mind/

 

 



203. 9. Be Decisive. Laura Roeder of MeetEdgar on batching for productivty, 80/20 thinking, & quitting her job to go from freelance to SAAS
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 39.07Mb)

Description:
Laura Roeder is the founder of Edgar, which is (or maybe I should say "who is") a social media automation tool (no offense, Edgar, but you are a tool). Edgar helps you create a library of social media updates that you can schedule to repeat.
 
Laura has been honored at the White House, and spoke at the White House for being in the Empact 100, which is a list of the top young entrepreneurs in the US.
 
I've personally known Laura for about 8 years now, and I've always admired her decisiveness. I've never seen her really agonize over a big decision. In this interview I try to dig into the source of that decisiveness, and the philosophy that drives it.
 
One note in here is that I ended up abandoning a story about how it is – as Laura puts it – I'm responsible for her meeting her husband and CTO. First of all, she's giving me more credit than I deserve, but secondly, wait until later on in the interview, and we do eventually pick that story back up. So be patient.
 
 
 


204. 8. Create "Aha!" Moments – Neuroscientist Dr. John Kounios on the neuroscience of creative insights
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 96.56Mb)

Description:
Can neuroscience make you creative on command? Dr. John Kounios is the Director of the PhD Program in Applied Cognitive & Brain Sciences at Drexel University. He's also co-author of the book The Eureka Factor: Aha Moments, Creative Insight, and the Brain.
 
Dr. John Kounios, studies the neuroscience of insightful thinking. It turns out that insightful or creative thinking is, in fact, a different type of thinking than analytical thinking, and there are conditions that will encourage insightful thinking.
 
In this lengthy discussion, Dr. Kounios unpacks what is unique about insight, and what conditions will encourage insight. We also share specific techniques that each of us uses to get ourselves into an insightful state, including sleep, nutritional supplements, and sensory deprivation.
 
Sponsors
 
 


205. 7. Transform "Stuff" into "Things" (for creative ideas)
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 8.90Mb)

Description:

One of the keys to creating something original and remarkable is being able to see how all of the "stuff" in the world can be created into "things." This is a must-understand for any entrepreneur. Original article: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/stuff-and-things/

Get a 14-day free trial from our sponsor, Treehouse: http://kadavy.net/treehouse

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-7-transform-stuff-into-things/

 



206. 6. Don't let your "baby" get slaughtered – Adrian Holovaty of Soundslice, Django, and Everyblock
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 75.35Mb)

Description:

Adrian Holovaty (@adrianholovaty) has learned the hard way that he wants to retain control of his business. After selling Everyblock, Adrian watched in horror as it was later shut down without warning.

Adrian's new business is SoundSlice (incredible interactive music notation, for music teachers and students), and he's resolved to retain control of his business. 

In this episode, Adrian shares some lessons learned from watching his "'baby' get slaughtered." He shares some useful perspectives for anyone who is on the fence on deciding whether to bootstrap or take funding.

Sponsor: http://kadavy.net/audible

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-6-dont-let-your-baby-get-slaughtered-adrian-holovaty-of-soundslice-django-and-everyblock/

 



207. 5. Stop Traveling. Start Living "Mini Lives" (for self-improvement, self-discovery, adventure, & creative inspiration)
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 13.70Mb)

Description:

"Traveling" by its traditional definition is like licking a filet mignon. You get a taste, but you don't get the nourishment. This is why I stopped traveling, and started living "Mini Lives." Original article: http://observer.com/2014/02/a-month-at-a-time-why-i-quit-travelling-and-started-living-mini-lives/

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-5-stop-traveling-start-living-mini-lives/

 



208. 4. Find your superpowers: Saya Hillman of Mac & Cheese Productions on self-help, community, & personal development
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 63.14Mb)

Description:

After getting fired from her job, Saya Hillman (@sayahillman) made a list of things she wanted to get paid to do. 11 years later, she's made all of those things a reality. She gets paid to play board games, do improv, or scrapbook, for example. Her company, Mac & Cheese Productions runs events that help people face their fears, and connect with others. She shares insights on living a "life of 'yes,'" and finding your superpowers, as well as some productivity tips for running a business while wearing multiple hats. Show notes: http://kadavy.net/podcast

Claim your free Audible Audiobook: http://kadavy.net/audible

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/saya-hillman/

 

 



209. 3. Make Something Remarkable: Timehop's Jonathan Wegener on creativity, hiring, and explosive ideas
https://pdst.fm/e/traffic.libs... download (audio/mpeg, 64.68Mb)

Description:

Jonathan Wegener (@jwegener) spent 3 months traveling to every subway station in the NYC area, meticulously documenting the fastest way to get out of each station. The app he made with the data supported him for two years, until he built Timehop. Timehop is an app that compiles your memories and sends them back to you, and Jonathan built it in a weekend hackathon with his cofounder. Since then, he's raised over $14 million, and hired a great team. He shares insights on hiring great people, creating remarkable products, and getting press that makes things go viral. Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-3-making-something-remarkable-hiring-getting-press-jonathan-wegener-of-timehop/

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-3-making-something-remarkable-hiring-getting-press-jonathan-wegener-of-timehop/

 

 



210. 2. Give Yourself Permission to Suck (for the confidence to break through creative blocks)
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Description:

Are you holding yourself back from starting something because you're afraid you're not going to be good at it? You have to give yourself Permission to Suck. This is something that the best entrepreneurs and creators learn over time.

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-2-permission-to-suck/

 

 



211. Jason Fried
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Description:

Jason Fried (@jasonfried) of Basecamp (formerly 37 Signals) shares his wisdom on cutting through the noise to find your own voice. There are some great nuggets in here about design, and how to be a contrarian thinker. This will be a great episode for entrepreneurs, whether they're experienced, or relatively new. Also, this is the FIRST EPISODE of Love Your Work! Please subscribe, and leave us a review to help us get featured in the iTunes "New and Noteworthy" section. Show notes: http://kadavy.net/podcast

 

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/jason-fried-basecamp/

 

Transcript:

[music]

David Kadavy 00:11 This is Love Your Work. On this show we meet people who have carved out success by their own definition. I'm David Kadavy, best-selling author and entrepreneur. This is the first episode of the show, so if you're not familiar with me, I wrote a book called Design for Hackers, which is a bestseller. It debuted in the Top 20 on all of Amazon. Before that, I was the lead designer for a couple of startups in Silicon Valley, and I freelanced as well. I blog at kadavy.net. That's K-A-D as in David, A-V as in Victor, Y, and you can tell how many times I've repeated that in my life. You can follow me on Twitter at @kadavy, or you can join 60,000 others and take my free design course at designforhackers.com. One thing that's really important to me is helping people build a business and a lifestyle that suits them. It's something that I've managed to do, and I want more people to experience it, and that's kind of the  idea behind the show. With this show, I want to introduce you to people who have created businesses and lifestyles that are all their own. They've achieved success by their own definition and built a life according to their own values. They're not necessarily going to be millionaires, but they will be happy people. As the name of the show would imply, they love their work, and also, I love their work. Now, to help us get the show off to a great start, can I ask you a favor?

David Kadavy 01:26 In this first few weeks of the show we have the opportunity to be featured in the iTunes store in their new and noteworthy section, and this show is a bit of an experiment. I'm launching with a few episodes and I'm going to see how it goes, but this first few weeks is absolutely critical. This is the one chance in the lifetime of this show to really bring in more listeners, and more listeners means I can put more of my energy into bringing you great guests with wisdom to share. But in order for that to happen we need reviews on iTunes. Lots of them. They also have to be positive reviews, but that's, of course, up to you and the actual quality  the show. So can you please review this show on the iTunes store? If you loved it and want to hear more, please give it five stars.

[music]

David Kadavy 02:14 I'm very grateful to bring you this first guest. He is one of my biggest heroes, and he's the perfect example of someone who has built a business and a life according to his own values. Jason Fried - yes, the Jason Fried - hardly needs an introduction. He is the CEO of Basecamp and a New York Times best selling author. Jason co-founded Basecamp way back in 1999. It was originally a web design shop, but they built a little project management app called Basecamp, and now that's the focus of the company. In the process of building Basecamp the company also created Ruby on Rails, which is an open-source web framework that powers thousands of sites. And the thing I admire most about Jason is his contrarion thinking. Whatever the prevailing wisdom is, Jason seems to speak up and explain
why that wisdom is wrong. He intentionally has setup his company small. His employees can live and work wherever they want, and they get a three day week during the summer months.
The company is almost totally bootstrap. I say "almost" because they did take a little bit of investment from the one and only Jeff Bezos of Amazon, primarily just to be able to give him a call once in a while.

David Kadavy 03:23 Jason has co-authored three books, one of which is the New York Times best selling Rework, in which he and his co-founder, David Heinemeier Hansson, share their rules for running a simple business. This interview is about one hour long, and there is so much more that I wanted to ask Jason. It could've been several hours easily. We talk about Basecamp in the beginning, which you may already be intimately familiar with, but stick it out and we soon start digging into the source of Jason's famously contrarion thinking. I'm really fascinated by where it comes from, because I'm someone who tends to be a bit contrarion myself, but  these thoughts, they usually come after I have this deep internal conflict, and it seems like it just comes so naturally to Jason. So that's something that I try to unpack in the interview, and you're going to find some good tips for listening to that mischievous voice in your head. If you aren't already familiar with Jason, prepare yourself. He really spews brilliance. Everything that comes out of his mouth could be quoted, or could be a Tweet or could be the subject of a blog post. He's really easy to interview, which is great because he's one of the first people that I've interviewed. So I'm very excited to bring you this interview. Let's get started.

[music]

David Kadavy 04:44 Okay. So I'm here with Jason Fried in the Basecamp offices, and I look around here, and there's this beautiful wood paneling and it's just a quiet office. I can't help but notice there's nobody here.

Jason Fried 04:58 No one's here. One person's here, but  he's at lunch.

David Kadavy 05:00 Oh, okay. That person's at lunch.

Jason Fried 05:02 That person's at lunch.

David Kadavy 05:03 Well, we are talking here on the day before Thanksgiving, so I wonder if that has something to do with it.

Jason Fried 05:09 A little bit, but also most of the people even who work in Chicago work remotely, so we're a remote company. People across 30 some-odd different cities around the world, and, including the people who are here, we have 14 people in Chicago. Usually any given day there's five of them here, and it might be a different five each day but that's how we work here. Yeah.

David Kadavy 05:28 Wow, five people. Okay. And this is a huge office.

Jason Fried 05:31 It's a big office, yeah. So we have 50 people in the company and we all get together twice a year. We have an office that's built to handle the whole company, but a very small portion of the company is in the office on any given day. Half the office, too, is dedicated to public space. We have a theater. We've got a big kitchen area, a reception area. It is still a large office, though.

David Kadavy 05:54 Yeah. We're in Chicago so there's a little more space available.  So you guys have had this office for how long now?

Jason Fried 06:04 Since August of 2010.

David Kadavy 06:07 Okay. It's quiet, there's lots of space, there's lots of private spaces as well. To what extent do you feel like this office kind of is an expression of your own personality?

Jason Fried 06:19 Well, I think it's an expression of the company's personality, which is probably derived at some point from mine since I was one of the founders. But mostly we're kind of an introverted group for the most part. Definitely there's some extroverted people here though as well, but we try to be respectful of one another's space, and privacy and time. So we kind of treat the office like a library, in that the rules here are kind of like library rules, which is that you walk into a library, everyone knows how to behave. You're respectful of one another. You're quiet. You don't interrupt people. People are studying, and thinking and working, and that's the same way the office here works. So for the most part, even if it's full of people, it's pretty quiet and pretty hush, and  then people can go into these private rooms like you and I are sitting in right now and have a full volume conversation without interrupting people on the outside. Just like a library, they have little side rooms where you can sort of talk loudly and not interrupt people who are reading outside.

David Kadavy 07:14 Yeah, that was always something that bothered me whenever I worked at a company. I might have a bunch of different roles, but I might be ears deep in some code, and somebody would come up, and tap me on the shoulder, and interrupt me and just lose all of it.

Jason Fried 07:28 You lose it all. You lose the focus, the zone, and so we want to protect that because that's a really hard thing to get into in the first place. So if you're in that, we want to make sure that you stay in that as long as possible, versus inviting interruptions all day long, which is what a lot of modern offices are all about these days.

David Kadavy 07:45 Yeah, I can definitely relate to that. I've noticed that before. So you guys started out as a software sort of consultancy, right? Or a web design company.

Jason Fried 07:57 Web design. Yeah, we started as a web design  company.

David Kadavy 08:01 And that was called 37signals.

Jason Fried 08:02 Yeah. In 1999 we launched the company in August, and we were doing website design for hire, but just redesign work for the most parts. So we weren't doing programming. We were just doing visual redesigns. So people already had the sites and we were like, "We can make that site a little bit better," and so they would hire us to do that.

David Kadavy 08:19 Yeah. And now you are concentrated entirely pretty much on this one product, Basecamp.

Jason Fried 08:25 Yeah, Basecamp. And Basecamp 3, the third version of that, just launched a couple weeks ago.

David Kadavy 08:30 Oh, cool.

Jason Fried 08:30 Every four years or so we completely reinvent the product from the ground up. Not a single line of code, not a single piece of design is shared. We make it all over again every four years, roughly. So we just did that for our third major time. Basecamp's been around for 12 years. It came out in February 2004. So about 12 years total now. So we're on the third major version.

David Kadavy 08:50 That's funny. I guess I hadn't noticed that you reinvent the whole product every four years.

Jason Fried 08:55 There's similar themes. So it's a lot like-- think about  cars. We'll take the Porsche 911. Porsche 911 was released in 1963. It's about 52 years old now, but there's been seven generations of the Porsche 911. So every seven years, roughly, they do a new chassis, they do new engines, they do new technology around it. But it's still a Porsche 911. It looks roughly the same. The engines in the back. The driving dynamics are similar. You can identify a 911 that was made today and a 911 that was made 50 years ago. You can tell there's continuity, but roughly every seven years it's an entirely new car. And the same thing is true for like a Honda Accord or a Civic. These lines have been around for decades, but every four, five, six, seven, eight - in cars it's more like five to eight years because it's very expensive to make a new car - they make a new car. It's still an Accord, which means it's a four-door primarily. They have a coupe version too, but it's like a family car. And the Civic's a little bit smaller. They have these themes and these spirits around the things, but they're all new. And so  that's what we do with Basecamp, is that Basecamp today, in 2015, can trace back to base camp classic, which is the first version of Basecamp in February 2004. The themes were similar but the product is reconsidered in a big way every four years, and in between that we just sort of improve the existing version. But then there's a point where you can't pack new ideas onto an old chassis, so we kind of redo the thing from scratch.

David Kadavy 10:26 Yeah, that car analogy is interesting. I'm not totally up on the designs of cars, but I imagine that, say a Honda Accord, there's certain values that are portrayed - values about what a car is and what is important in a car being portrayed in that. And then there's all this changing technology, and then there's certain trends maybe that are influenced by other--

Jason Fried 10:47 Exactly.

David Kadavy 10:48 --what the drivers are used to.

Jason Fried 10:52 Yes.

David Kadavy 10:53 That those sort of things change, and so that sort of calls for a total redo.

Jason Fried 10:59 Totally. And you think about,  like-- I think just cars are really good metaphors for this because you think about the Corvette, which has been around, I think, since the 50s, and there's like a spirit to that car. It's a two-door sports car, it's kind of a long-nose. There's a spirit to it. And even though they don't all look the same over the years, there's a language and an idea behind the Corvette which stays in the DNA of the car, but the car is redesigned and reengineered completely from the ground up every seven years or something. That's just how that industry-- most industries work that same way.

David Kadavy 11:33 Yeah. I mean, they're still positioned, in a way, against other types of cars. The Corvette, it's a different thing from a Camaro, right? It's a different type of person that will drive it and it's different sort of values that person has. Right?

Jason Fried 11:48 Yes. So each car has it's spirit-- it's much like-- look, you are not the same person - I'm not even talking, like, personality - you don't share a single cell in common with yourself from  ten years ago.

David Kadavy 12:00 Yeah.

Jason Fried 12:01 So you're actually-- but you're still David. You're still the same guy. You've changed. Your tastes have changed and your points of view have changed, but you're still you, even though you've been completely reengineered from the ground up in many ways all the time. So there's iterative tweaks, and then at a certain point you're all new. You're actually all new compared to what you were ten years ago.

David Kadavy 12:23 Yeah. So let's talk about that.

Jason Fried 12:24 That's a little bit of a weird analogy, let's stick to the car one. But that's kind of what we're trying to do here, instead of the alternative, which is typically how software works, which is that it's constantly iterated on. Which is good, but that's when the code base gets really difficult to work on at a certain point, because it gets old and the technologies that you build on are kind of old. It becomes hard to work on, you begin to slow down, and you can't handle brand new ideas because you try and fit them into the current patterns and it's like, "But this won't quite fit anymore." So you kind of shoehorn it in, then you make compromises, and that's how things start to get bad over a certain point  of time.

David Kadavy 13:01 Yeah. So let's talk about that DNA, then. Basecamp, for those who aren't familiar, is a project management web app, basically.

Jason Fried 13:14 Yes.

David Kadavy 13:14 I mean, there's probably--

Jason Fried 13:16 There's iOS and android apps, yeah. All that stuff [inaudible].

David Kadavy 13:19 When you started, it's like your main competitor was maybe Microsoft Project.

Jason Fried 13:26 Main competitor has always been the same: email.

David Kadavy 13:28 Email, okay.

Jason Fried 13:28 Email and habits.

David Kadavy 13:31 But when people would think of project management, would they think of email back when you guys were first starting?

Jason Fried 13:39 If you ask people even today what their primary method of working on projects with people is, it's still email. So email is still the biggest. Our industry thinks there's certain products of the time that are the big product, but the biggest of them all is email. And that's not a product, it's like a thing.

David Kadavy 13:58 It's a protocol.

Jason Fried 13:58 Yeah, right. But  that is the thing you're always battling against, is email, phone, in-person habits. That's the thing you're battling mostly against. The biggest thing that you're trying to do is sort of-- there's this idea of non-consumption, which is this concept that there are people out there who work with others, and they need a better way to do that, but they don't know how to do it. They don't use any products to do it yet. I mean, they use products, but they use products that are not built for this purpose, but they just use other things. And they don't even realize that there's something out there that would help them. They're non-consumers. They want to consume. They want something better, but they don't even know something exists. So our industry sometimes thinks that whatever the hot product of the moment is, that everybody uses that. But actually, all things told, a very small slice of people use that, and most people don't use anything. So that's always the biggest  competition in our opinion, is the people who don't use anything.

David Kadavy 15:03 I feel like there's a parallel we draw in there between email and what we were talking about with office interruptions. The email is this sort of portal where anybody can interrupt you, and you're providing a space through which everything is about this project that you're working on right now - all the communication that's happening and all that within Basecamp. What is that DNA of Basecamp?

Jason Fried 15:32 Here's the thing. So the DNA of Basecamp, there's a couple things going on here. No matter what it is that you're working on, if you have a team there's a few things you need to do. I don't care if you are building a building, or you're working on a small school project, or you are putting together a publication or you're building a website, when you work with people you've got people problems. So you need a way to divvy up and organize the work that needs to get done amongst the group.  Our take on that is to-dos, but let's forget our implementation for the moment and just get back to the fundamentals. So you've got a group of people. You want to do some work together or whatever it is. You've got chunks of work, pieces of work that need to be outlined and divvied up in some way and assigned out. You need a way to hash things out quickly. So sometimes you just need to hash stuff out and go informally back and forth really fast. Sometimes you need to slow down and present something, and think about something, and pitch something, and write a thoughtful post or something and give people a chance to write back in time. So there's moments when you need to make announcements, there's moments you need to hash stuff out quickly. You need to keep track of when things are due and what the major milestones are - what's coming up next, when is thing launching or when are we doing this thing together? So there's some dates around it. There's artifacts. There's files, and there's documents, and there's sketches, and there's PDFs and there's stuff that-- typically you need to keep track of that stuff.

Jason Fried 17:00 You want to organize that stuff. You need a place where everyone knows where it is, and where to go to get it and that sort of thing, right? And then finally, you need a way to check in on people. Like, "How's it going?" And, "How are we doing?" And, "Are we doing the right thing?" And, "How do you feel about how we're doing it?" And, "Are you stuck on anything?" Those kind of things. So to me, it doesn't matter the kind of work. When you work with people, those are things, right? Hashing stuff out, divvying up work, dates, artifacts, making announcements, being able to get a hold of people when you need to no matter what their speeds are, that sort of thing, right? So that, to me, is the DNA of what Basecamp's about. It's about understanding how groups actually work together to make progress on something. There's difference too, because there's moments when you're just social and you're just kind of, like, social. You're not trying to make progress there. But when you want to make progress on something, Basecamp comes in and helps you make progress on things with other people.

David Kadavy 17:51 Yeah, and I like that you're--

Jason Fried 17:52 It's a collection. Let me-- it's really a collection. That's the the thing that's always set Basecamp apart, is that it's a collection of unique  tools that work together to help a group make progress on something together. There's many ways to approach things. There's a way to piece together a bunch of separate tools, and duct tape them together and try to point at each thing, or there's a way to buy something that kind of tries to do all those things really well in a simple way, and that's kind of our side. We want to give you one thing that you can use to do all these things together with a group, versus you having to go out and shop for a bunch of different solutions, and try to tie them all together and get people on board on five or six different products.

David Kadavy 18:35 It sounds like you've been able to really think about the abstract needs that are there and separate that experience from the technology itself. It's not Ajax, to use a very 2002 term [chuckles].

Jason Fried 18:50 Very early, yeah.

David Kadavy 18:51 It's not Ajax. It's not about all these individual technologies or something. It is managing these sort of abstract things that are floating in  the ether and making them into something that you can get a handle on.

Jason Fried 19:04 And getting your head around it and getting organized around it is a really important part of working together with people. The thing is that everyone can have their own individual messes, but if you bring someone else into your mess they're going to be like, "Woah, I don't know where things are." So you need to have an organized place, a space, a shared place where you can do this kind of work. But yeah, it's not about technologies. It's not even necessarily about individual feature sets, because when I say, "Hash things out quickly," what I actually mean is-- in our implementation is more of like chat. Campfires are now in Basecamp 3. But in five years chat might not be they way to hash things out quickly. There may be another way to hash things out quickly. So, it's not about staying true to a tool set. It's about staying true to the problems you're trying to solve. This is what gives us the opportunity to resolve those in new ways [crosstalk]

Use it to [crosstalk] technology at hand.

Exactly.

Just like the cars that change over time
with technology.

Jason Fried 20:00 Totally. Yeah. Bluetooth wasn't a thing in cars eight years ago. Now it is. Navigation wasn't a common thing, and now it's in almost every car. So technology moves, ideas move and things you can do change. And that's why I think forcing yourself to reinvent yourself and be willing to look at those technologies and those new options on a regular basis is very viable.

David Kadavy 20:23 Now, when I think about you reinventing the product every four years, I can't help but think about how most people would react to doing something like that or the idea of doing something like that. They would be so scared that everybody would be so pissed when you change everything that they'd be afraid to make a change like that. How do you get over that?

Jason Fried 20:49 Yeah, it's a great question, and the way to get around that is to, again, get back to people. People do not like to be forced into change.  People don't mind change. People hate forced change. So we never force anyone to switch versions of Basecamp. People who've been using Base-- we have customers who've been using Basecamp for 12 years. Same version. They signed up for Basecamp when it was just called Basecamp. Now it's called Basecamp Classic, which is the original version. We've never forced anyone on Basecamp Classic to move to Basecamp Two and no one on Basecamp Two has to move to Basecamp 3. We've made a commitment to our customers to always maintain every major version of Basecamp forever. So if you're happy with Classic, our definition of new may not matter to you. New doesn't matter to you. Consistency might matter to you--

Jason Fried 21:39 But the new customers, it would be to your detriment to have the original interface with the technology of 2002 or whenever it was--

David Kadavy 21:48 2004, yeah exactly.

Jason Fried 21:49 --2004, and somebody shows up and that's what you've got, that would be a problem.

David Kadavy 21:53 Totally. So new customers today who go to Basecamp.com will be signed up for Basecamp 3. That's the only thing they can sign up for. The newest, latest,  greatest version of Basecamp we've ever made before. Customers who've been with us from 2004, some of them might still be on Classic if they've chosen to. Some of them might be on Basecamp 2 if they've chosen to be. Up to them completely, entirely. That's how we solve that problem. We don't force change on anybody ever.

Jason Fried 22:17 You don't run into situations where that backwards compatibility is just impossible to support?

David Kadavy 22:21 We don't support backwards compatibility.

Jason Fried 22:23 Maybe I'm using the wrong terminology there, but--

David Kadavy 22:26 If you start on 3 you can't move to Classic, because there's not a future parity. For example in Basecamp 3, you can assign - this is a small example - but you can assign to-dos to many people. In Classic you can only assign to-dos to one person. So if you're in Basecamp 3 and you assign a to-do to six people, and you try to go back to Classic somehow, you'd lose data because we wouldn't know where to-- you can't move backwards in time.

Jason Fried 22:50 So you've been doing this for a long time. Basecamp has been around for 12 years in itself. The company has been around--

David Kadavy 22:57 16 years.

Jason Fried 22:57 --for 16 years. This  reinventing every four years, is that something that helps you keep it fresh and keep it being something that you want to be doing everyday?

David Kadavy 23:08 Yeah, it's for everybody. It's partially for us. It's fun to make something new and it's fun to improve that thing for a while, but at a certain point you want to make something new again. The way we did it in the past was we kept making new products. So we made Basecamp, then we made Backpack, then we made Campfire, then we made Highrise and then we made the job boards. We've made a variety of things over the years. What ends up happening, though, is that making something is actually the easy part. The hard part is that once it's out in the wild you've got to maintain it. You've got customers using it. They have demands, and you've got to provide customer service, and support and all these things. So we love the act of making new things, but we've decided that we want to focus on making one new thing over and over. That's how we keep it fresh for us, also keep it fresh for the market and keep it fresh for customers, but also not ever  upset existing customers by forcing them on to something new that they're not ready for or they don't want to be in. Something I learned early on - and it's sort of a ridiculous revelation because you just expect that you would know this, but it's one of the things you just don't think about. Software companies especially almost never think about this. People are always in the middle of something, right?

David Kadavy 24:19 So if I release a brand new version, and they're in the middle of a project and they're trying to work on a client project with somebody, and we release a new version, we push some them on to the new one, they're in the middle of something else. They're not ready to move to this. They don't want their software to change in the middle of their project. So once we realized that, we realized, like, "Okay, that's a deep insight and very important. Our product is not their lives. Their lives is their livelihood. The work that they do for their client is what's important to them, and they don't want their software tool that's aiding them all of the sudden changing on them in the middle, because that's really disruptive and anxiety producing and stuff." So that's why we don't  force anyone to change. You've got to get to those human insights. The thing I've noticed most is that the things that drive people away are fear and anxiety. It's not about, "You don't have this feature. You don't have that feature." It's the fear and anxiety attached to forcing me to shift, or forcing me to change, or forcing me to switch or forcing me to do something I'm not ready for - that's where people really recoil.

Jason Fried 25:24 Not having control.

David Kadavy 25:23 Yeah. People don't want to be in a situation where someone's changing up underneath them that they rely on. That's a really uncomfortable feeling. It's like an earthquake. You live somewhere. You rely on the ground to be solid. You trust that the ground will be solid. Then one day the ground starts to shake, and that is terrifying because you can't go hide from that.

Jason Fried 25:45 Have you experienced a couple earthquakes before?

David Kadavy 25:48 I have, and it's terrifying.

Jason Fried 25:48 Yeah, I have too. It's terrible.

David Kadavy 25:49 Terrifying.

Jason Fried 25:50 And they weren't even big ones.

David Kadavy 25:52 No. Right.

Jason Fried 25:52 It's the worst.

David Kadavy 25:53 I'm a Midwesterner, so a small one is a big one for me. But the thing is, if it's really crappy weather-wise outside you can kind of go inside and hide,  but you cannot hide when the earth beneath you moves, and that's a terrible feeling, and that's what software's like to people. When there's this thing they've been relying on that's been consistently working a certain way and all of a sudden it changes on them, that's an earthquake. We don't want to create earthquakes for customers.

David Kadavy 26:14 Yeah, especially this things that they're relying upon to help them--

Jason Fried 26:19 Do their job.

David Kadavy 26:20 Do their job, do their work, to manage their projects. If I'm using a bad word there, I don't know.

Jason Fried 26:25 Totally fine. Actually, what's interesting is we've gone away from the word "project," which maybe we can talk about in a little bit. But yeah, fundamentally, absolutely. People use Basecamp to run projects, and they use it for other things too. Imagine if you're doing work for a client. You're a designer. You do work for a client. You've trained the client on this thing. You've told them this is how it's going to work. This is a client relationship, which is often delicate. They're paying you a lot of money. You might be friends with them, but it's still a delicate relationship at some level. And all of a sudden, this thing you told them was going to work one way, all of a sudden works a different way on Tuesday then it did on Monday. That is a  bad situations, so we don't ever want to put our customers in those situations.

David Kadavy 27:04 Right. You've definitely gotten really comfortable over all these years with your particular way of doing things, but I want to step back a little bit further and get an idea of where it all comes from. I'd say that you're probably known for being a contrarian thinker. Would you agree with that?

Jason Fried 27:26 Yeah, probably. It's funny because I don't think my ideas are contrarian at all, of course, but against our-- let's call it against our industry, yes.

David Kadavy 27:35 Yeah. I think that a lot of people have thoughts from time to time where there's a prevailing wisdom and they think, "Well, that doesn't seem right." But then they think a lot of people-- they bottle it up inside or they don't act upon it. They don't give themselves the permission and the confidence to go ahead and say, "I don't think it should be that way. It should be this other way," and to go ahead with it. I think that that's somethin,  even if you go back and look at the 37signals - which is the former name of the company - 37signals.com/manifesto, there's all these things about, "We're small on purpose," and all these things that are against the prevailing wisdom. "We purposely are not full service," things like that.

Jason Fried 28:23 By the way, even that site itself-- actually, that site is the most contrarian thing we've ever done. We're a web design company. There wasn't a piece of work on that site. It was black and white. It was all text. 37 ideas is what that was. If you think about back then - that was in '99 - web design firms, even today--

David Kadavy 28:45 1999 for those who can't remember--

Jason Fried 28:47 Right, 1999, the previous century.

David Kadavy 28:50 It was a different century [chuckles].

Jason Fried 28:53 But even today, it's all the same. Basically, agency sites are portfolio sites for the most part, which is like, "Here's our  shining work and here's the work we've been doing. Here's pictures of it," and I get that. We didn't have a single picture of any work that we'd done on that site, and the whole idea was that everyone's work pretty much looks the same. If it's good, it's roughly the same, right? But what sets companies apart and people apart, I think, are the ideas that they have, and most companies don't think they way we thought we thought. And so we want to put our ideas out there to make us appear different and to attract the kind of customers that we want to work with, who were people who'd appreciate this kind of thinking, versus just someone who'd appreciate a pretty picture of a website that we made. That doesn't help us self-select our clients. So that was the idea behind that.

David Kadavy 29:38 I think this is something that's so important for people to master, to be able to have a thought that's different from the prevailing wisdom and to give themselves permission to go forth with it. Take us back to 1999 when you decided to make this all text. Was that something-- did you know that it was something different from the prevailing way to do it?  How did you arrive at that and give yourself permission to do that?

Jason Fried 30:04 Great question. We knew it was different. We knew no one had never done anything like that before. It's funny, they were almost like tweets or short blog posts. They were just these really short thoughts. We weren't trying to be different. We just realized that we were, and then we're like-- Originally, one of my partners in the business was a guy named Carlos Segura, who's a graphic designer in Chicago. He has a line that says, "Communication that doesn't take a chance doesn't stand a chance." That's his motto, and that drove us early on, which is like, "Let's take a shot. What do we have to lose here? What we actually had to lose is not being ourselves, and that is a bigger loss than being yourself and not getting traction." If we were trying to act like everyone else  then we weren't really being ourselves, and that's the loss. "So let's take a shoot at putting ourselves out there, doing this differently, and let's see who we attract this way. Everyone's fishing with this lure. Let's put a different lure out and see what we attract, and maybe we attract some big fish that no one else knows how to attract, because everyone things the only way to attract this kind of fish is this way."

Jason Fried 31:20 And it turned out that we landed a couple big projects, and we've been profitable as a company ever since then because of that. I mean, looking back, it's a bold move, but at the time we just didn't think it was bold. We're like, "We have nothing. We have nothing yet. We have no company yet, so we have nothing to lose. So let's take a shot." It's a lot easier now, in my opinion, to be hesitant and being afraid to take a risk when you have something to lose. Like, "We have something to lose. We've got a great business. We've got a lot of customers. We've got a reputation. We could lose that now," and then you get a little bit tight.  So we've tightened up as a company over the years. I think most companies do. But when you're fresh and brand new, that's the time to take a real shot. Why not, you know?

David Kadavy 32:10 It's funny to think about that thought process that you had, because I think-- how old were you then?

Jason Fried 32:17 25.

David Kadavy 32:19 Maybe around 25 was when I started to wise up to, "Okay, these thoughts that I have in my head that are different from the way other people are doing things, I should do something to pursue those," but I think before that I allowed other people's ideas of what success was, or what it meant to what I should be doing, I think I allowed those ideas to-- I know I did. I know I allowed those ideas to dictate my own actions and put me in situations that didn't make me happy. So did you ever experience that sort of thing where you were maybe making decisions based  what somebody else had decided?

Jason Fried 33:02 Oh, absolutely. Yeah. Before 37signals, I was just a freelancer doing website design on my own, and I always referred to "me" as "we." When I was doing proposals I'm like, "We will provide a--" because I always felt like I had to act bigger. I had to act like I was a company. I wasn't a company. I was me. I was just me, and I just thought I had to be something else. I remember at the time-- you've been around for a while, too. You might remember there was something called USWeb, which was like wrapping up all these small web design firms trying to make this big web agency made of-- I don't know if you maybe remember this. I barely remember it.

David Kadavy 33:46 I don't remember that. What year would that have been?

Jason Fried 33:48 That was like mid-90s, late 90s sort of thing. It was like--

David Kadavy 33:54 Mid-90s I was making web pages on my AOL space and not really--

Jason Fried 33:58 Yeah, but so was I. Anyway,  it's just a thing that didn't go anywhere, but I'm like, "Man, my firm might be acquired by a conglomerate." Like, this weird, stupid shit I was thinking about at the time.

David Kadavy 34:14 I remember wanting to work for Razorfish and seeing, "Oh, wow. MTV is a client, and they're doing all these good things." Actually, my thing was Communication Arts magazine.

Jason Fried 34:25 Sure, CA. Absolutely.

David Kadavy 34:25 As a designer, I would pour through the pages, and I'd write down every firm that was there, and I would go to the city and I would call and try to get an interview.

Jason Fried 34:34 I'd do the same thing. Same thing.

David Kadavy 34:37 Really? That's interesting.

Jason Fried 34:37 Yeah. I'd go through these designing [annuals?] and go, "Man, I wish I could do that kind of work." That's actually how I met Carlos for the first time.

David Kadavy 34:41 That's exactly the way I was.

Jason Fried 34:44 Yeah. I think most people are that way. I think it's good. I think it's a good start, and then you come into your own at a certain point. I think your mid-20s are actually a really healthy moment for that. Before that I was wide-eyed, and excited, and wanted to act bigger than I was and wanted  to be more professional. This is the thing. I want to be more professional. That's the thing you have when you're fresh out of school - you want to be a professional. "I need to write really long proposals and I need to talk in a certain way. I need to act a certain way. I need to appear bigger." And that's just insecurity, and it's natural. Like, you don't know. What do you know? You're 21, you're 20. You don't know anything yet, right? So you're trying to act. You're an actor, and at a certain point you become yourself. And I think that's when it's formative, is when you begin to realize-- and I realized this at some point. I realized it by accident. I was doing these long proposals because I thought that's what you had to do. Like, 20-page proposals. I remember writing 20-page proposals about--

David Kadavy 35:47 Oh, yeah. I've done a couple of those.

Jason Fried 35:47 Right?

David Kadavy 35:48 Yeah.

Jason Fried 35:49 And you spend-- I don't know. Weeks and all-nighters, and you write these proposals--

David Kadavy 35:53 You don't get the job.

Jason Fried 35:53 You don't get the job, right? And then I realized-- first of all, I hate writing 20-page proposals. I think they're a waste of time. Because here's what  happened to me. My parents were doing a kitchen renovation at home, and they were getting these proposals from contractors. I saw them look at them, and all they did was they turned to the last page. Like, "How much is it going to cost and how long is it going to take?" That's all you care about when you get a proposal, because to get a proposal from somebody, you've already vetted them at a certain level. Like, "I'm curious about what they would do for me. I know who they are, so what would they do?" You just want to know, how much is it going to cost and how long is it going to take? So I realized this. I'm like, "I'm doing these 20-page proposals. I'm busting my ass on them. I don't like doing them. It's what you're supposed to do, right? Or is it?" So I started doing shorter, and shorter and short proposals and started winning jobs. At the end of my freelance career I was doing single-page proposals, and I wasn't losing any business over them. I realized, "Holy shit, I don't need to do what everyone else is doing. I thought this is how you had to do it, but you don't have to do it that way." That's where I gave myself permission to go, "Well, what else don't I have to do that everybody else is doing?"

David Kadavy 37:01 Okay. This is exactly what I'm looking for. This is the time when you slowly started making the proposals shorter and shorter, and you realized that this thing that other people had told you was so, or somehow you had come to the conclusion was true, was in fact not true.

Jason Fried 37:18 It was in fact not true. I don't even know if people told me, or I just thought you-- I don't even know.

David Kadavy 37:23 It was more than not true. It was false.

Jason Fried 37:24 It was false at a variety of levels. It was false that I had to do that to get jobs. It was false that I had to stay up late and  bust my ass to get work. It was also false that it would make me happy. I was miserable making these long proposals, so I realized if I can eliminate the misery, and I don't have to stay up late, and I can be concise, and get to the point and present my work clearly in a page or two, man, that's a bunch of wins, plus it's a win for the customer on the other side. And I told them that. I'm like, "Look, I know how proposals are. You're just going to look at the--" I said this in my proposal. I'm like, "I know how proposals are. You thumb through a bunch of stuff, and at the end of the day you just look at the price and how long it's going to take, because you've already seen my work because that why you've asked me to submit a proposal. So I don't need to go through all my work again. Here's how much it's going to cost. Here's how long it's going to take." That was my pitch, basically. Like, "Look, let's cut through the bullshit, because that's going to represent how I'm going to work with you. I'm not going to bullshit you. I'm going to be direct and clear, and we're going to work concisely together." It was like an embodiment of  how we're going to work also. That resonated with people. Then I started to realize, "Man, I don't have to be like everybody else. This opens up opportunities." Now, I didn't see all the other opportunities. It was just like a moment where I could poke the way you're supposed to do it and get away with it, and then like, "Oh, maybe I can do this more." So I started doing more things like that.

David Kadavy 38:57 There's sort of a sense of mischief to it. It kind of makes things more fun that way.

Jason Fried 38:59 Absolutely.

David Kadavy 39:00 I know I'm that way where if I get stuck in a rut, I just kind of say, "I'm going to just write this silly, mischievous blog post or email," and suddenly it feels fresh and people respond more.

Jason Fried 39:12 Absolutely. This is something I'm actually thinking about here right now. Next year there's some stuff I want to do that doesn't seem like it would be a reasonable thing to do. Like, it would be difficult to justify in the same way  that I think a single page proposal would be difficult to justify until you realize it works, and then you don't have to justify anymore because it becomes true. And so there's a couple things - I'm being very vague here because I don't want to talk about it quite yet because I haven't formed any ideas thoroughly - but there's a couple things I want to do that seem counterintuitive to our own company or our own way of working that I want to ruffle a bit.

David Kadavy 39:58 Yeah. So it sounds like you're trying to shake things up a little bit in the office. You don't want to get too complacent in doing things a certain way. Is that going to bring some freshness, or what's driving that?

Jason Fried 40:10 Yeah. Well, that's part of the whole-- reinventing Basecamp is part of that. Like, being on this schedule where we have to reinvent Basecamp on a frequent basis. It's not that frequent, but like four years.

David Kadavy 40:19 Four years is [inaudible].

Jason Fried 40:20 But yeah, in this industry-- actually, it seems like a long time in some ways, but--

David Kadavy 40:25 Yeah.

Jason Fried 40:26 My opinions change over the years, and I have new ideas, and a thought comes to mind, and I've been doing some--  one of the things that's been interesting is I've been doing a lot of in-person demos of Basecamp 3. I've never really done a lot of in-person demos of Basecamp before, and it's been really interesting because I'm seeing some really cool insights that come from followup questions. We've always thought about demoing Basecamp with videos, or tutorials or whatever, right? But what I've realized is that that kind of demo doesn't lead to followup questions, and followup questions are really valuable, because that is where someone requests or looks for clarity. Like, "Wait. What do you mean by that?" Or like, "Wait, how do you do that?" Or, "Wait, how do you think about that?"

David Kadavy 41:21 It's kind of like where they ask the question that they were initially too afraid to ask or something like--

Jason Fried 41:26 That's a good way to put it.

David Kadavy 41:27 --but they thought was a dumb question before, but somehow--

Jason Fried 41:30 Totally. [crosstalk] That's a great way of putting it.  Yeah, a great way of putting it. Those moments, I'm realizing, are extremely valuable, very valuable. In fact, it's almost all the value. Yet, when you do a lot of self-service stuff you don't get to that value because you don't talk to the person, right?

David Kadavy 41:49 See their facial expressions or--

Jason Fried 41:51 Yeah, or just the things that-- it's like a comedian. A comedian writes material, and if they want to do a one-hour show on HBO, they spend a year in the clubs perfecting that material They don't know how audience are-- they think all the stuff they're writing down is funny, but they've got to try that stuff out. You've got to try it out in front of an audience and see what reactions-- and sometimes the audience give a reaction on something that you didn't think was going to be that funny, or they react to the timing or something. You've got to try that stuff out. So what's been interesting is I gave a couple of demos of Basecamp 3. One of the interesting features of Basecamp 3 is-- it's such a basic thing. You can create folders, and you drag things into folders to  organize them your own way, and I got a standing ovation from this one group [chuckles]. I was really surprised by that. It was not something that I thought was going to be like this eureka moment for people, right? But I had to be there to see that, to feel it, to know that there's something there now. Then I can follow up on that and get-- wow. I'm like, "Whoa. Why was that such a big deal for you." "Oh, because--" and then you get the because.

Jason Fried 43:06 Every word after because is gold, you know? You don't get that when you just kind of like put material out there that people can do on their own. So I want to do a lot more in-person stuff next year. This is stuff that does not scale. We have well over 100,000 paying customers. We have a very big business. Tons and tons of customers, millions of people use Basecamp. I can't possibly demo it for all of them, right? But  I don't have to. What if I can demo Basecamp to 200 companies a year? What if I could do that? How much better would the product be? How much better off would they be and how much better off would we be? I think it's undeniable that there'd be a deep value there, and I want to think about doing that kind of stuff. Anyway, that's very different from how we've ever done things before. So that's just one of the things I'm thinking about, but I just feel it's really important to shake up your own thoughts from time to time.

David Kadavy 44:02 Yeah, and I love this idea of these insights of these things that you are taking for granted in a way for whatever reason - maybe it was an obvious solution to make the folders draggable like that - and then it just blows away these other people. I think that that's something that-- I find that myself just in trying, or I have found that in trying to find my own entrepreneurial voice or deciding what to do in my own career, is that every once in a while somebody  will make an observation. They say, "Oh, you're really good at explaining things," or something like that. And you're like, "Well, wait. I didn't know that." Was there anything like that for you personally that helped you find your own path in the early days of 37signals or something? Things that you didn't necessarily know that you were good at but you later discovered through observations like that.

Jason Fried 44:58 Yeah. I'm not sure if it's a specific thing other than like a way of looking at things. So we would do work for clients all the time, oftentimes bigger clients. Like, back in the early days we'd do work for Hewlett-Packard or something. We did a website for them. And I'd be sitting in a meeting with them, and there'd be a lot of people on the table, and they'd be talking stuff through, and they'd be like-- they'd be talking stuff through, putting the ideas through their own process, which often involved a lot of people, followup meetings and a whole timetable to get something  to try something. I'd be like, "Why don't we just try it right now? Why don't we just make the change right now and just look at it together?" That, to me, was like, "Of course. If we want to see how it looks, let's just do it, and then let's look at it." For them, that was just like a revelation. Like, "What? But doesn't it have to be this, and that and approved?" I'm like, "It could be, but it doesn't have to be. Right now, let me pull out my laptop, and I'll make the change, and I'll hit reload and let's look at the page." That came from me being a freelancer. I was working on my own. I had no one else to talk to. No one else to rely on. I had to do it all myself. I did all the HTML and design. There was no process.

Jason Fried 46:18 So for me, just growing up that way in the industry, helped me realize that you don't need a lot people to get things done. You don't need a lot of process to try stuff. But a lot of the clients I worked with early on, they couldn't believe-- they're like, "You're a genius." I'm like,  "I'm not a genius at all. That is like the worst label to give me. I'm actually being a simpleton." I'm just being like, "Let's just change it and hit reload." So it wasn't like a thing. It was just a way of cutting through. So what I saw there was that process creates layers, and layers and layers, upon which you then begin to rely. And you don't realize that there was a time, when you didn't have to have all those layers, but you've become used to them and you think then that's the only way. So I think what I was good at early on was coming in and cutting through that stuff, and being like, "We don't need to do all that. Let's just do it this way." And they'd be like, "What? What? You're not allowed to do it that way."

David Kadavy 47:15 Again, it goes to this contrarian thinking thing. I'm trying to figure out like how much of it is your DNA and then how much of it was-- was there ever a time--? Huh. I guess what I'm trying to figure out is-- I think that, yeah, I can show a lot of  people, "Here we're talking with Jason Fried. He sees things differently from the way other people do," but somebody can't just flip a switch and start thinking in their own way or gain that confidence. Was there ever a time when you didn't have the confidence to do that, and how'd that happen?

Jason Fried 47:53 Oh yeah. I mean, I've always had a world view, I think, which is things are simpler than they appear actually. Which is funny, because they're also way more complicated than they appear. What I mean by that is that things can be simpler. Like, whatever the thing you're trying to solve, there's a simpler version of that. I've just always had that in me, that I'm like, "There's no way this is the only way we can do this. We can do this simpler. We can be clearer about this--"

David Kadavy 48:18 What do you think was the earliest example you can think of--

Jason Fried 48:22 Of that?

David Kadavy 48:22 --where you did that?

Jason Fried 48:29 I remember back before  the web was around-- the way I got started in any of this stuff was I made this program called AudioFile, which was a music organizing tool. It was like iTunes kind of way, way back, but there was no digital music. So it was just like a way to organize your CDs and your tapes. Because I had bunch, and I was loaning them out to friends and never getting them back.

David Kadavy 48:51 Tapes, for people who don't know, was this thing that had two reels on it and there was this tape-like thing that had music on it.

Jason Fried 48:57 It was actually tape. It was tape that moved [chuckles].

David Kadavy 49:00 It wasn't sticky.

Jason Fried 49:01 Right. It was magnetic and weird. Anyway, so I would loan stuff out to friends and never get it back. I didn't know who borrowed it and I didn't know-- so I'm like, "I need to organize this stuff. I need to get my stuff together." So I started looking on AOL, actually, because the internet wasn't around. This was like the early 90s. But AOL was around. There was software boards and stuff where you could download shareware and stuff. I downloaded a bunch of these music apps, because there was lot of other people who had this problem, and I just found them incredibly complicated, and just really  weird, and strange, and ugly and all the things that-- it's still subjective, but my aesthetic was not being satisfied by their aesthetic. I'm like, "I don't know how to do this, but I need something, and I'm going to make one myself." So I just got FileMaker and learned how to do it, and made a much, much, much, much simpler version, because I just made something that I knew I needed. And it wasn't about imagining what everyone else needed, it was just like, "What do I need?" And I was able to cut right to that, and it became very successful product. I made $20,000 off this little shareware thing.

David Kadavy 50:08 Just getting checks in the mail and--?

Jason Fried 50:10 Yeah, and this was the revelation that I could do this for a living. So I put in the [product?]-- just like it was shareware, which is like, "You could use it for free, but if you like it, send me 20 bucks, and here's my home address." So people started sending me $20 bills, and I'm like, "Holy shit, I can do this."

David Kadavy 50:29 Were there moments of doubt along the way?

Jason Fried 50:31 Never, because I  didn't care.

David Kadavy 50:33 You didn't care. It just happened.

Jason Fried 50:33 It was for me. The product was for me. If no one used it, didn't care. And that's how I've always tried to make it, which is like-- we still make Basecamp for ourselves. We need Basecamps to run our own business. I care a lot more now because we have tons of customers and we've got a payroll - 50 people - and the whole thing. But fundamentally it's still we want to make something for ourselves, because we know there's a lot of people out there just like us who need what we need. That's how we look at it. But with AudioFile, the first thing ever, I was in high school or whenever it was, and there was never a moment of doubt because it didn't matter if anyone used it. It was a miracle that anyone did. But I needed it for my own thing, and so it wasn't even about confidence. It was like, "I need it anyway." That's how I kind of learned graphic design, and learned a little bit of software development, and learned usability, and learned about customer feedback and all that stuff I learned through those channels because I'd made my own little software thing.

David Kadavy 51:32 So there are no existential crises over like, "Should I do this or that?"

Jason Fried 51:40 I think the biggest one we had recently in the company was deciding to go all in on Basecamp, and then what to do with the other products and stuff. That was like an existential thing, but it was like a moment, and there was risk involved and all that stuff. Those moments still come up. I mean, deciding what to do with a product. Do we release it this way or release it that way, and how do we price it? We have those discussions and decisions all the time, but I try not to worry about it too much. I worry about it probably more than I should still, but it's like, "Let's make a call, and move forward and see how it does."

David Kadavy 52:17 All right. I've got a few questions that are a little more canned questions as we wrap up. What's the biggest compromise that you've had to make in your career to have the success that you have?

Jason Fried 52:30 Well,  the biggest compromise. That's a really great question. I've never been asked that question. I love when I've never been asked a question before. Those are great questions. So I made a compromise-- I'll talk about inside the business, and this is interesting because it turned out to be a great thing. So David, who's my business partner-- I'd had two partners originally in 37signals and then they both left, and so it was just me. And taking on another partner was a compromise in some ways, because it's, to me, like, "I'm running the show now, and now I'm going to bring someone else in and someone else's opinions are going to matter at that level." So it was like--

David Kadavy 53:19 And David, by the way, could be called a contrarian thinker as well, right?

Jason Fried 53:24 Absolutely.

David Kadavy 53:25 So lots of opportunities for you to disagree.

Jason Fried 53:27 Yeah, and we do disagree. We still disagree deeply on certain things. We agree on
most things, and then there are some things that are on the edges that we disagree on deeply, which is really healthy, and that's my point. Sometimes it feels like I have to give-- it would be easier if I could just do whatever I wanted, right? But the company wouldn't be better, and that's what I've come to realize, and I realized it pretty early. I'm just talking about the moment of thinking on taking on another partner, again, was this moment where I have to make compromises, and it turns out that compromises are actually really damn good things to make sometimes. But at the time I just remember thinking, "I've got it all now." And this actually includes ownership in the company. I owned a 100% of the company, and David came on as a partner and now he owns a piece. He owned more and more over time. Looking back on it, it's one of the best decisions I've ever made, but I just remember, going back, thinking about--

David Kadavy 54:28 It was a point of tension, right?

Jason Fried 54:29 Yeah, absolutely. Internally.

David Kadavy 54:30 It could have gone either  way.

Jason Fried 54:32 It could have gone either way. Also, I talked to my dad about it, and my dad's always been someone who's like, "Never have a partner in business. Never take on a partner because a lot of them dissolve and it gets really messy and horrible," and I've been really fortunate to always be able to work with great people. But this is not a compromise I've considered recently. I'm thrilled with how things have turned out. But I just remember at the moment really feeling like I'm taking--

David Kadavy 54:57 And the two of you had worked together before that point. It wasn't just blindly going into this partnership.

Jason Fried 55:02 No. Yeah, we'd worked together, and I actually encourage people to do that. I hired David--

David Kadavy 55:06 Like dating before getting married.

Jason Fried 55:07 Yeah, absolutely. And I hired David as a-- David was still in school when I first met him, and I hired him. He only had ten hours a week to give me as on a contract basis to build Basecamp. Actually, before that we were working on some client work together as a contractor, because we didn't have any programmers on staff and he was the first programmer I had ever worked with. This client hired us to build an intranet for them and we're like, "We can do the design,"  and they're like, "Well, we want you to do the back end too," and I didn't know how to do that. I found David, and he did it with us. Anyway, we had experience working together on multiple levels, but it's still-- like, the moment you decide to bring someone into your business, as the remaining founder, it's a difficult moment. Even though [crosstalk].

David Kadavy 55:58 I [?] it myself. I own 100% of my business, and it would be kind of agony to make a decision like that.

Jason Fried 56:07 Totally. And I think there's still times-- I'll speak for David. I'm guessing David feels the same way, that there's times David would just like to do things his own way and there's times I'd like to do things my own way. But the fact that we can't do that and we discuss these things with each other, we end up with something better. But there's also, of course, frustrating moments for everybody in every relationship. I mean, it's a relationship, right? And that's cool, but it is important, I think, when you--  I think a lot of entrepreneurs these days look for founders. They're like, "I need a co-founder. I need a co-founder. I need a co-founder." So they just go out and try and find one. You've got to date someone first, basically, for a while. I really think that's important. Because people are complicated, money is complicated, and people and money together is extremely complicated. There are few things in the world that are more complicated than that, and that's the kind of complication you're getting yourself into when you take on a partner in a business.

David Kadavy 56:59 Yeah, it's almost like this commodity approach to something that's so personal, or a person. Co-founders. Like, "Oh, I'm just going to grab some milk at the store."

Jason Fried 57:11 Yeah, it's not that way.

David Kadavy 57:13 "I'm going to go grab a co-founder."

Jason Fried 57:14 It's not that way. Especially if you're in a business 50/50 or something, like a lot of people do. They start out co-founder for 50/50. Actually, 50/50 is the worst number in business. There needs to be tiebreakers. But anyway, that's another topic. But anyway,  as far as compromises - to get back to that - I think at the moment it was a major compromise that I had to get over, but I'm so glad that I did. But it was a big moment.

David Kadavy 57:41 Yeah. Well, that's a great one. I'm so flattered to have asked you a question that you hadn't been asked before [chuckles].

Jason Fried 57:45 I love that.

David Kadavy 57:47 I'm sure you've been asked a lot of questions. What was the last book that you read that changed the way that you saw  something?

Jason Fried 57:52 A great questions too. I typically do not like business books. I find them boring and too long, but I read something recently which I don't even consider to be a business book. A book called--

David Kadavy 58:03 It doesn't have to be a business book, by the way. It could be about-- Adrian, who I talked to, said he read a book about ants.

Jason Fried 58:11 Totally. And I know that book, and he told me about it and it's on my list. But just being honest about it, the last thing I read that really changed my mind on something happened to be a business book.

David Kadavy 58:23 Got you.

Jason Fried 58:23 Although, actually there's-- can I give you two answers?

David Kadavy 58:26 Yeah, absolutely.

Jason Fried 58:27 Okay. So one of them was a business book called Turn the Ship Around, which is a wonderful book by this guy named David Marquet, who  was a captain on a nuclear sub, and he was brought in to turn the worst sub in the Navy around. Like, turn it from the worst sub in the Navy to the best, and the way they measured this was sailor satisfaction, people who wanted to sail on that ship again. There's a variety of things. I don't remember all of the details, but it was like-- let's say there was 100 of them. It was number 100. The worst.

David Kadavy 58:56 Yeah, wow.

Jason Fried 58:57 And they brought him in to make it great, and he did it by doing something extremely contrarian. In the military it's all about orders. You give orders.
Business is often structured a lot like military. The orders come from the CEO and we all follow the orders, right? And he realized, "Look, there's 800 people on this ship. I'm one of those 800. If I'm the one getting orders, then there's only one brain on the ship. It's mine. What a terrible waste to have 800 brains  but only one of them has to work, and everyone else just does what I say. That is a waste." So he decided not to give any orders, which is something the military-- you don't do. It's the opposite of what you do. The only order--

David Kadavy 59:47 This sounds like a great book.

Jason Fried 59:47 It's a wonderful book and it's a great story, and he tells it. It's not a business book at all, by the way. It's not at all. But it's sort of like--

David Kadavy 59:54 Lots of parallels.

Jason Fried 59:54 Tons of parallels. But it's not a business book. He talks about how the only order he reserved for himself was the order to fire a weapon that could kill somebody. So if they had to fire a torpedo, that was still on him. Everything else-- what he did was, he said-- and it took him a while to make this work, which is what's really cool about the book is he is very honest about the failings of it initially. After he enacted the system, everything in his bones told him to step in and fix these problems, but he's like, "No, I got to let this settle out the way I want it to." Anyway, was that people were not-- so the way that it typically worked  is people would come to him, and they'd say, "Captain, what should I do?" Or whatever it is, and he'd be like, "Turn this ship 30 degrees starboard," or whatever. I don't know. They'd be like, "Aye, aye captain," and they'd go do it. He'd give the order. But what he wanted people to do instead was to come to him and say, "I intended to turn the ship 30 degrees," and then he could okay that. But the point is that his okay would just-- they're already saying what they're going to do. They have to, in their mind, already know what they're going to do. They can't come to him to ask him what to do. They have to come to him and tell him what they intend to do.

David Kadavy 61:12 They have to go through that whole mental process of taking it through which is--

Jason Fried 61:15 "Because if he says yes, I've got to do this now."

David Kadavy 61:17 Yeah.

Jason Fried 61:16 "And I came to him with the idea." So he got people to come with intent--

David Kadavy 61:20 Accountability there.

Jason Fried 61:21 Totally, and think it through and come with intent.

David Kadavy 61:25 And ownership [crosstalk]--

Jason Fried 61:25 And that changed everything. Totally. And they started thinking. It took a while because it was weird at first, and this is part of  the thing, is whenever you enact something new at a company, it's very easy to fall back on, "This isn't going to work. This is too weird." But he talked about the process of getting over that and giving it space and distance to see if it would work, and it turned out that it worked and became the best ship in the navy.

David Kadavy 61:47 That's a great recommendation.

Jason Fried 61:49 It's a wonderful book.

David Kadavy 61:50 I will read that book.

Jason Fried 61:50 He's a wonderful writer and a very honest storyteller. So there's that book, and the other book is a book which has the cheesiest cover ever and also a very cheesy title. It's called the Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living, and it's like the cheesiest-- the book cover is someone doing a cartwheel in a field.

David Kadavy 62:09 Stress-Free Living.

Jason Fried 62:11 It's horrible. But it's this guy--

David Kadavy 62:13 Made by the Church of Scientology?

Jason Fried 62:14 It looks like it would be, but it's actually the Mayo Clinic, which is like the world's best hospital. This guy who wrote it is a doctor there who sort of unlocked a couple of really interesting truths about the brain and how to reduce stress in your life,  and it's fascinating. It changed my life in terms of-- I haven't mastered the techniques, but they've influenced me greatly. The number one thing I'll tell you about it is that basically there's a sense-- what he's realized - and different religions and theologies have come to similar conclusions, but he's trying to make this very practical - is that there's two modes of the mind. There's the default mode and the focused mode. The focused mode is when you're working. He talks about when you're really into something, it's all you're thinking about, and you're cruising and you're nailing it, right? But when you're not focused and you're wandering, your mind tends to wander towards worry. It tends to wander towards-- you start having these thoughts in your head about the things you should be doing, the things you're not doing, and, "What's going to happen if I do this?" And, "Oh my God, global warming. We're all going to die." You just start-- because evolutionarily, you're programmed to do that, because if you just--

David Kadavy 63:31 It's amygdala taking over.

Jason Fried 63:32 Yeah. It's like, "There's a tiger who's going to kill me, and I've got to be wary." But he's like, "In the modern world, most people don't have those things anymore." We're pretty safe. Not everywhere, but most places. So you've got to get your mind off the default mode, which is the wandering mode, and back into focus. So he helps you figure out ways. Some people do meditation. He's like, "Meditation's a wonderful thing if you have all this time to commit to it, and learn and really master it--"

David Kadavy 63:59 Is that something you've tried?

Jason Fried 64:00 I have, and I've never been able to do it very well. So this really spoke to me, because he's like, "I think meditation is a wonderful technique, but it's not a practical technique for most people." In fact, a lot of meditation's about just letting your thoughts come and go, and that's when you have a lot of the bad thoughts. It's very hard to really, really master that technique. So anyway, I'm not going to get into deeply, but the book's wonderful. It's really, really approachable, and there's just some really good fundamental things that have sort of changed my way of dealing with those moments when I race  towards bad thoughts, how to deal with those in a practical way. Anyway, those two books I highly recommend.

David Kadavy 64:39 This is my first time asking this one. Do you make your bed?

Jason Fried 64:44 No. I sometimes throw my bed. Like, I kind of just flop the sheets so it looks made up. But no, never been into that.

David Kadavy 64:57 Just, one of these things I'd heard over and over again is, like, "You should make your bed," and I started doing it.

Jason Fried 65:06 It's like a thing you just--

David Kadavy 65:08 It's one of these things I never did when I was a kid because it was like, "It's such a waste of time, mom. I'm not going to make my bed."

Jason Fried 65:12 The reason why I don't do it is because I don't like made beds. When I go to a hotel the first thing I do is I tear the bed up. I don't like them--

David Kadavy 65:20 I kick sheets from under. I hate having my feet trapped.

Jason Fried 65:22 Me too. I don't like things tucked in and tight that way. I like it to be semi-presentable on a certain level, but I don't  go through the details. I certainly don't tuck things in.

David Kadavy 65:34 Yeah. You maybe flatten it out a little bit or something.

Jason Fried 65:36 A little bit. Sometimes, but not all the time.

David Kadavy 65:38 So it's not all just a bunch of--

Jason Fried 65:39 A flop. Yeah, floppy.

David Kadavy 65:41 Yeah, just flop it. When have you left money on the table?

Jason Fried 65:49 All the time.

David Kadavy 65:50 And what did you get in return? I guess the question I'm really asking is, what sort of values have you guided-- because money is a certain value, and then there are other values. What are the values that have guided your decision making?

Jason Fried 66:06 I've never ever been someone who's been interested in squeezing the last dime or penny out of anything. I don't find that to be interesting at all. I don't find extreme optimization to be interesting, like, "How can we move the numbers by .5%? Because there's money out there that we're not--" That doesn't do it for me, and also I feel like there's a moment where - this is very non-scientific - you're doing well enough.  It's about enough. And we continue to make efforts to grow the business revenues, and we always have every year. Our revenues are higher than the previous year. Our profits are greater than the previous year. I'm a fan of that level of growth, but I'm not a fan of trying to bust our ass to make 10% growth if naturally we can just do 8. If we can just do 8, I just don't need 10, you know what I'm saying? I just don't need that, so--

David Kadavy 66:57 That last 2% is what ruins your life [chuckles].

Jason Fried 67:02 Exactly, and so I've just realized that, "Hey--" I'm just making numbers here. "If we can do 5% growth, I'm actually pretty happy with that." We do more than that, but what if we did just do 5% every year forever? That's pretty damn good still. That's wonderful. Fine. What if we could do 20% with a simple change? I'd love that, but I'm not gonna bust my ass to try and go from 5 to 6. That just doesn't interest me. So those kind of things don't interest me. What interests me is having--  I do believe in creating cushion. So I do like to have room. I don't like to feel like we're so tight that payroll would be a problem. That is something I've never had to deal with, and I don't want to deal with that. So I always want to create very healthy margins and lots of room to try to experiment and not struggle through those things. I've always worked that way, but I've never looked at the numbers and felt like I need to move the numbers in a meaningful way by squeezing. So I'm not a numbers-driven CEO in terms of like, "There's got to be a way to pick up more," but I'd also think that there is plenty more to pick up, and I'm interested in picking it up as an exercise, but not because I feel like we must. That's kind of how that happens.

David Kadavy 68:32 What do you feel  like you get in exchange?

Jason Fried 68:33 By the way, I'm also big fan of just profit. So getting back to that, numbers for me have never been about top line growth or revenue. It's about profit, because profit to me is food, air and water for a company and it allows the company to continue indefinitely, and that's sort of what I want. Revenues do not do that, profits do. So I'm very big in the profit generation and not just trying to grow. Companies are like, "I want to get to $700,000,000 in revenues so we're worth $44,000,000,000." If they're only making $3,000,000 off all of the effort that goes into making [?], that doesn't interest me. Anyway, that was just an aside there, but I forget what else you were saying.

David Kadavy 69:15 What do you feel like you get in exchange for leaving that money on the table?

Jason Fried 69:19 A lot less stress. A lot less worry. Those things. And also just, I think, time back, and also a focus on more important things, like taking care of people.  We do a lot of really interesting things for employees here that, if I was financially driven, I couldn't justify these expenses. We do some very expensive things for employees. Above and beyond salary, above and beyond benefits, but just other things. I don't need to go into them specifically, but they don't make sense from a financial standpoint, but they make sense to me as someone who wants to create great experiences for employees who spend their days working for me and I get to work with them. So those are the things you get when you don't worry about those other things.

David Kadavy 70:16 Do you have a final message for our listeners? Any parting words that you'd like to give them?

Jason Fried 70:22 Well, tell me about the listeners. Who are the listeners? Tell me about the audience.

David Kadavy 70:26 The audience. Well gosh, I don't know. You've really stumped me with that question, Jason [chuckles].  You know, I'm bringing in people like you, and the reason why you're going to be the first guest on this podcast is because you're somebody who has played by your rules and you have very clearly worked to achieve your own definition of success, which the evidence abound in this interview, I think. I'd like for people to see, through you, parallels in their own life. Not for them to do the same thing that you're doing, but for them to give themselves permission to listen to whatever contrarian voice might be in their head or whatever new way they might have of seeing something, and to give themselves permission to go forth with it.

Jason Fried 71:22 If that's the sort of the goal of the show, I think the most important thing - and it took me a while to realize this in my own life - is just to be completely true to your self and recognize  that you've got to get to know who you are and then you've got to just live that life. I don't mean give up. That's not what I mean by, "Just live that life," but what I do mean is that if you believe in doing things your way and it doesn't compute with the rest of the world, do things your way, because you know yourself and that's how you want to live. If you want to take a certain chance and everyone else thinks you're crazy but you believe in it, then do it. You really have to get to know yourself and answer to yourself, versus letting other people define your own limits and your borders. It's a little self-helpy, which I don't like about it, but it's really true. You've got to get to know yourself. Something I hear from people when I speak, they're like, "Oh, I want to be like you guys." I'm like, "No, you don't. You want to be like you." You want to be like you, because  acting is hard. Acting makes you have to hold a bunch of things in your head about a different state of the world that is not natural to you. Once you stop acting, then everything becomes a lot easier. You may succeed and you may not, but at least you're being honest and true to yourself. That is the most important thing.

David Kadavy 72:49 I can totally relate to that because I know, sitting across from you, you're somebody who I followed online for so long, and I was always watching what you were doing, and reading what you wrote and things. Eventually I had to find my own way of doing things. I know I'm not Jason Fried. I'm not going do things the same way that Jason Fried does things.

Jason Fried 73:08 Yeah, and you shouldn't. You shouldn't. You should do things the way you do things. I think there's a lot of copying in our industry. I think there's a lot of people who try to be someone else. This is probably not even just in our-- I think this just in the world, right? I think the earlier you realize that acting and playing a part is really  hard but being yourself is really easy, then you should take the easier road. There's nothing wrong with that, and it's actually the more honest road, and I think that you'll ultimately be happier at the end of the day. So that's my advice to people.

David Kadavy 73:43 That's great parting wisdom for everybody. Thanks so much for meeting with me. It's been a huge honor, and I think it's going to be a huge help to a lot of the listeners out there. Thanks so much.

Jason Fried 73:54 Thank you. Let me say this, too. I think your show has a lot of legs, because you're a really good interviewer, and you have really good, deep questions and original questions. So I'm really excited to hear all your future interviews.

David Kadavy 74:05 Hearing that from you is fantastic. Thanks so much, Jason.

Jason Fried 74:08 You bet. Thanks.

[music]

David Kadavy 74:17 So there we have it. Before I go I've got to ask, do you like books? If you do, I'd love to send you my book recommendations. About 90% of them will be nonfiction on subjects spanning from biographies to neuroscience. Just go to kadavy.net/reading/, and make sure you put one more trailing slash on the end of that URL. Sign up, and you'll get my first set of recommendations right away. You'll be supporting this show if you buy any of those books through the links in the email. This has been Love Your Work, and I'm David Kadavy. The theme music for this show is See In You, performed by the Album Leaf, courtesy of Sub Pop Records. Love Your Work is a production of Kadavy Inc.