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Podcast title Beyond the Uniform
Website URL http://beyondtheuniform.libsyn...
Description Beyond the Uniform is a show to help military veterans navigate their civilian career. Each week, I meet with different veterans to learn more about their civilian career, how they got there, and what advice they'd give to other military personnel.
Updated Wed, 24 May 2017 10:03:23 +0000
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Education
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1. Jacob Martinez
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“At that point we had about 25 employees and things seemed to be going well... and then the financial markets crashed and we went into a very deep, deep recession, right after I took over as President. So for a few years we had to weather the storm and it was a very difficult time. But I actually accredit a lot of [my success] to the military for what I was taught. So when the tough times came, I didn't start running - I just buckled down, dug my heels in and said - 'I'm smarter than this recession.'”
- Jacaob Martinez

Jacob Martinez is the President of Market Traders Institute, a trading technology and education company with over 200 employees. Jacob started out in the Army, where he served for 4.5 years in military intelligence achieving the rank of sergeant. He started out at Market Traders Institute as Vice President of Managed Accounts and has held virtually every position in the company.

Jacob has offered to connect with any veterans interested in speaking further. He is also offering a discount on his company's Forex training platform for any veteran. This is a great chance to investigate investing as a potential career, as well as learn a new skill set. You can contact him at jacob [at] markettraders.com

 

The top 2 reasons to listen to this episode is:

Extreme Growth - Jacob took over his family's business and grew them from 8 employees to 200 employees, with a 1,200%+ growth in revenue, attaining Inc Magazine's #592 fastest growing companies in America... it's pretty impressive! Continuous Learning - rather than use his GI Bill for college, Jacob got out of his comfort zone and started growing his company. He is more committed to continuous learning than anyone I have met to date, and is constantly reading new books, attending new conferences, and seeking other ways to learn from others as quickly as possible. I find this inspiring, and his recommendations for resources are the best I've had on the show to date. Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Resources Books John Maxwell - teaches leadership. There's never a time when you will have too many leaders. Staying focused on developing your leadership will create opportunities Leadership Gold: Lessons I've Learned from a Lifetime of Leading The 360 Degree Leader: Developing Your Influence from Anywhere in the Organization The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership: Follow Them and People Will Follow You (10th Anniversary Edition) Who Moved My Cheese?: An Amazing Way to Deal with Change in Your Work and in Your Life - Jacob has read this book 10-12 times over his career. It talks about change and adapting to change. Danger in the Comfort Zone: From Boardroom to Mailroom -- How to Break the Entitlement Habit That's Killing American Business - currently reading as part of book club, the danger of entitlement and living in the comfort zone Conferences Tony Robbins - Business Mastery. this is pricey but the knowledge gained Steven Covey - 7 habits of highly effective people Training Sales - only way to grow business is to grow revenue. Only way to grow revenue is grow your knowledge Cardone University Karis school of negotiation Fred Pryor seminars - 4-6 hour classes at local hotels or online, very good for constant development Vistage - he meets with executives monthly to discuss areas of growth, culture and challenges of an executive Market Traders Institute - If you're wanting to trade forex, you need trading programs. They have forex foundation courses Show Notes

Note: I've typed these notes during my interview with Jacob, so they may not completely represent his words, and may contain spelling and grammar errors. My intention is to provide veterans with a quick reference to see the gist of our conversation, along with timestamps to hear Jacob's actual advice in his own words within the interview.

4:06 - Jacob's background 5:04 - How Jacob would explain what he does for a living Investor education and trading Teach people how to trade in the Forex market, exchanging money. When deployed, Jacob would stop in Germany before Afghanistan and would check the exchange rate. When he would stop there on the way back, the dollar would be worth a different amount. So he helps people understand and take advantage of this Their in the business of changing people's lives through empowerment. His goal is to empower people - teach them to fish - and grow their financial income Only about 30% of investors make money... their clients see about 57% of people making money 7:56 - Jacob's Growth & history getting there His father started the company in 1994 and ran it until 2004 He grew it to 8 employees during that time and it supported his family When Jacob left the military he joined the team of 8 people and took what he learned in the military - process & structure - and instilled it in the company Within a few years did every position to understand the company and put structures in place and grew the company to 25 employees In 2007 became President and things were going well... until the financial market collapse right after took over President. But his experience in the military in these tough times 2008-2011 there was no growth - just a fight for survival. But at the end of 2011 had figured things out. Since 2011 grown 1250% in revenue, 25 to 200 employees, listed on Inc 5k #592 fastest growing companies in America. He's also been committed to growth and listed top 10 places to work in Florida He talks about constantly having to reinvent yourself as a company - what challenges you see at 25 employees is different than 100 employees What was important to us and what we tracked a year ago isn't important today. And what we're monitoring today won't be important in the future. And what makes the difference is constant growth - grow or die. Not revenue but growing yourself personally. 15:10 - Resources The key to his success has been the commitment to growth and learning Success is a journey, not a destination - this qoute really shaped his look towards education You will never reach "success" - it is constant evolution and growth - it's the only way to push the journey forward We don't want to be first but we don't want to be third. There are a lot of successful business in this world. Go get a mentor and learn from successful people Jacob doesn't have a college degree... but he reads a book a month. He read a study saying the Average American reads 1 book per year! If he reads one book per month, in 5 years he'll have read 60 books vs. 5! The knowledge he has acquired in this way has tremendously helped his company Books John Maxwell - teaches leadership. There's never a time when you will have too many leaders. Staying focused on developing your leadership will create opportunities Leadership Gold - The 360 degree 12 laws of leadership Who moved my cheese - Jacob has read this book 10-12 times over his career. It talks about change and adapting to change. Danger in the comfort zone - currently reading as part of book club, the danger of entitlement and living in the comfort zone Conferences - anything, industyr conference or leadership conference Tony Robbins - Business Mastery. this is pricey but the knowledge gained Industry-focused Steven Covey - 7 habits of highly effective people Training Sales - only way to grow business is to grow revenue. Only way to grow revenue is grow your knowledge Cardone University Caris school of negotiation Fred Pryor seminars - 4-6 hour classes at local hotels or online, very good for constant development Vistage - he meets with executives monthly to discuss areas of growth, culture and challenges of an executive If you're wanting to trade forex, you need trading programs. They have forex foundation courses 24:28 - The Book Club Jacob has several of these at his company now. It started with his father, who would shut down the company for a few hours and discuss a few chapters of a book they were reading at the time Before this he had only read a few books, and this catapulted his reading It has helped his personal income and the business - continuously growing things They accicdentally stopped this during the recession and realized the dramatic impact this had on their growth. How can you change if you're not learning? He leads a book club every week - as an executive team they discuss the chapter they read. He asks his managers to hold their own book club pertaining to leadership or a technical skill in their department Unless you highly recommend this, life will get in the way. We judge others by their actions and ourselves by our intentions. But an outsider looking in is actions... they speak louder than words. You can't learn in the comfort zone or danger zone, but in the uncomfort zone. Skirting that line between danger and comfort. Harmony doesn't create growth - dis-harmony does. Every major breakthrough came from his team being in dis-harmony. Something wasn't going well, and they tried something new and it created a breakthrough 31:43 - A challenge Jacob has faced in growing his company He has faced MANY challenges in growing a company Many of them have been internal - struggles with how he views himself, not being able to live up to external expectations Every day he comes to work and faces challenges - he is now in the business of people and managing, so most of his challenges are people-related. At any given moment about 30% of the world is facing some sort of major personal crisis... that means 60 of his team members are facing a personal crisis (divorce, death, sick child, birth, etc). Business isn't about money it's about developing people. In the military he thought business would be cut throat - but that's not what a successful business is. It's about helping and growing people. So in this respect the challenge is an opportunity to have a positive impact. 35:22 - Maintaining emotional stability amidst the chaos of growing a company You need to keep things in perspective - 30% of the world is having a personal crisis right now He has had many challenges - 2 tours in Afghanistan, medically discharged from a shartered vertabrae. These challenges, vs business challenges, are not nearly in the same bucket. These challenges are nothing compared to what others are facing. Seeing the problem as smaller helps him get to a solution quicker. The Sky is never falling. When you take a step back and evaluate Get a mentor - get several mentors. There is no such thing as a perfect mentor. Depending on the crisis you will have a different mentor - business colleague, someone outside the business, a family member. They help you put it in perspective because they're not emotionally involved with the problem It can be VERY uncomfortable to be vulnerable around a mentor, but it will lead to growth. Maritial problems, money problems, relationship problems - when you let go of the fear, you get out of hell a lot quicker 41:22 - Creating systems in a company Success is a formula, not a fantasy. Even gut feelings are intuitions that you prove with a process or strarety to see if it's valid Nearly everythign at MTI is run through a process: even the amount of money they spend. Spending $X for marketing to get Y leads that dictates the # of sales people they have to the # of clients they bring onboard, and that determines the number of customer support which determines the amount of product developers... everything is connected In the military, Jacob saw that everything was a system. He was in a company of people who were virtually identical, with very similar skill sets. This didn't happen by chance - it was a process the military created. If you continue to refine a process you'll get the same results Business isn't a massive feeling of how you feel today. If you have a process and are dedicated to a process you are constantly refining and iterating, you realize that the business starts to operate at high efficiency. It doesn't matter how you feel today - it matters how you adhere to the formula. Of course emotions matter, but structure helps a company grow Don't be so married to the process that you're blindly married to it - be committed to improving ti and 46:31 - Advice for aspiring entrepreneurs If you're on active duty and thinking of transitioning, know that it's an emotional experience: exciting, fearful, and sad. Jacob wasn't sure what to do - be an overseas contractor, use the GI bill to go back to college, or join his family business and not make much money He opted for opportunity - he could make 10X more money as a contractor... but is that sustainable income in 10-20 years. For him, it was short-term. Look for opportunity - for things outside your comfort zone. Sometimes small opportunities - like his with his family business - can become enormous. If you're already out of the military and looking to grow: companies don't always communicate what really matters. If they tell a salesperson you need to have 80 calls a day to have 1 sale per day... so if you make 60 calls and make 1 sale, you may feel like you weren't successful. This comes from not properly defining what really matters - what matters is changing someone's life. If you make each call with this intention, it can change things. So find out what 1-2 items REALLY matter. "Moving the rock" - what are you doing that will "move the rock" Force X Distance  = Work... what really matters is DISTANCE. It doesn't matter how much force... how far does it go Are you moving the rock? find the 1-2 things that really affect this Train yourself to separate yourself from other people. Grow your knowledge - it's not the companies responsibility to train the employee. Sometimes people will say 'if the company can't send me to a conference I won't do it' But if you take responsibility, this is what I need to grow... it changes everything. Do I need this knowledge or not? If yes - find a way to get there. This is how you separate yourself - the average person won't do this. 55:18 - Final words of wisdom Thank you for your service When I was in I thought I was just one of the bunch. But since then has realized that he has made a difference on the world. It is a real sacrifice to serve in the military... no matter what you're doing you're having an impact Idea not coupled with action is not worth the brain cell it sits on You can have the best idea, but if you don't act it doesn't matter. You're going to fail 100%. You will fail WAY more often than you succeed. there's no such thing as a true failure if you learn from it. Act on your ideas, even if they're failures - learn from them and grow from them and eventually - it just takes one good hit. It's not luck - its a culmination of all your learnings from all your

2. Jared Wymer
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“One of the first things I heard in grad school was: Get used to B's instead of A's. And I had a knee-jerk reaction to that. But you know what - I'm pretty OK with high B's now, and solving cool problems with cool people for a really cool company. So you just need to decide what trade-offs you're willing to live with in your life and divide and conquer.”
- Jared Wymer

Jared Wymer is a Program Manager for Global Talent Management at Amazon. Jared started out by enlisting in the Marine Corps, where he served for eight years in logistics, supply chain management, and intelligence, while also pursuing and receiving an undergraduate degree and MBA. Jared transitioned from the Marines into a PhD program, working concurrently in finance and as a Fellow for the Department of State. Since that time Jared started his own consulting company, Wymer & Associates, and joined Amazon. Jared is currently one year away from obtaining his PhD.

The top reasons to listen to this episode is:

Amazon - Jared talks about working at a fast-paced, top technology company like Amazon. He discusses interviewing tips and advice on finding the right job for you Improving your working habits - being in Global Talent Management, Jared has a few tips for any veteran on how to grow, improve, and stay ahead Education - Jared talks about getting a PhD while working full time, and advice on higher education. Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links Resources  Service 2 School - they were a big help in Jared finding his way to a PhD program TheGradCafe.com - it's like Reddit, where ideas / questions are voted up or down. There's feedback on program, professors, and classes Kanban Board - list of projects you will do this week, next week, tomorrow, etc. You limit the number of projects you can focus on. Trello is a great example of this. Books The Wisdom of Insecurity - Jared's big takeaway was to not get too wrapped up around material possessions but to be present in one's life. It's easy to focus on moving the ball forward at every moment, but really being present in whatever you're doing Deep Work - a great book at being more focused at work The Everything Store - a biography of Jeff Bezos and look at Amazon Show Notes 3:00 - Jared's background 3:36 - What Jared does Program Management is similar to most NCO' responsibilities - a go between for people aligned with a certain program: how you promote someone, a piece of software, event planning, etc. In general it's aligning with one of these things and bringing the user's of the product and team responsible for it, and helping it come off without a hitch. Talent Management is promotions, and what it looks like once you're hired (performance review, etc) 5:46 - Jared's road from the military to Amazon Build your network while on active duty - talk to people who leave before you do; people at universities you're thinking of applying to; people who have jobs you admire Jared didn't get into Amazon through a traditional recruiting process - it was through a friend of a friend, where he emailed his application directly to a hiring manager This is true of his first job out of the military, which was in finance Take every moment you have to think about where you might want to go (and where it is possible to go) Figure out how to talk about what you did within the military - get comfortable telling your story in a way a civilian can understand (10:30) Networking is rarely about me - it's about the person I'm speaking with and what value I can add for them 11:42 - What drew Jared to Amazon initially Right time, right place - there was an opening right at the right time Amazon has many of the positives from the military - there is a high standard for everything (it pays to be a winner) Amazon does not have much red tape - you're encouraged to run fast and people are willing to take risks on you Many Marines are offered jobs that don't take advantage of their full skill set... Amazon is the opposite of this. They understand where you've been and where you want to go. If you can prove yourself once or twice, they will make BIG bets on you It's a great example of the importance of narrative - everything they do is based on an overarching vision document. Nothing gets done without a vision document - synthesize where you want to go and how you want to get there. 15:00 - Advice on applying to Amazon The Star Interviewing method - make sure you have examples from your experience, what you did, what was the outcome, who did you do it with. You should definitely have this under your belt and know what you're doing. Amazon, similar to the military, is very serious about their leadership principles. You can research this easily online, but every interview is structured around these leadership principles Being able to talk about your resume in 2-3 different ways in this Star Format Veterans shy away from "name dropping" or referring to leadership principles directly but people love it when you do this There is a whole new veterans initiative at Amazon. You could apply at Amazon.com/jobs, but it's hard to make it through this way. But the link in the Resources section is much better 20:15 - Career Advice for veterans a few years out of active duty (how to avoid failing) People at Amazon move at the speed of Amazon, and there is a lot of ambiguity in each role The #1 best thing you can do is to - regardless of role or company - have a framework that reduces the ambiguity you're feeling. It will make you more happy & content, and will also help you move forward when you do have an ambiguous situation. An example would be 3-4 conversations where everyone is brought together, and they decide as a group which action items are dropped from the communal list, and which are given priority. A timeline is established with all major deliverables and milestones, and 5 minutes of conversation around each milestone is re-grounding everyone in where they are in the process, and what steps are involved between different parts. It leads to a lot more collaboration and identifying of potential faults 26:52 - Pursuing a PhD while working full time He started by creating a list of people who could provide honest feedback, people who could provide empathy, a career board of advisors, a list of people who are social support. Throughout the PhD process he has viewed a part-time or full-time job as a way to continue to network and have a social circle outside of the PhD process. Jared has two brothers who have done this as well; while it comes at the expense of grades and research, it adds incredible professional experiences that may outweigh these (especially applying what you learn as you learn it) 31:38 - Advice for veterans considering pursuing a PhD Service 2 School was a huge resource for Jared Grad school / PhD program are going to seem like a lot. He found so much by calling the universities he was applying to and professors he would work with... it provided incredible insight (as well as an inside track to admission) Many school website are not updated as frequently as you'd expect, so it's important to get the info first hand or from sites like TheGradCafe.com Think 2-5 steps ahead so you can stay ahead of where you want to go 35:48 - Resources 40:26 - Final Words of Wisdom A lot of time we don't talk to each other about our successes and failure, and our time in the military can feel like high school rather than getting to know people on a deeper level Talk to each other about the highs and lows. Whether it is professional or educational or otherwise In doing this you will come across people who tell you something cannot be done... be your own myth busters.  Whether this is learning a new skill, or reducing dependencies on others Veterans have a lot of qualifications and this can make things scary and ambiguous - we don't know how to tell our story or brand ourselves. get out there, talk to people, get out of your current circle to figure out what you want to do and how to talk about your past. Celebrate the small things in your life. When you're a young military member it may be about going out drinking. as you get older, intentionally celebrating the small wins - redo your resume, get into a program, meet new friends, etc - intentionally take time to reflect on the positive things in your life

3. BTU 97 Jonny Coreson UNEDITED
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This is the unedited, full interview of my conversation with Jonny Coreson. An edited, production version can be found at: http://wp.me/p7MLkR-wx

Jonny Coreson is currently on active duty in the military, and has started two different companies while on active duty. His current company - Blue Jacketeer - helps Navy Sailors prepare for their advancement exam. This is a great interview for anyone on Active Duty or recently separated who is interested in entrepreneurship.

Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links Jonny's company: https://bluejacketeer.com/ Recommended Resources Bunker in a Box - brick and mortar collaboration spaces as well as online resources with meet-ups for military aspiring entrepreneurs. Geared towards people on active duty, provides a 14-module course The $100 Startup: Reinvent the Way You Make a Living, Do What You Love, and Create a New Future Veterati - connects veterans with mentors in a desired civilian industry

4. BTU 97 Jonny Coreson
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Description:

Jonny Coreson is currently on active duty in the military, and has started two different companies while on active duty. His current company - Blue Jacketeer - helps Navy Sailors prepare for their advancement exam. This is a great interview for anyone on Active Duty or recently separated who is interested in entrepreneurship.

Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links Jonny's company: https://bluejacketeer.com/ Recommended Resources Bunker in a Box - brick and mortar collaboration spaces as well as online resources with meet-ups for military aspiring entrepreneurs. Geared towards people on active duty, provides a 14-module course The $100 Startup: Reinvent the Way You Make a Living, Do What You Love, and Create a New Future Veterati - connects veterans with mentors in a desired civilian industry

5. BTU 96 Deep Work
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In this interview, I take a look at Cal Newport's book, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World, which provides information about how to work more productively and efficiently. I've found this book to be immensely helpful in my own work life and hope that it helps you as well.

Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links Audible Trial - receive a free audio book (and support BTU) So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World Interviews referenced Cal Newport Ryan Guina Show Notes Cal Newport - #86 Secret to finding deeply fulfilling work is NOT about following your passion Instead about getting really, really good at whatever it is you do And that developing a craft - honing a specific skill set, will lead to the three ingredients of a fulfilling career, which is: Autonomy Competency Relatedness (connection to others) Deep Work Special thanks to Ryan Guina - BTU #61 - cash money life & the military wallet I’m just going to skim the surface Talk about the 3-5 tips that have been most helpful to me these last few weeks The book is FULL of other ideas - some that may resonate more for you. So check it out. Audio Book or Digital Book - do order through BTU helps offset the $120 it costs to keep this showing going every month. Full disclosure if you do a free trial of Audible, BTU makes z$15, if you buy a book through our link we get about $0.15… clearly we are crushing it financially Not really, but if you do either of those things, it means I lose less money on this show. LOVED this book HUGE impact on my productivity Very excited to share this with you and hope it helps you in whatever you’re doing Structure Background and Deep Work for context Tips Email Scheduling Daily shutdown procedure Sprints Work-centric meditations Free time Focus on Deep work What is deep work How long would it take (in months) to train a smart recent college graduate with no specialized training in my field to complete this task? If answer is less than a year… probably not incredibly deep work May keep you busy, may make you feel momentum and feel like you’re making progress Not the deeply skilled work that will set you apart and make you fulfilled Balance of Deep and Shallow Work Will always have shallow work Writers, intellectuals may be able to detach for months to focus on their work Most of us can’t do that What is important though is maintaining an awareness of when you’re doing shallow work "It’s difficult to prevent the trivial from creeping into every corner of your schedule if you don’t face, without flinching, your current balance between deep and shallow work, and then adopt the habit of pausing before action and asking, “What makes the most sense right now?” Focusing on highest leverage item "If you give your mind something meaningful to do throughout all your waking hours, you’ll end the day more fulfilled, and begin the next one more relaxed, than if you instead allow your mind to bathe for hours in semiconscious and unstructured Web surfing" Might think this would be exhausting Always pushing your mind to focus on the highest leverage & most strenuous activity "One of the chief things which my typical man has to learn is that the mental faculties are capable of a continuous hard activity; they do not tire like an arm or a leg. All they want is change—not rest, except in sleep.” If you’re like me - some of the things that typically distract Apps facebook Reddit Email I often find myself reaching for these things instincitlvely before i even realize it Effort to keep from getting bored Cal is a HUGE advocate of boredom It’s restorative It allows you mind to recoup and allows your subconscious to solve problems in the background Great idea in the shower or on a drive But these things like Facebook, email, apps - they have a way of creeping into our lives "Addictive websites of the type mentioned previously thrive in a vacuum: If you haven’t given yourself something to do in a given moment, they’ll always beckon as an appealing option." One way to help when it comes to these apps that often pose themselves as productivity boosting or necessary is a message Cal has: "These services aren’t necessarily, as advertised, the lifeblood of our modern connected world. They’re just products, developed by private companies, funded lavishly, marketed carefully, and designed ultimately to capture then sellyour personal information and attention to advertisers” Cal talk about how there is no way to increase your ability to conduct deep work unless you start to ween yourself off of these distractions And so to help with this Cal advises to really be deliberate about which tools you let into your life. Are they really helping you? "The Craftsman Approach to Tool Selection: Identify the core factors that determine success and happiness in your professional and personal life. Adopt a tool only if its positive impacts on these factors substantially outweigh its negative impacts.” EMAIL "Schedule in advance when you’ll use the Internet, and then avoid it altogether outside these times. I suggest that you keep a notepad near your computer at work. On this pad, record the next time you’re allowed to use the Internet. Until you arrive at that time, absolutely no network connectivity is allowed—no matter how tempting.” I’ve done this the last couple of weeks and been amazed Cal talks about how even looking at your email distracts you for minutes and tens of minutes afterwards this CONSTANT distraction takes a toll little of us realize in our daily work SCHEDULE Scheduling day before in 30 minute blocks Schedule work day - each line 30 min, draw line down center. Block out all activities; provide overflow time. Assign task block and to right detail what tasks. Haveoverflow time allotted for email or something else. Ok to reschedule as many times as necessary throughout day If you stumble on insight, pursue as long as necessary regardless of schedule. Point is to build habit of asking what is most important to work on Evaluate depth by # of mos it would take a college grad to learn. Assign % of time for deep work and plan accordingly SHUTDOWN Fixed schedule productivity: don't work past 5:30. Don't offer excuses when declining opportunities and don't offer consolation prizes It's essential to shutdown from work at the end of the day and give subconscious time to rejuvenate and work on problems. NO intrusion of work email or work website ready. Unaccomplished tasks will dominate attention. Daily shutdown ritual: Check email - anything urgent? Review to do list - anything urgent outstanding? (Ensuring plan in place will relax mind) Review next 3 days of calendar - anything I'm missing Set plan for tomorrow Say "shutdown complete" - give mind permission to disengage Schedule when I will be online (e.g. Every 15 min for 5 min) If I absolutely cannot work on offline activity without access to internet, impose 5 min wait and then reschedule internet time (don't do it immediately) Schedule online blocks in evening too. Need periods of boredom SPRINTS Roosevelt dash - once per week, set aside time and give self less time for deep work than you need. FORCE self to work more productively. Can expand frequency after a few weeks MEDITATION Productively meditate - 3x / week, take a walk and think about one specific problem. Keep coming back to it. Avoid distraction and beware of looping back over same points continuously. FREE TIME Need to plan free time with structured activities that exercise mind and truly rejuvenate - social networks and web shouldn't be used for decompression and will fill any time left vacant

6. BTU #95 - Andrew Watts: Navy to Full-time Author
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“I wrote two books before I decided to leave [Proctor & Gamble] and do write full-time. You've got to have a steady source of income, you've got to have savings, and you have to have a clear path to getting to profitable replacement income for where you were. There's no real get-rich-quick path to self-publishing. I definitely think you need to have a list of products that are already out there and a proven track record before you start doing it as a full-time job.”
- Andrew Watts

Andrew Watts is the author of three books, The War Planners, The War Stage (The War Planners) (Volume 2), and Pawns of the Pacific. Andrew started out at the Naval Academy in 2003 and served as a naval officer and helicopter pilot until 2013. He started his civilian career at Proctor & Gamble for nearly four years, first as an Assistant Brand Manager and then as an Initiative Operations Leader. He published his first two books while at P&G before making the transition to full-time author in 2017.

The top reason to listen to this episode is:

Operations - Andrew started his civilian career in Operations, since he had experience with Operations in the Navy... but he found out that there's considerable differences between the two. He talks about Operations at Proctor & Gamble (and in the civilian sector in general) and the differences from what one might expect coming from the military. Proctor & Gamble - P&G is a company with a fantastic reputation, and also has a reputation for loving military veterans. Andrew talks about how, after only hist first week at P&G, he started to receive recruiting calls trying to lure him away. He talks about the interview process, how to prepare, and what life at P&G was like. Side projects - Andrew wrote his first two books while working full time at P&G. For any veteran wanting to pursue their own company or idea, he has great advice about how to make progress towards that goal before jumping off into the unknown. Writing - after publishing his first two books, Andrew took the plunge to become a full-time writer. He talks about this in a way that made me realize that it's akin to running a company entirely by yourself - marketing, publishing, getting cover artwork done... and doing it entirely by yourself. For any aspiring veteran writers, it's a great look at this creative lifestyle and the world of self-publishing. Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links The Service Academy Career Conference (SACC) - Andrew credits this with helping him find his job with Proctor & Gamble Andrew's Books The War Planners The War Stage (The War Planners) (Volume 2) Books recommended on this episode Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World - I recommended this book as a great resource for any veteran about how to do deep work that will be valuable in your career rather than the superficial work that takes up time and doesn't make a difference. Author Cal Newport was on the show before, and hits it out of the park with this book. Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear - I recommended this book (GREAT on audiobook) for anyone interested in fostering their creativity as an entrepreneur, artist, or worker On Writing: 10th Anniversary Edition: A Memoir of the Craft  - Andrew recommended this book (and I wholeheartedly second it) as an incredible look at persistence in any craft, and what it takes to become a great writer Successful Self-Publishing: How to self-publish and market your book in ebook and print - Andrew recommended this book as a great primer on how to self-publish and everything you need to know. Mark Dawson - Andrew recommended this thriller writer, whoe started self-publishing 5 years ago and has since then produced over 20 books. He offers great courses about Facebook ads, email lists, how to sell books. Andrew particularly recommended his starter Course on how to self-publish Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) - this is the resource that Andrew used to self-publish his first two books Show Notes
3:18 - Andrew's background 3:54 - How Andrew would explain what he does for a living as a full-time author 4:40 - For aspiring veteran authors, how important it is to have sustainable income prior to launching a career as a full-time author 6:00 - How Andrew decided to leave the Navy 7:45 - How Andrew used the Service Academy Career Conference to find his way to P&G 9:12 - What Operations in the civilian sector and at P&G, and how it differs from Operations in the military 13:13 - How P&G boosted Andrew's credibility within the business world and lead to head hunters calling him only one week after starting there 15:36 - An overview of the hiring & interview process at P&G 18:55 - What Andrew would have done differently when negotiating his first contract at P&G 20:06 - How Andrew would explain his roles at P&G as an Assistant Brand Manager and then as an Initiative Operations Leader 24:26 - What Andrew's life looked like while working at P&G 30:24 - How Andrew was able to write two novels while working full-time at P&G, and advice to veterans seeking to start a side project while working full-time 36:42 - An overview of Andrew's work as an author and the incredible traction he's received so far 37:57 - How long it took Andrew to write his first book while working full-time, and then his second book 41:14- Advice to veterans debating between self-publishing vs. using a publisher 43:45 - When Andrew first thought of writing, and how writing on a deployment lead to his though of becoming an author 46:30 - Resources Andrew would recommend to any veteran aspiring author 48:27 - How Andrew structures his day when he has an open landscape for his own work and advice on how to stay on task

 



7. Phile McConkey
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“I was 27 years old, 150 pounds, and I hadn’t played football in five years. And I decided that I wanted to go chase this dream [of joining the NFL]. Literally, people laughed at me. They said you have absolutely no chance - the odds are astronomically against you and you can’t do it.”
- Phil McConkey

Phil McConkey is the President of Academy Securities, our nation’s first and only post 9/11 military veteran and disabled veteran owned and operated investment bank and broker dealer. Phil has served in this capacity for the last 6 years. He started out at the Naval Academy, after which he served for five years as a Naval Aviator. After his military service, spent 6 years in the NFL, with the Packers, Cardinals, Chargers and the Giants - where he won the Super Bowl.

The top reason to listen to this episode is:

Resilience - Phil's first career was in the NFL, where he caught a pass for the winning team in the Super Bowl; he went on to start his own investment bank of which he is now president. He talks about being cut from the NFL multiple times and fighting his way back, about having the tenacity to pursue one's dream no matter what that is. Finance - Phil's company, Academy Securities, employs many veterans through Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links Resources Veterans on Wall Street - Veterans on Wall Street (VOWS) is an initiative dedicated to honoring former military personnel and employees currently in the National Guard and Reserve 100,000 Jobs Mission - https://www.veteranjobsmission.com/ Man in the Arena - A speech that Phil kept with him at the NFL and has encouraged him to remain resilient through all adversities Show Notes 2:35 - Phil’s background 3:40 - How Phil approached his decision to leave the military 15:10 - How Phil transitioned from the Navy to the NFL 19:45 - Phil’s advice to those pursuing professional sports or anything that seems like a farfetched dream 23:08 - How Phil started his second civilian career in the world of finance 25:52 - Phil’s advice to veterans seeking a career in finance 28:50 - Advice for veterans seeking to start their own company 37:45 - What life is like as President of Academy Securities 40:48 - Recommended resources 42:52 - What it’s like for a new veteran hire at Academy Securities 44:42 - Final words of wisdom

8. Matt Ufford
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“My job now is [compared to my time in the Marine Corps] so delightfully meaningless and inconsequential that the only way that I an look at sports and covering sports is that it is the silliest, most fun thing. It allows me, after the ultimate seriousness of combat in the Marine Corps, to laugh at anything, no matter how seemingly serious it is.”
- Matt Ufford

Matt Ufford is an Editor-at-Large and Video Host at SB Nation - a digital sports media brand and network of team sites built by and for the modern sports fan. He started out at Northwestern University, after which he served in the Marine Corps for four years as a Tank Officer. After the Marines he worked as a columnist at AOL Sports, as well as an editor at Uproxx Media, where he founded their sports and TV blogs.

The top reason to listen to this episode is:

Sports Writing - Matt set out to be a writer, and has worked his way up to a role where he now produced YouTube videos about sports. His story is inspiring, and is an example how through repetition and hard work, veterans can achieve any role. New Media - when Matt started out, Twitter didn't even exist. Now his role is all about YouTube. He talks about how the Sports and Media environment is rapidly changing, and what it's like to work in this constantly evolving space Perspective - I love the gratitude and perspective that Matt holds. He talks about how, compared to his military service, his job is stress free, and the gratitude he feels each day to be alive. Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links Related Episodes Cal Newport - Matt is a great example of building and using career capital. Cal talks a lot about how one can go about doing this Nate Boyer - Nate served in the NFL and Matt references Resources The Things They Carried - Book that made Matt want to write On Writing: 10th Anniversary Edition: A Memoir of the Craft A few of Matt's YouTube videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86q9Cvapczg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kfu5J8r2WoE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wPKDUxC7dCQ Show Notes 3:32 - Matt's background 4:00 - How Matt approached his decision to leave the Marine Corps 7:07 - What Matt does right now at SB Nation 8:25 - What Matt's day-to-day life looks like covering sports at SB Nation 10:23 - How Matt brings his videos to life on YouTube 17:34 - Matt's journey from the Marine Corps to a career in sports media 22:42 - How Matt started his own blog, which lead to his current career 27:54 - Recommended resources 33:42 - Final words of wisdom

9. BTU #92 - Justine Evirs: Service to School and 6+ years helping vets with education
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“Navigating my way through school as a first generation college student, I made a lot of mistakes. I could have done things a lot differently if I’d had mentorship or guidance on how to make decisions. I believe that I went through that and found myself within the military higher education space over six years ago, really just wanting to be what I needed when I got out.”
- Justine Evirs

Justine is the Senior Director of Programs at Service to School. She is a Navy veteran and Navy spouse, and has helped countless veterans find and be accepted to their ideal college and grad school programs. She started out as a Fireman in the US Navy, and has dedicated the last 6 years to transforming our active duty, military spouse, and veteran community through academic advising & program development. She has worked at ECPI University, the University of Maryland, and College of San Mateo in veteran services coordinator positions.
The top reason to listen to this episode is:

Education - Justine has spent over 6 years helping veterans find the right school (undergraduate or graduate) and program to accelerate their career. She's got extremely helpful advice about how to maximize your educational experience Entrepreneurship - Seth talks about starting a business, a brewery, and a foundation all at the same time Mentors - Seth does a great job of talking about how to find and learn from mentors as veterans pursue their civilian career Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links Related Episodes - if you liked this episode, I would recommend you check out the following episodes: Tim Hsia - Founder of Service to School David Lee - used Service to School to go from the Marines to the Stanford Graduate School of Business Alex Chivers - Army Ranger NCO to Dartmouth Service 2 School Veterati - Veterati is a free mentorship platform. Our mentors are professionals volunteering to serve those who have served our country. Student Veterans of America (SVA) - Student Veterans of America presents groundbreaking research about student veterans using the Post-9/11 GI Bill. American Corporate Partners - Founded in 2008, ACP aims to ease the transition from the military to the civilian workforce. LinkedIn - essential for networking and very underutilized by veterans Show Notes 2:39 - Justine’s background 3:47 - How Justine found herself unexpectedly facing a career transition far earlier than she expected 8:00 - Justine’s road from the Navy, through higher education, to Service to School 10:40 - Why Justine advocates education after military service instead of going directly into industry 13:50 - An overview of Service to School 21:30 - Some common mistakes that veterans make when applying to attending higher education after military service 29:20 - How to start to uncover - while on active duty - what you may want to do afterwards 35:10 - How to find the right school for you 41:45 - Advice on pursuing education after the military vs. while on active duty 46:00 - Recommended resources 48:08 - Final words of wisdom

 



10. Seth Jordan
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“I wanted to use something that I thought was special that was tied to my Marine Corps time, which is the celebratory nature of using beer as a way to give back. And I'm proud to say that this grew into a movement, and we're excited about the work that we do."
– Seth Jordan

Seth Jordan is the Founder & President of Dog Tag Brewing, a brewery that provides the highest quality crafted beers that deliver a message of gratitude for the selfless sacrifice of our nation’s military. Proceeds from Dog Tag Brewing sales are donated to causes determined by the families of fallen warriors.

He graduated from Clemson University in South Carolina and went to work for ESPN in New York City, but felt compelled to serve after 9/11. He served as an officer in the Marine Corps for nearly 10 years as a Naval Aviator and UH-1 Helicopter pilot with over 250 combat missions. He started Dog Tag Brewing after leaving the Marine Corps.

The top reason to listen to this episode is:

Support - Seth established a Brewery where all of the profits go to supporting veteran families and the causes they believe in. It's a great example of using one's career for a purpose greater than oneself Entrepreneurship - Seth talks about starting a business, a brewery, and a foundation all at the same time Mentors - Seth does a great job of talking about how to find and learn from mentors as veterans pursue their civilian career Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links Related Episodes - if you liked this episode, I would recommend you check out the following episodes: BTU 60 - Matt Miller - Vending machine; helping family and building own life BTU 71 - Jeff Tiegs - Guardian Group - giving back BTU 38 - Chris Shaw - Good overview of Bunker Labs Recommended Resources Rocket Fuel: The One Essential Combination That Will Get You More of What You Want from Your Business - The difference between innovators and executors. Division of labor, who does what and when. Battle Rhymths and how to get through things. LinkedIn - using LinkedIn requests instead of Facebook friends, connecting with new people and following up on those connections Bunker Labs - used own experiences as entrepreneurs to help veterans. Great place to test business plan and pitch deck, and learn from others. Dogtagbrewing.org - foundation doing work for the families of the fallen who have largely been neglected Video overview about Dog Tag Brewing Show Notes 3:45 - Seth's Background 4:30 - Seth's decision to join the Military from the civilian sector 5:22 - Seth's decision to leave the Marine Corps 6:28 - When Seth first started to think about starting his own brewery 8:04 - Seth's decision to donate all profits he makes to help veteran causes 12:27 - What it was like to start a brewery and advice to other veterans seeking to start their own company 16:52 - Advice for veterans seeking a mentor - how to find them and evaluate when to bring them on in a more formal capacity 22:00 - How often Seth meets with this mentors and advisors 24:16 - What Seth's day-to-day life looks like 27:16 - Advice on finding work-life balance 31:24 - The most valuable skill Seth took away from the Marine Corps that has helped him at Dog Tag Brewing 32:12 - One skill that Seth had to develop since leaving the Marine Corps 33:50 - What advice Seth would have given to himself when he first left the Marine Corps 39:37 - Resources Seth recommends to all veterans 44:00 - Final words of wisdom 47:50 - Where you can find out more about Dog Tag Brewing and how you can support Seth and his mission

11. Dan Piontkowski
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“Not every conversation that you have should up with a hiring "yes or no" decision at the end of it. You've got to spend some time going out there and finding what's out there. The right job is out there for everybody. It's a matter of us finding it."
– Dan Piontkowski

Dan is the Manager of Sourcing for all the hourly roles at Marriott in the US. He has worked in a variety of recruiting capacities at Amazon, KPMG, Hewlett-Packard, and Booz Allen Hamilton to include leading and launching many of the veteran recruiting pipelines and initiatives. Dan started out as a Corporal in the Marine Corps, before going to the Naval Academy and then serving as a Surface Warfare Officer. His last tour in the Navy was as an Officer Programs Recruiter stationed at Penn State that got him hooked on recruiting.

The top reason to listen to this episode is:

Job Search - Dan has worked with some of the best companies in the world, and has some great advice on common pitfalls veterans can avoid in their job search and interview process LinkedIn Advice - Dan leverages LinkedIn quite a bit in his job, and has some tactical advice for how veterans can best utilize LinkedIn in advancing their civilian career Recruiting - for veterans interested in Recruiting as a possible career, Dan provides an overview of what this job looks like. He also talks about how his involvement in recruiting within the military helped prepare him for and inform his decision to pursue this as a civilian.  Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links Related podcasts Liz McLean - Dan got her her first job, and she provides another great perspective on recruiting Sam Bond - I reference how Sam found his job at Lyft through staying in touch with his network in an authentic way Networking is a Contact Sport: How Staying Connected and Serving Others Will Help You Grow Your Business, Expand Your Influence -- or Even Land Your Next Job The 5 Love Languages: The Secret to Love that Lasts - recognizing how people you work with like to be acknowledged as a means of building allies and strengthening your network The LinkedIn Group, The Veteran's Mentor Network, Dan talks about being the most active group on LinkedIn Show Notes 2:07 - Dan's background 2:44 - Dan's decision to leave the military and how he approached this decision 3:48 - Dan's first job search and what he learned from this 8:20 - Based on Dan's experience and having worked with many different veterans, some common mistakes he sees veterans make in their job search 20:35 - What Dan does as a recruiter, and what his job looks like on a typical day 26:40 - Advice for how veterans can best utilize LinkedIn 31:14 - Other resources Dan would recommend for veterans 34:27 - One piece of advice Dan would give to someone on Active Duty on how to prepare for their career transition 38:43 - Final words of wisdom

12. BTU #88 - Mike Benedosso - Army Boxing National Champion to LinkedIn & Google
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“That self-discipline and drive, the foresight and focus on accomplishing a goal larger than yourself and more important than quenching your thirst (literally and figuratively) is what drove me to succeed in boxing and what drives me now to succeed in sales and other positions I may have in the future."
– Mike Benedesso

Mike works in New Business Development at Google as part of Google Cloud. He started out at West Point, where he was the Boxing Team Captain and a National Champion. He served in the Army for five years: first as an Executive Officer (XO) of a Military Intelligence Company and then as a Platoon Leader and Team Captain of the Army Boxing Team in the Army's World Class Athlete Program at Fort Carson, Colorado. There, he trained to earn a spot on the 2012 US Olympic Boxing team. Since leaving the Army in 2012, he has worked at Sony, LinkedIn, Google, and earned his MBA from UCLA.The top reason to listen to this episode is:

Determination - Mike didn't get into Google until his third time;  he is a case study in persistence and he talks about how boxing and the military prepared him for this. Sales & Account Management - Mike provides a great depiction of an Account Executive role, what the sales aspects of this actually look like. Mike had no experience in this role, and has a great description of what life is like and why other veterans may like this Google & LinkedIn - Mike has worked at both of these iconic companies and provides a good overview of what life is like here Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links LinkedIn Sales The Challenger Sale: Taking Control of the Customer Conversation SPIN Selling Websites TechCrunch VentureBeat Show Notes 2:16 - Mike's Background 3:00 - How Boxing helped Mike prepare for his civilian career 5:38 - When Mike decided to leave the military 7:00 - Mike's first job search 9:20 - An overview of Mike's experience at UCLA's Anderson School of Business getting his MBA 10:40 - What lead Mike to LinkedIn 13:38 - What Mike's role as an Enterprise Account Executive Role looked like 15:40 - Signs that veterans may enjoy an Account Executive Role and indications you might not enjoy it 18:34 - What led Mike to Google 20:22 - What Mike's day-to-day life looks like at Google 22:00 - Advice for veterans seeking to work at LinkedIn, Google, or a highly-desired company like them 27:00 - A mistake Mike made sense the military and what he learned from it 29:29 - What habits Mike has had to break from the military to be successful in his civilian career 31:49 - Final words of wisdom

13. BTU #86 - Joe Musselman: Navy to Founder of The Honor Foundation
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“They have no issue negotiating a Syrian and a Kurd ceasefire in the mountains, unarmed with warlords. But if you tell them - what's next for you? They don't know how to do that. Because they've been very frontside focused on the mission in front of them for the last 5, 10, 15, 20+ years. So from that moment it all began for The Honor Foundation."
– Joe Musselman

Joe Musselman is the Founder & CEO of The Honor Foundation. He started out at DePaul University. Joe enlisted in the Navy with intentions of becoming a Navy SEAL, but as he says, “God had other plans.” He sustained an injury that ultimately lead him to found The Honor Foundation. He is also the Founder of The NEXT Series and The SOF Garage.

The top reason to listen to this episode is:

Founding - how he did a simple step to help one veteran, and how that led incrementally to founding an incredible organization. Joe's story is one of obsession - of taking massive action to make a difference in the world. How to find your dream job - Joe talks about a very prescriptive process that has helped countless members of speical forces though the transition process Learning - this is a theme of Joe's story - reading everything he can each year, studying happines (in the workplace and in life), studying unhappiness, artificul intelligence, and writing a white paper at the end of the year about he's learned. Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links Books Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World - the most successful entrepreneurs are the ones who are most risk averse. It emphasizes the importance of planning in startups Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future - inspirational about starting an organization The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers - outlines what you need to do as a startup CEO Forget a Mentor, Find a Sponsor: The New Way to Fast-Track Your Career - outlines a mentorship role in a very different way Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win - 2 Navy SEALs Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies - learning about AI and how it will affect society Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration - about fostering creativity Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action Podcasts Grey matter Tim Ferris Philosophize This Show Notes 3:21 - Joe's background 3:55 - Joe's unexpected departure from the Navy and how he started The Honor Foundation 15:43 - One of Joe's biggest mistakes in starting The Honor Foundation 18:20 - What it looks like to be involved with The Honor Foundation as a participant 21:30 - Joe's advice for other veterans thinking of starting their own organization 24:45 - Common mistakes that Joe has seen veterans make in their career transition 29:55 - What Joe's day-to-day life looks like 34:30 - How Joe has used interactions with world-class thinkers, leaders and doers to catapult his own learning and The Honor Foundation's growth 36:48 - Joe's involvement with the NEXT Series and the SOF Garage 41:05 - Books, podcasts, and resources Joe would recommend to listeners 46:34 - Things that Joe had to unlearn (and has seen other veterans have to unlearn) from their military experience 50:40 - Final words of wisdom

14. BTU #89 – Drew Sanocki: Navy to bootstrapping from $0 to 7-figures in 1 year
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“I’m so passionate about entrepreneurship, I think everyone should have their own business on the side. If you’re a career person and you like your day job, I would still encourage you to start a business on the side. It’s really liberating, you learn a lot about customers and about marketing and I think the same rule applies to those who are still in the military."
– Drew Sanocki

Drew is a Founding Partner at Empire Growth Group, a hybrid consulting agency, services provider, and investment vehicle. He started out Harvard, after which he served in the Navy as an intelligence Officer for four years. After his transition from the Navy, Drew attended Stanford Business School. After a role at Commerce.TV in Business Development, Drew co-founded Design Public, an 'inventoryless' ecommerce company focused on the home furnishings market, which Drew bootstrapped from $0 to 7 figures in under one year, eventually selling the company after eight profitable years. Drew also runs the site NerdMarketing.com, where he writes about marketing automation and customer segmentation rules that have driven over $100 million in transactions in 2015.

The top reason to listen to this episode is:

Everyone is an entrepreneur - Drew's advice for veterans is very practical and tactical. He talks about how he got an MBA and took his first job to boost his confidence, but neither of these are necessary for a veteran to start their own company Lifestyle - Drew has an awesome perspective on lifestyle (and a blog post about it here). He also talks about how e-commerce is great for vets, as they can start these companies without a technical co-founder. He talks about looking at the skill set you have that people would pay for, and how to productize as much as possible Functional Skill - Drew has really grown his expertise in eCommerce of over a decade. He's a great example of one potential route for veterans, and it echoes what Steve Reinemund advised about a Hip Pocket Skill for veterans Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links Another great interviews that talk about starting a company while on active duty: http://beyondtheuniform.io/btu-20-ian-folau-tactical-advice-for-starting-a-company-even-while-on-active-duty/ Drew wrote an EXCEPTIONAL blog post that I speak about in the interview. You can read it here: http://www.nerdmarketing.com/lifestyle-goals-2017/ Drew’s site: http://www.nerdmarketing.com Drew recommends Ramitz Seffy - http://www.iwillteachyoutoberich.com/ . It’s really solid training that spans from getting started to make $1k on the side all the way to building, sourcing, and delivering your own product online Show Notes 3:55 - Drew’s background 4:55 - The point at which Drew knew he was going to leave the military and how he approached this decision 5:33 - How a lack of confidence lead Drew to graduate school, and advice he has for other vets about how to consider graduate school 7:18 - Advice for steps veterans may take while on active duty to better identify their next move 9:40 - Drew’s experience at CommerceTV in Business Development and Drew’s thoughts on gaining experience prior to starting one’s own company 12:40 - The Genesis of Drew’s company, Design Public 15:09 - One of the most difficult points of growing Design Public 19:33 - “I don’t want to be a billion dollar company, here’s what I want instead” - an exceptional article Drew wrote, and how his thoughts on running his own company has evolved over the years 23:30 - Advice for veterans of thinking of starting their own company 25:58 - Resources that Drew would recommend to aspiring veteran entrepreneurs 28:46 - What lead Drew to start NerdMarketing and what his life looks like on a day-to-day basis 32:20 - Drew’s other venture, the Empire Growth Group 33:30 - How Drew determines how and where to spend his time while he is working on multiple projects simultaneously 36:16 - How Drew has built up Career Capital around e-commerce marketing, and his advice to veterans on doing the same 41:36 - Drew’s final words of wisdom

15. BTU 86 - author Cal Newport: So Good They Can't Ignore You
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“Master something and suddenly you’re going to start noticing very compelling opportunities. Start from scratch, and it’s like you’re at the kiddie table - you’re not really going to come up with something the world cares about."
– Cal Newport

Cal Newport is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Georgetown University, who specializes in the theory of distributed algorithms. He previously earned his Ph.D. from MIT in 2009 and graduated from Dartmouth College in 2004. In addition to studying the theoretical foundations of our digital age as a professor, Cal also writes about the impact of these technologies on the world of work.He is the author of the recent book Deep Work, which I am reading next. The book we’ll discuss mostly today, So Good They Can’t Ignore You, argues that “follow your passion” is bad advice. Inc Magazine listed it as one of the best business books of the year, and Cal’s related Oped in the NYT was one of their most emailed articles for the entire site.

This is one of the MOST influential books I read in 2016, and I feel it is a message that every veteran should hear.s

Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links Cal's Book that we discuss in this interview: So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World Show Notes 2:20 - backstory on this interview and a brief background on Cal Newport 4:08 - the context around which Cal wrote So Good They Can’t Ignore You 5:38 - the central premise of So Good They Can’t Ignore Your - follow your passion is not just bad advice, it is potentially harmful advice 8:15 - how we often focus on “the match” of finding the right job places more pressure on one in their job search 12:30 - the Craftsman Mindset and how this is a more compelling approach than a Passion Mindset 17:55 - Career Capital and how veterans can think about their initial transition from the military, and every career transition thereafter 32:00 - Finding a Mission, and how operating at the cutting edge makes this more achievable 35:35 - Deliberate Practice vs. Hard Work, and how the former is essential for developing expertise 43:44 - Control, and how if it is acquired without career capital it will not be sustainable in a career

16. BTU #85 - Nicholas Karnaze: Marines to Founder of Stubble & Stache
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“It’s been amazing and often sometimes very depressing. I mean, it’s not a logical transition to go from Intelligence to Special Operations to Men’s Grooming"
– Nicholas Karnaze

Nick Karnaze is the Founder & CEO of Stubble & Stache, a new breed of skincare for men, and a company that also donates a large of profits to high impact charities helping veterans travel the road to recovery. Nicholas started out at the Naval Academy, after which he served in the Marine Corps for over 7 years as an Intelligence Officer and the Special Operations community. After the Marine Corps he served as the Co-Founder and CEO of The Stabilization Group, and then as Program Lead at Praescient Analytics.

The top reason to listen to this episode is:

Startups - Nick started hist first company directly out of the Marines, and talks about how important it is to pick the right co-founder, and have difficult conversation upfront.  And he talks about starting and growing his second company, Stubble & Stache, without any business school experience, but instead using books, free resources and programs like the Stanford Ignite program to help him scale his business For profit vs. non-profit - Stubble & Stache is a for profit venture that donates a portion of their revenue to help veterans. He talks about how he made the decision to be for profit rather than a non profit and the big difference that can make in the impact a startup has Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links Nick talks about his company's philanthropic effort to combat PTSD. A few interviews relevant to this are Tim Avery - Tim provides a TON of great resources for vets in this regard Duane France - Duane focuses on veterans mental health and provide a lot of great advice and resources Anthony Garcia - Anthony discusses his own battle with depression in a way that is very powerful David Smith - David speaks about his own experience with PTSD and struggle with suicide SBA Website - started here, and found it to be a GREAT source of information about starting your own company SCORE - provide mentorship and classes for entrepreneurs. They have offices in every major city  Books The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don't Work and What to Do About It - debunks many misconceptions about ent and also presents the hard reality of life in startups through a variety of case studies Confessions of the Pricing Man: How Price Affects Everything - people often overlook how to set prices. Stanford drove home the idea of how important pricing is, but this book really helped him understand the tactics of setting these prices Think And Grow Rich - Nick reads this book every year and loves it Podcasts How I Built This - the humble beginnings of most companies Show Notes 1:57 - Nick’s background 2:33 - Nick’s decision to leave the Army and how he approached this decision 4:33 - Starting Nick’s first company directly out of the Army 5:22 - Finding a Co-Founder, mistakes Nick made the first time he did this, and advice for veterans on finding the right co-founder 10:58 - What lead Nick to Praescient Analytics 12:48 - How the loss of one Nick’s good friends in combat lead to the genesis of Stubble & Stache 14:58 - When Stubble & Stache turned from a project into a full-time venture 17:22 - An overview of Stubble & Stache 21:02 - How long until Nick was able to pay himself a salary when starting his own company 23:18 - What the journey has been like for Nick, starting his own company 27:53 - Starting a company directly out the Army, what skills Nick would recommend to someone on active duty thinking of starting their own company 30:20 - Resources about finance and startups that Nick would recommend to other veterans 34:12 - Stanford Ignite and why this is an incredible asset for all veterans 36:33 - Having had experience with a startup before Stanford Ignite, Nick’s thoughts on how veterans can best approach and prepare for Stanford Ignite 39:05 - Advice for veterans thinking of starting their own company 44:33 - Habits that Nick had to break when he transitioned from the military to civilian life 46:50 - Nick’s final words of wisdom

17. BTU #84 - David Smith: Marine Corps infantryman to CMO of a Norwegian Startup
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“You should always apply a couple levels above where you think you fit in. I’ve never applied to a school that I actually thought I’d get into; I never applied for a job I actually thought I’d get. I managed to get all of them - it blows my mind every single time but it’s good; it’s a reality check."
– David Smith

David Smith is the Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) at Dogu, a Norwegian Business-to-Business (B2B) software company that creates unique solutions that allow businesses to visualize data and and accelerate sales. He started out in the Marine Corps as an infantry rifleman. Since the Marines he has graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, volunteered as a social entrepreneur doing humanitarian work in over 12 countries, has been part of the Stanford Ignite Veterans program, and many other diverse activities I’m sure we’ll get into during the interview.

The top reason to listen to this episode is:

Courage - David is such an awesome example of courage; the courage he showed when he moved to Norway, where he eventually joined a startup as their Chief Marketing Officer. The courage David showed in taking a year to travel to over 12 countries doing humanitarian work and also doing person development work; the courage he has to talk about his struggle with PTSD and very personal experiences he’s had with suicide; and the courage he demonstrates in constantly pushing himself to apply for things just out of his reach… and very often achieving them. I find David to be a passionate and inspiring person, and know you will too. Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links David shows a lot of courage in discussing his experience with PTSD and suicide. If this resonates with you, three other episodes to look at are: Tim Avery - Tim provides a TON of great resources for vets in this regard Duane France - Duane focuses on veterans mental health and provide a lot of great advice and resources Anthony Garcia - Anthony discusses his own battle with depression in a way that is very powerful David works at the Norwegian startup, Dogu David talks about his work with Team Rubicon and the George W. Bush Presidential Center.  David started his career at Andrews International in security, before going on to Berkeley David talks about doing each assignment to 100% of your ability, and we discuss my conversation with former PepsiCo CEO Steve Reinemund as a great example of this A book we discuss as focusing on doing 100% of your capabilities in your work So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love Entrepreneur Resources LinkedIn - great way to connect with the veteran community Stanford Ignite Veterans program VetTechTrek - gets good exposure to tech companies Entrepreneur Bootcamp for Veterans (EBV) - an awesome weeklong immersive program for entrepreneurship Bunker Labs - startup incubator for veterans Show Notes 1:52 - David’s background 2:30 - David’s decision to leave the Marines Corps and how he approached this decision 3:40 - David’s first job search and what led him to Andrew’s International 4:29 - David’s experience at Berkeley and his advice for veterans considering education after their military service 11:50 - David’s work with Team Rubicon and the George W. Bush Presidential Center 15:12 - International work, touring the world, and David’s work prior to joining Dogu 20:58 - How David moved to Norway after one year of humanitarian work 23:33 - How David found his first job at Dogu when he moved to Norway 27:11 - An overview of Dogu 29:22 - An overview of David’s role as Chief Marketing Officer at a startup 32:14 - Resources that David would recommend to other veterans considering startups 36:32 - How David struggled with PTSD and thought of suicide, and what he learned from this 49:33 - David’s final words of wisdom

18. BTU #83 – Chris Dattaro: Navy to Goldman Sachs to Operations at Lyft
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“Always do the best job that you can possibly do, even if it’s not something that you want to do. And always keep relationships open."
– Chris Dattaro

Chris Dattaro is an Operations Manager at Lyft in Washington DC. He started out at the Naval Academy, after which he served as a Surface Warfare Officer for five years. After departing the Navy, Chris participated in the Goldman Sachs 3 month Veterans Integration Program, before joining FBR, an investment bank, in an Institutional Equity Sales role. He briefly worked at Trustify as the Director of Recruiting before joining Lyft. Chris is married to an active duty Lieutenant and HR Officer and he is also active in his spare time coaching veterans about their career transition to the civilian workforce and working with veteran entrepreneurs.

The top three reasons to listen to this episode are:

Goldman Sachs Veterans Integration Program - Chris started his civilian career in this 3 month program, and provides a great overview of why veterans should consider applying Startups - Chris talks about using angel list and other tools to find the right startup for you Career Advice - Chris has mentored hundreds of veterans, and I really, really liked the advice he gives throughout our conversation. Things like recognizing how priorities change throughout your life, so there is no single dream job - it changes over time. And how many times our military experiences is a series of sprints from one 2-3 year assignment to another, which is in contrast to the marathon of a civilian career. He’s got some incredible advice any vet would benefit from hearing. Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links Another interview about Lyft is my conversation with Sam Bond, who is a GM at the Atlanta Lyft office Angel List - linkedIn for Tech Startups. Chris recommended this as a great resource to find startups to work at Book Recommendations About 20 minutes in, Chris has a great phrase about doing your best at every single assignment you're given, and I couldn't agree more. This is a great book that delves more into that - it's one of the best books I've read in the last three years: So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love In Transition: From the Harvard Business School Club of New York's Career Management Seminar - Chris always recommends this to veterans. It's an Harvard Business Review book, and talks about finding a job that you will find fulfilling. Vet Tech Trek - if you're interested in tech, Chris highly recommends this to veterans Show Notes 1:51 - Chris’ background 2:37 - How Chris’ decided to leave the military 3:25 - Chris’ first job search and what drew him to the Goldman Sachs Veterans Integration Program 4:36 - An overview of the Goldman Sachs Veterans Integration Program and advice for veterans considering applying to it 6:18 - The types of work Chris did as part of the Goldman Sachs Veterans Integration Program 7:06 - What lead Chris to FBR, and overview of FBR 9:08 - Chris’ first role in Institutional Equity Sales 13:28 - What brought Chris to Trustify and what this experience was like 15:18 - How Chris found the opportunity at Lyft 19:12 - What it’s like to be part of an extremely high growth company, and an overview of the Operations Manager role 21:25 - Chris’ advice for veterans seeking to work at Lyft or a technology company similar to Lyft 23:35 - Some common mistakes that veterans make, based on Chris’ work helping hundreds of veterans in their career development 33:35 - Resources that Chris would recommend to other veterans 36:00 - Habits that Chris needed to break in order to be successful in his civilian career 40:00 - A failure that Chris faced in his civilian career and how he learned from it 47:37 - Final words of wisdom

19. BTU #81 - Doug Nordman: Submarines to Financial Independence at 40
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“In the 14 years of financial independence that I've enjoyed since retirement, I've found that you can relax, you can figure out what's really important to you and you can focus on that. And so I do maybe look mellow and free and easy and having a good lifestyle, and some of that is because I've been able to do whatever I want all day for the last 14 years or so. But it also means that you get to design the type of lifestyle that you want, and you really are responsible for your own entertainment."
– Doug Norman

Doug Nordman is an early retiree, who has found financial independence far before he thought it possible. He is the author of The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement - a book where all royalties are donated to military charities. He started out at the Naval Academy, after which he served on submarines for 20 years. Since retiring from the Navy, Doug has worked to help other veterans reach financial independence, for free. Doug's spouse is a Navy Reserve retiree, and his daughter is about to start her 2nd Surface Warfare Officer junior officer sea tour on the USS GERALD R FORD. He holds a Masters in Engineering Science/Computers/Weapons Engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School.

This is one of those rare interviews I do that I would recommend to every single listener - whether you're on active duty or have been out for twenty years, this is an episode for you. The top two reasons to listen to this episode are:

Financial Freedom - Doug retired from the military just after he was forty years old and hasn't worked since then. At first, he and his wife didn't even realize they had achieved financial independence. Since he retired, Doug has helped countless others achieve financial independence, and he talks about it in a very open and transparent way that I know you'll find achievable and accessible. Tactics - Doug talks about "the fog of work" and how easy it us for each of us to get caught up in to do lists and the daily grind. He talks about taking time away from work to gather ones bearings, but also how you can use 20 minutes a day to get perspective and move towards your goals.

Sponsor:

Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links Doug's book, where 100% or royalties go towards charity: The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement Doug's website about financial independence: http://the-military-guide.com A podcast where Doug discusses writing, blogging, philanthropy, and angel investing  - http://jlcollinsnh.com/2016/12/13/angel-investing-or-angel-philanthropy/ Recruiting group mentioned: The Lucas Group Book Recommendations Your money or your life - whether your spending is aligned with what you value in your life The Millionaire nextdoor Website Recommendations Early Retirement - Doug found a lot of great and helpful information here The Military Guide - Doug's website where he writes daily and answers every user question FinCon - a network of bloggers for people who want to write, or teach financial independence Show Notes 2:02 - Doug's background as an early retiree 2:52 - At what point Doug knew he was going to leave the military and how he approached this decision 3:31 - Doug was slow to realize that he and his wife had achieved financial independence. Doug shares actual numbers about what financial independence looks like 6:02 - The 4% withdrawal rate, and why this is critical for financial independence 10:00 - How retiring in the military is a choice... it's not crucial for financial independence. But if you're enjoying it, it's a great option 11:40 - How Doug chose a life pursuing what energizes him, rather than letting a single number - salary - define his life 13:45 - A look at Doug's life, where he is able to pursue whatever fulfills him and makes him happy 16:25 - How completely attainable financial independence is, and how it is something anyone could achieve. It centers around mental shifts rather than monumental changes in your lifestyle 18:26 - Chronic fatigue and "The Fog of Work" and how it can hinder us from reaching fulfillment. We can get caught up racing from one thing to the next, without thinking about what we really want, or what our ultimate destination is 24:37 - Doug's book and website about financial independence, and what started this path 28:00 - What guided Doug to donate 100% of the royalties he receives from his book, and why this was an enormous advantage in the writing process 32:00 - Other resources Doug would recommend to listeners 34:27 - A few of the most common questions Doug has seen over his last 14 years of financial independence 39:23 - Doug's advice for those on active duty who will transition under ten years of service 43:55 - Doug's advice for those on active duty who are past ten years of service or plan to get out after at least ten years of service 46:09 - Final words of wisdom

20. BTU #88 - Zach & Drew - two Navy vets team up to raise $13M for Rhumbix
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Zach: "And so the two of us grabbed beers down in Santiago when we were both overlapping there, and started talking about this same problem. And about three months later we had officially decided to co-found Rhumbix together."
Drew: "My favorite part of that three months later story was that you look at three or four months of being in and around the idea and getting comfortable with it. But then it really took a leap of faith. And the moment for us was we actually did a whiskey tasting in Alameda at St. George's Spirits. And after a great tour and continuing to talk about Rhumbix, we were sipping some whiskey and looked at each other in the eye and said, 'let's do this.'"
– Zach Scheel & Drew DeWalt

Rhumbix is based in San Francisco and is a mobile platform designed for the construction craft workforce. They were founded in 2014 and have raised over $13M in funding from investors including Greylock Partners, Brick & Mortar Ventures, Spectrum 28, and Glynn Capital.

Zach Scheel is the Co-Founder & CEO of Rhumbix. He started out at Duke, after which he served in the Navy for five years as part of the Civil Engineer Corps. After the Navy, he attended Stanford Business School, where he earned an MBA and a MS in Renewable Energy. After Stanford he started Rhumbix.

Drew DeWalt is the Co-Founder & COO of Rhumbix. He started out at Notre Dame, after which he served for over six years as a Submarine Officer. After the Navy he attended the Stanford Graduate School of Business, earning his MBA and his Masters in Public Policy, a 3-year process. After Stanford he started Rhumbix.

The top 2 reasons to listen to this episode are:

Co-Founder: if you’re thinking of starting your own company, one of the first things you’ll need to decide on is whether to go solo or with co-founders. And if you get this wrong, it’s the fastest way to destroy your company. Zach and Drew are both Navy vets who co-founded a successful SV startup, and talk about how they vetted each other and focused on difficult questions up front to make sure they would have a lasting working relationship. Tactics: Zach & Drew have a wealth of advice on everything from running a company, maximizing your efficiency through scheduling, managing work life balance for the long haul, and committing to continued personal growth as your company grows. Our Sponsor: Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Selected Links Drew & Zach's company, Rhumbix A 2015 TechCrunch article detailing Rhumbix and their ambitions An Huffington Post article on Rhumbix A NYT Article on Rhumbix Resourceste Veteran specific : TechStars, Patriot Bootcamp, Bunker Labs - each of these provides immediate access to a network, so they are ideal starting places for most veterans First Round Review - daily newsletter that has great content on startup Tomasz Tunguz- daily blogpost that has a lot of great info from VC perspective around enterprise Saas Greylock Partners posts  Books The Lean Startup: How Today's Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers Podcasts: A16Z Show Notes 2:14 - Zach and Drew's backgrounds 3:43 - How Zach and Drew each decided to leave the Navy and how they decided on Business School after they left 5:33 - Advice for veterans thinking about applying to business school (or Stanford in particular) 7:12 - The genesis of Rhumbix 10:05 - Advice on finding - and vetting - the ideal co-founder 13:05 - How they thought about pairing with someone with a similar background, given that they both had served in the Navy 14:55 - An overview of Rhumbix 15:45 - How Zach and Drew decided who would be CEO, and how they delineate their responsibilities 17:40 - How they think about growing together as co-founders, building on the level of trust they established early on (Zach uses a great phrase of, "you're in my swim lane") 20:30 - Advice for veterans about the fundraising process 23:03 - Mistakes they made along the way and what they learned from them 24:30 - Having hired so many employees, advice they have for how to evaluate if someone is a good fit for your team 27:15 - A look at the day-to-day life in an early stage startup 31:50 - Advice for veterans thinking of starting their own company 34:32 - Resources that have been helpful for Zach and Drew that they would recommend to other veterans 38:10 - Habits that they had to break in order to be successful in their civilian career 39:33 - In what ways their roles have changed since starting their company 40:46 - Final words of wisdom

21. BTU #79 - Camilla Maybee: Army Officer to Medical School at George Washington University
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“I would say that Medical Schools is probably the single most challenging work environment, period, that I've ever been a part of. It's - for the first year and a half to two years - nothing but lectures. You're literally just being talked at for hours and hours and hours. And it is an unbelievable amount of information. It's so much stuff that they tell you right off the bat that you're never going to know everything, because that's just impossible - you're never going to know everything."
– Camilla Maybee

Camilla Maybee is currently in her second year of Medical School at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. She started out at West Point, after which she served as a Medical Supply Officer in the Army for four years. After separation from the Army, she worked at the UVA Health System as Administrative Assistant. She holds a Masters of Science in Health Care Administration from the University of Maryland.

The top 2 reasons to listen to this episode are:

Determination - Camilla is a case study in resolve. Her military career didn’t pan out as expected - she had an unexpected medical discharge. But that didn’t stop her. She wanted to go to Medical School, but was an English Major with no med school prerequisites - that didn’t stop her either. I found her tenacity inspiring. Med School - Camilla went from an unexpected medical discharge to being accepted into what US News reports is one of the top 10 most competitive medical schools in the country. Camilla is very transparent about the mistakes she made in this process, and how other veterans can learn from her mistakes in their medical school process. She is attending Med School on an 100% scholarship - that is a $250k program, for free. And she started out when she was 28 years old, while the overwhelming majority of her classmates were just 23. If you’re interested in Med School or the Health Services industry, this episode is for you. Our Sponsor

Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books

Selected Links George Washington University Medical School named one of the top 10 most competitive medical schools in the United States Camilla is on a full scholarship to Medical School through the National Health Service Corps scholarship program Most doc prepatory programs MCAT Preperatory Courses recommended: Kaplan MCAT Prep Princeton Review MCAT Prep Camilla highly recommends doing a program with a virtual or real person to explain things and coach you through the process Show Notes 2:29 - Camilla's background 2:58 - How Camilla found herself unexpectedly leaving the Army much earlier than she expected and how that affected her initial job search 4:50 - At what point Camilla realized she wanted to be a doctor  7:10 - How Camilla went to Goucher College to study pre-medicine as a "delightful accident" 12:17 - Camilla was very proactive in volunteer work; a look at what she learned and how it prepared her for Medical School 14:39 - A look at the Medical School application process and advice to veterans considering this route 17:44 - Camilla's advice for veterans about how to prepare for the MCAT exam 19:21 - Resources that Camilla would recommend to veterans to prepare for the MCAT and Medical School in general 21:13 - Camilla is on a full scholarship to Medical School; she shares more about how she found this scholarship program 25:23 - How Camilla and her husband negotiate where they will work, given the rigidity of placements after Medical School 28:56 - What day-to-day life looks like for Camilla at Medical School 33:02 - What the hours look like for Camilla 38:28 - What it's like being at Medical School, where most people are 23 (while Camilla started at age 28) 44:05 - What the road ahead looks like for Camilla 46:40 - Camilla's final words of wisdom

22. BTU #78 - Josh Carter: TechStars, Operation Code, Patriot Bootcamp and more
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“ Stop worrying about the beta, and just get the product out. If you are not embarrased by your first product, then you're doing it wrong. It should be ugly, it should be clunky, it should be what you think it should be... but less. And once you get it in the hands of the customer, the customer is going to tell you what they like and what they don't like. And that's what we realized - we were trying to be perfectionists. You want your product to be perfect, but you make these assumptions that it's going to be valuable. And the best way to do that is get it in the hands of the customer who will tell you if they find value in it."
– Josh Carter

Josh Carter is the Co-Founder & CEO of Brightwork, a microservices platform that enables developers to build faster on a reliable and scalable solution. Since their founding they’ve raised over $300K in funding and have gone through Techstars in Chicago. Josh started out in the Navy, where he served for about 3 years. Since his time in the Navy he’s held multiple engineering roles in the Telecom industry and eventually a Senior Support Engineer at the startup, Twilio, a communication startup that went public earlier this year. Josh founded his own digital marketing agency - Plunk - and is also a former founding board member of Operation Code.

The top reason to listen to today’s show is:

Support - Josh has been living in the startup world for a while, and has a great overview of different resources available for other veteran entrepreneurs. In particular, he talks about TechStars, and gives a fantastic overview of this 3 month program, as well as Patriot Bootcamp and other great resources.
In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including: Selected Links Twilio Brightwork.io Plunk TechStars - this was a great help for Josh in starting a venture backed company. It is a 3-month program offered all over the United States. They take 6% of the company in exchange for $120,000 in funding. FounderCon - all TechStar founders get together for one year Patriot Bootcamp - offshoot of the TechStars core program. It's a one weekend program that is very intense, but very targeted in preparing veterans for entrepreneurship Operation Code - Chris was a founding board member; they help transitioning veterans get into coding - finding mentors and sharing advice for becoming a programmer Resources Meetup.com - Coffee with CoFounders - lowkey get togethers are rotating coffee shops for founders to connect with each other and talk about what they're struggling with Show Notes 1:45 - Josh's background 2:30 - When Josh knew he would leave the military and how he approached this decision 3:20 - What Josh's first job search looked like and how he found the Art Academy to be different than he expected. He talks about how he found his way to the Telecom industry 4:23 - An overview on the Telecom industry and the sorts of jobs Josh held 5:16 - An overview of Josh's work at Brightwork, as well as the engagements he held before then 7:57 - What it was like for Josh to be actively employed at Twilio while running his own digital agency 9:15 - The moment when Josh first had the idea of Brightwork 11:55 - An overview of TechStars and how Josh ended up in Chicago 15:28 - How TechStars provides an investment of $125k for 6% of the company 17:38 - An overview of Patriot Bootcamp and Josh's experience 19:46 - What Josh's founding team looks like and advice to veterans for finding initial team members 25:48 - What Josh's life looks like on a day-to-day basis as part of an early stage startup 28:50 - Josh's advice to other veterans considering starting their own company 35:10 - Other resources Josh would encourage other veterans to check out 39:32 - An overview of Operation Code and how Veterans might engage with them 41:00 - One of the biggest mistakes Josh made in his entrepreneurial journey and what he learned from it 44:00 - Josh's final words of wisdom 

23. BTU #77 - Michael Freed: 10 Years on Submarines to President at Mirion Technologies
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“I started to try and reverse what I had been doing already, which was complaining with everyone else. And I started to notice that I was able to develop a presence, because I had been there before. That case team might as well have been trying to fix some pump in the engineroom on a submarine on mission. People were frustrated that they were there and that things weren't going the way that they wanted. That lesson I think helped me get promoted faster at Bain, because I started to lead teams outside of the reporting structure. I was able to  a mature force on the team and help drive attitude before I was able to add value at a leadership level."
– Michael Freed

Mike is the President of the Health Physics Division at Mirion Technologies, a provider of radiation detection & monitoring products and services to the nuclear power, medical, military and homeland security markets. He started out at Northwestern University, after which he as an officer in the Navy for ten years, serving on submarines and on the Chief of Naval Operations personal staff. After the Navy he received his MBA from the Darden School of Business, after which he worked at Bain & Company for nearly six years as a Principal.

The top two reasons to listen to today’s show are:

Consulting - Mike spent six years in consulting with Bain & Company and has mentored many veterans who have worked in consulting. He’s got great advice on managing one’s career, a typical career progression within Bain, mistakes that he made, and more. leadership - Mike talks about how w/in consulting, veterans are often frustrated that they start out as an individual contributor rather than a manager, which more closely matches their previous military experience. He talks about how you have the ability ability to lead - in any organization - no matter what your role is, and has a lot of great insights on taking care of your team, challenging your people, and utilizing your best leadership skills from the military in your civilian career.
Our Sponsor

Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books 

Selected Links Mike's current company is Mirion Technologies Mike worked at Bain & Company as a Management Consultant, and highly recommends Bain as a great company for veterans Tim Ferriss' podcast - this is actually the show that I based Beyond the Uniform on; each week Tim meets with top experts to "deconstruct" what has made them succeed The Wall Street Journal - Mike reads the front page every day to stay abreast of the latest events Utility Dive - a summary of the utility space where you can pick and choose your articles to stay on top of the latest in this industry Show Notes 2:30 - Mike's Background 3:11 - The point at which Mike knew he was going to leave submarines and the Navy and how he approached this decision 4:33 - How Mike chose business school over going directly into industry and advice for veterans struggling with this decision 5:41 - What lead Mike to Bain & Company and the world of consulting 7:43 - What sorts of projects Mike worked on while he was at Bain & Company  10:03 - How the frequency of movement within consulting companies keeps you constantly learning and growing 11:45 - Mike's career progression within Bain & Company, and how both his titles and day-to-day work shifted with each progression 15:08 - For a veteran starting a career in consulting, how to best utilize the first 90 days of their job 19:55 - A mistake Mike made while at Bain & Company and what he learned from it 23:10 - What brought Mike to Mirion Technologies from Bain & Company 26:30 - An overview of Mirion Technologies 28:15 - What Mike's day-to-day life looks like for Mike as a President at Mirion Technologies 30:44 - How leadership outside of the military has differed from leadership within the military 37:18 - Resources Mike would recommend to veteran listeners 40:18 - Mike's final words of wisdom

24. BTU #84 - Nate Boyer: Army Green Beret to the NFL
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“That's the main takeaway from things for me: to not limit yourself. I never played football until I was 29 years old. I never long snapped a football until I was 31, and  I somehow had a shot in the NFL. And I'm not a good athlete; I'm an OK athlete - I just worked hard. And that's just one example, but we're all capable of that."
– Nate Boyer

Most recently, Nate Boyer was the long snapper for the Seattle Seahawks, but his is also an actor, public speaker and thought leader. Nate started out as a relief worker in Sudan, building camps for refugees of the War in Darfur. He then joined the Army, where he served for six years with the Green Beret as a Sergeant and earning a Bronze Star. After he transitioned from the Army, although he had never played a down of organized football in his life, he went to the University of Texas and was a walk-on to their football team. He became the team's starting long snapper, and played 38 consecutive games for the Longhorns. [He was a first-team Academic All-Big 12 Conference member in 2013-2014, while also being named an Academic All-American in 2012. After Texas, Nate played with the Seattle Seahawks as a free agent.

Oh man, where to start with this interview. If you are in need to a shot of jet fuel to your soul, you owe it to yourself to listen to this interview. I want Nate Boyer on repeat during my runs - the man is incredible, and I found our interview inspiring.

The top two reasons to listen to this episode are:

Failure - Nate has achieved the impossible - repeatedly in his life. He talks about being a grinder, of just working hard to go after his dreams. And he talks about how it's not about not having fear - it's about having the courage to realize that there is no downside, that the only risk is not taking an opportunity. There are far too many incredible words of wisdom to summarize here, but believe me - it's a lesson every single veteran will benefit from hearing. Passion - Nate talks about how many veterans fall back on what you know. He talks about how tried many things - and failed at many things - in his journey to find his calling and what he enjoys most. Again, these are lessons I found inspiring and hope you do too.

Selected Links

Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Book Recommendation: Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman Conquering Kili Waterboys.org - Nate was cut from the Seahawks and was disappointed. Literally the next day, while trying to think of his next mission, Chris Long (Rams, now NE Patriots) had started a clean water project - Waterboys.org - and reached out to Nate Merging Vets and Players - Nate co-founded this with Jay Glazer to connecting veterans with transitioning professional athletes. These groups face similar challenges - going from a position of sacrifice to a dramatic life shift, the locker room and team environment feel, fighting for the person next to you... there's a lot each side from learn from the other and share in common. Nate talks about a Shia Labeouf video that's cheesy but strangely motivational. You can check it out here. This remixed version is even better after you've watched the original Show Notes 2:09 - Nate's background in the NFL with the Seattle Seahawks. He served for six years in the Green Beret in the Army and was a walk-on at the University of Texas for their football team. 3:05 - A special disclosure for listeners about my extremely poor background with football 3:47 - How Nate has lived his life in the moment, trying new things and diving in, not being afraid of failure and knowing that you are just as qualified as everyone else out there. 12:58 - How Nate decided to join the Army after spending time volunteering in Darfur 26:14 - How Nate approaches his career now, and advice he has for veterans seeking a career that will make them passionate (hint: it's about trying new things and not being afraid of failing as you work towards what you want to do. If you don't know what you're passionate about you need to try something your'e interested in. Nate tried things he wasn't interested in, knowing he wasn't wasting time if he was exploring. If you're not afraid of what you're getting into, you probably shouldn't do it) 32:42 - What resources Nate would recommend to veterans (hint: it all boils down to being open each moment to whatever experience you have, and be open to learning from anyone) 36:31 - an overview of Waterboys.org, and how Nate came to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro as a fundraiser from a random connection the day after he was cut from the Seahawks 43:00 An overview of Nate's venture Merging Vets and Players, and how it came about. It pairs transitioning veterans with transitioning professional athletes, and you'd be surprised at much these two have in common 50: 20 Nate's final words of wisdom...surprisingly to a motivational video from Shia Labeouf, and how you can seize each moment to make the most of your life

25. BTU #75 - Ben Deda: Marines to COO of Galvanize and raising $63M in funding
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Description:

"Be willing to take a step down to take go up. As opposed to thinking, 'I'm going to burst right through this' realize sometimes you have to go down, around and then that's where you finally get the push through. Every single job I've taken, I've taken a pay cut. I made it back within three to six months, but those are the steps you have to do."
– Ben Deda

Ben Deda is the Chief Operations Officer at Galvanize, a network of modern, urban campuses where anyone can access the skills, knowledge, and network you need to make an impact. Since their founding in 2012, Galvanize has raised over $63M in funding. Ben started out at Notre Dame, after which he served in the Marines for seven years. After his transition from the Marines he worked at TruStile Doors in Operations, Marketing, and Sales, and eventually as Vice President of Commercial Sales. He then joined the computer software company, FullContact as their VP of Sales & Business Development. Ben also runs Denver Startup Week, the largest startup event in the US, and holds an MBA from the University of Denver

The top three reasons to listen to today’s show are:

Pay cut - Ben has held some incredible roles at great companies, and he talks about how - at every single step he’s taken forward in his career - it started with a pay cut. No matter what stage you’re at in your civilian career, the perspective he has on this is worth hearing. Networking - regular listeners to the show know the importance of networking. Ben not only has some great stories about this, but his current company - Galvanize - is approaching this in a new and novel way. Operations - Ben is the COO for a rapidly growing startup and this is a great story for those interested in startups, in operations, or in sales and marketing. Our Sponsor

Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books

Selected Links Ben worked with Lucas Group for his initial job search; he had a favorable experience, but emphasizes that the onus is on the veteran to ensure the opportunity is the right match for them Book Recommendations: The Lean Startup: How Today's Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses - essential reading for any aspiring entrepreneur Brad Feld was an investor at FullContact and a member of their board. Ben recommends any books by Brad, but in particular: Do More Faster: TechStars Lessons to Accelerate Your Startup Venture Deals: Be Smarter Than Your Lawyer and Venture Capitalist Startup Communities: Building an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem in Your City The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers - you may not gain hard skills but you'll understand much more about the startup life and an inspiring story Website Recommendations: Meetup.com - anything you're interested in, you'll find a group. Start going to these events and meeting people, regardless of your area of interest Tom Tunguz's blog about Software as a Service (SaaS) Saastr - a great conference around Software as a Service (SaaS) Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation - a great organization for veterans and community to network and meet interesting people Ben's company, Galvanize, is a great resource for entrepreneurs. Patriot Bootcamp Show Notes 1:46 - Ben's background 2:40 - Ben's decision to leave the Marine Corps and how he approaches this decision 4:10 - Ben's very first job search out of the Marine Corps and how he found his way to TruStile Doors 7:28 - Ben's work with recruiters and his advice for veterans about whether or not to consider using them (hint: give it a try, but the onus is on you to make sure the opportunity is right for you) 8:44 - How Ben found FullContact, his second job, and how he made the transition from TruStile Doors 9:57 - Ben left a secure job while having a pregnant wife and a lot of personal responsibilities... how he psyched himself up to make this move and take this risk 11:04 - What it was like to be the non-technical hire at FullContact and what life looked like in this capacity 12:39 - How Ben's work in recruiting in the Marine Corps has helped him in his sales and business development roles 13:53 - How Ben made the transition to Galvanize based on connections and people he knew 14:54 - An overview of Galvanize and what they do 17:25 - An overview of what Ben does as a COO, and what his day-to-day life looks like 19:15 - How leadership for Ben in the civilian sector as opposed to leadership within the military and the US Marine Corps 21:31 - One of the biggest failures Ben has experienced since leaving the Marine Corps and what he learned from it 25:28 - Advice that Ben would provide to veterans interested in starting their own company, based on his experience in startups as well as leading Denver Startup Week 27:40 - Resources that Ben would recommend to veterans interested in startups or operations 30:45 - Ben's final words of wisdom for veterans

26. BTU #73 - Sarah Travaglio: Army to Assurion, Accenture, and LinkedIn
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“It's kind of scary when you first get out, because all of a sudden everything about your career is dependent upon you. You're in the driver's seat now; you don't have HRC, the Pentagon to call to ask where you're going next. Where you're going next is where you decide to drive that car. And so, while it might seem like a lot of weight on your shoulders, and something that's a little bit scary, it's also something super exciting because it means you can take yourself wherever you'd like to go, and it's not up to anybody else."
– Sarah Travaglio

Sarah works at LinkedIn, where she is the Senior Manager, Head of Media Account Management for the Americas. She started out at West Point, after which she served in the Army for five years as a Company Commander and Assistant Battalion Operation Officer. While on active duty she obtained her Masters in Human Relations from the University of Oklahoma, and after her transition from the Army she worked at Asurion in Customer Experience positions, before moving on to Accenture. She then moved to LinkedIn, where she has worked for the last three years.

The top three reasons to listen to today’s show are:

Firecracker - Sarah is awesome; she is exceptionally efficient in her advice, the ratio of quality advice per sentence is extremely high, and I think she is spot on in her perspective on the pros & cons of recruiters, remote working, education on active duty, and more Process improvements - Sarah found her first job, which lead her to consulting and then LinkedIn. She fell in love with the field of process improvements, and it’s a great career options that other vets may want to consider. More than just an overview of the role, Sarah’s passion for it comes through loud and clear LinkedIn - Sarah works there and has great advice on how to use LinkedIn and other great resources veterans can use in their civilian career Our Sponsor

Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books

Selected Links Cameron Brooks - helped Sarah get her first job at Asurion and had a very positive experience with Cameron Brooks as she conducted her first job search. Asurion - Sarah’s first job experience; she speaks really highly of them as an organization in this interview Accenture - although Accenture is known for consulting, Sarah didn't work as a consultant with Accenture but as a Global Candidate Experience Channel Manager NPS (Net Promoter Score or Net Promoter) - a very common term in business to measure satisfaction with a company, product, service, etc. Recommended Resources veterans.linkedin.com - FREE LinkedIn resources for veterans, access to learning courses (Lynda.com), free upgrades for profile, library of resources to have access to Alumni Facebook Groups, Facebook Women's Group (West Point) LinkedIn - the most VALUABLE free resource available - your network, your profile, everything you need Show Notes 2:05 - Sarah's background at LinkedIn 2:41 - How Sarah decided to leave the Army and how she approached this decision 4:24 - Sarah obtained her master's degree while on Active Duty, and she has a lot of great advice to those on Active Duty on how to best take advantage of this 6:55 - Sarah's experience at Asurion - how she found her way there and what her experience was like 11:00 - Sarah worked with Cameron Brooks as part of her job search and she talks about what this experience was like 14:51 - What lead Sarah from Asurion to Accenture 16:50 - What Sarah's day-to-day life looked like while she was at Asurion 19:40 - Sarah describes what it's like working remotely (rather than in an office) and the pros and cons of each 21:33 - How Sarah made the transition to LinkedIn 24:47 - What Media Account Management, Sarah's role at LinkedIn, is and what life looks like in this role 27:22 - What Sarah's day-to-day life looks like at LinkedIn 31:30 - Resources that Sarah would recommend to other veterans that have helped her in her career 38:22 - Sarah's advice for how veterans can craft an effective LinkedIn profile 39:05 - One of the biggest surprises Sarah faced when she left the military 42:48 - One of the biggest mistakes that Sarah made when she left the military and what she learned from it 49:08 - Sarah's final words of wisdom

27. BTU #72 - Michael Bradley: How NUPOCC is helping veterans find their ideal job
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Description:

“Just baby step it; don't think 'Where do I need to be in 30 years,' think about 'where do I need to be in the next year or two to set myself up.'"
– Michael Bradley

Michael is the President & Owner of M3S Networking, a small business that focuses on dynamic problem-solving, particularly with startups and small businesses. He Started out at the Naval Academy, after which he served for seven years as a submarine officer. After his transition from the Navy, he spent two years working on a spy satellite job with the National Reconnaissance Office as an Acquisition/Project Officer. Michael is also the Chairman of the Navy Nuclear Power Officer Career Conference (NUPOCC), a career fair helping veterans transition from the military or find new jobs- those of you who have listened to Episode #55 with Ashley Snyder will remember this as the organization that she credited with landing a job at Google directly out of the Air Force. Finally, he's a husband, dad of 3 boys and is a credentialed baseball media member.

The top three reasons to listen to today’s show are:

Work / life balance - I don’t think this is talked about enough, but Michael does a really good job discussing how to factor this in to your career path & decision. Career fair - those of you who listened to Episode #55 with Ashley Snyder remember how she went directly from the Air Force to Google because she attended a veteran organized career fair… well Michael is the one who runs that career fair. It’s free, it helps a ton of vets… I’d go so far to say that NUPOCC is advantageous to veterans in a way that comes at Michael’s expense. Check it out - it’s really great and I know all of you listening on active duty or who have recently transitioned would benefit from it. Startups - Michael has started two different companies, and has great advice on starting small. Our Sponsor

Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books

Selected Links NUPOCC - Arlington, VA & Pearl, HI, Bremerton. Events. Google, Palantir, Facebook, Blue Origin, JP Morgan (~20 companies). Grad Schools: Harvard, Wharton, Stanford. High end candidates, high end companies and schools, high end venues. $2-3k table fee - get list of candidates & phone numbers Service academy career conference - https://sacc-jobfair.com/ Related podcasts you may enjoy Ashley Snyder - Ashley went from the Air Force directly to Google, and attributes NUPOCC for playing a big role in that transition Show Notes 1:58 - Michael's background, from the Naval Academy and Submarines into starting his own company 3:00 - Michael's experience a baseball media member; it may not generate a lot of money, but it gets him into Pittsburg Pirate games 5:29 - Michael's decision to leave the Navy and how he approached this decision 7:30 - Michael's experience in the Navy Reserves, and his advice on how to best take advantage of the IRR 10:38 - The highlights of Michael's journey from leaving submarines until today 14:00 - Michael's thoughts on work / life balance, and what advice he would give to fellow veterans 18:20 - An overview of the Navy Nuclear Propulsion Officer Career Conference (NUPOCC) 29:43 - Who can attend the NUPOCC conferences (hint: Michael will never turn a veteran away from an event, so contact him) 32:45 - A few common mistakes that Michael sees veterans make in the career transition to civilian life 41:30 - How Michael started M3S and advice he would give to other veterans seeking to work for themselves or create side income 46:00 - Michael's final words of wisdom

28. BTU #71 - Jeff Tiegs: 25 Years of Army Counter Terrorism to the Guardian Group
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Description:

“I don't think that it's easy for people to recognize what their calling is. One, you really have to listen. And sometimes you get pulled into things that you weren't ready for. My wife and I did not plan on leaving a very difficult life as a counter terrorism family to pursue... this. To dig into this really vile crime. We thought we were going to retire in the mountains, and kind of gallop off into the sunset and work leadership issues and things like that. And as I got more called to this problem set, there's a certain amount of duty and obedience you have to walk through and sometimes that can be difficult."

– Jeff Tiegs

Jeff Tiegs is a Counter Terrorism and Counter Insurgency Expert with over 25 years in US Army Special Operations. His combat experience includes operations around the globe to include multiple tours in Afghanistan and Iraq. He is applying this expertise to Counter Trafficking in the United States and is the Chief Operating Officer for Guardian Group. Guardian Group is a non-profit that works with law enforcement to illuminate, disrupt, prosecute and relentlessly pursue child predators. After his transition from the Army, he attended Breakline Education, which we talked about in Episode 54 with Bethany Coates.

The top three reasons to listen to today’s show are:

Experience - Jeff joined the Army when he was just 17 years old and served with Army Special Operations for 25 years. He’s one of the few people I’ve had on the show who transitioned into a career that puts these exact same skills to use but in the civilian sector, and it’s an incredible story. Doing Good - Jeff is one of the few people I’ve met - in my life - where it seems like he has a calling rather than a career. I’m inspired by how he followed that calling, even though it wasn’t what he thought he wanted to do after the military. He is putting his skills to use in a way that is clearly making the world a better place, and it’s really inspiring. Second revolution - Jeff talks about WW2’s impact on world and veterans lead a revolution in starting small businesses. He talks about how today is following a second trend, and I found it very energizing. HOW YOU CAN HELP

To help the Guardian Group in their fight against child predators, you can help encourage hotels to go through the Guardian Group Silver Seal program. This will help hotels recognize child trafficking activities, and is a crucial initial step in stopping this pattern. For your favorite hotel chain, you can can use the following template:

@[hotel chain] please join the @GuardianGroupGG Silver Seal program to help put an end human trafficking http://bit.ly/2icMvhc Example: @marriott please join the @GuardianGroupGG Silver Seal program to help put an end human trafficking http://bit.ly/2icMvhc Sponsor

Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books

Selected Links Related podcasts you may enjoy Bethany Coates #54 - She runs Breakline, the group that helped Jeff when he first got out of the Army. A great episode and program for all veterans to consider Emily Episode #70 - New Politics, and how it helps veterans on both sides of the aisles get into politics Michael Bradley #72 - I reference this interview; we have a good discussion about how important it is when networking to have very specific and actionable asks Book Recommendations The Art of the Start 2.0: The Time-Tested, Battle-Hardened Guide for Anyone Starting Anything - stop thinking about, stop over-organizing things and begin to act The $100 Startup: Reinvent the Way You Make a Living, Do What You Love, and Create a New Future - stop thinking about, stop over-organizing things and begin to act You can donate to the Guardian Group here You can follow the Guardian Group on Facebook here The Guardian Group Silver Seal program is ensuring hotels are trained to notice indicators of human trafficking. Provides them with a reporting system as well to notify the Guardian Group of child trafficking, and also inform legal authorities Show Notes 2:39 - Jeff's background, joining the Army at 17 and serving in counter terrorism for twenty-five years 3:35 - How Jeff decided to leave the Army after 25 years of service, and how this was a very gradual process for Jeff 5:50 - Jeff and I discuss how this is a calling - not a career - for Jeff, and he followed that calling 7:35 - What lead Jeff to Breakline and what his experience was like while there 9:35 - How Jeff was first connected to the Guardian Group and how he found his way to join them. He talks about how callings are never overnight, and that it happened after a chance encounter at a retirement ceremony that - years later - turned into a job 11:23 - Jeff provides an overview of the Guardian Group and the work that they do 14:15 - How Jeff found a very purpose-driven career after the Army, and one that utilizes his specific training from within the military. He also talks about the trend after WW2 for veterans to start companies, and how we are in a second revolution now similar to this 17:25 - Jeff and I discuss the power of passion - how mission and vision can drive us to achieve more in our civilian career 21:26 A look at what Jeff's day-to-day life looks like as COO at the Guardian Group 24:48 - How listeners can support the Guardian Group; even if you don't want to work with the Guardian Group, tactical steps you can take - today - to support their cause 29:29 - Jeff shares a short story, of Emily, and how they helped her. It's a powerful example of what the Guardian Group does 33:18 - For listeners who are interested in applying to the Guardian Group or working in this space, advice that Jeff would give 40:00 - The most challenging part of Jeff's job (hint... you've heard it before... it's about having to ask for money and fundraise for his company) 41:37 - Jeff's final words of wisdom

29. BTU #70 - Emily Cherniak: How New Politics is helping veterans of both parties run for office
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Description:

“The thing that I would say to veterans is that I know that it's scary, I know that it's not something that they maybe thinking of doing, and I know that it seems like a very weird thing to get involved in politics. But our country needs you and our democracy needs you. Regardless of what side of the aisle you're on, we need leaders who are going to put the country first, now more than ever."
– Emily Cherniak

Emily is not a veteran, as I usually have on the show, but she’s built an organization that is helping vets. So I wanted to give you a quick overview on her company - New Politics - and then a bit of background on Emily.

New Politics identifies top talent, helps them build a winning campaign infrastructure, and provides mentorship and support throughout their campaigns. New Politics supported 5 national service candidates in key state and federal races across the country. They won three of those five races, including Congressman Seth Moulton’s unprecedented win in Massachusetts’ Sixth Congressional District. In 2016, New Politics is supporting 23 candidates in local, state, and federal races across the country. They have won 17 primaries and 13 general elections.

Emily has run New Politics for the last four years. Emily has worked with AmeriCorps, City Year AmeriCorps, and part of the founding team of Be the Change--where she led a coalition of over 200 organizations to engage 250,000 people for a Day of Action in support of the $6 billion Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act of 2009. Emily graduated from George Washington University with a Bachelor's Degree in Criminal Justice and Psychology and a Masters Degree in Education Policy.

The top three reasons to listen to this episode are:

Politics - Emily is not a veteran, but she started an organization - New Politics - that is helping veterans who are interested in politics, regardless of which side of the aisle you come from. She helped out Sean Barney from Episode #66 in his congressional race, and I’m hoping she will be helping a listener to this show very soon. It’s an exceptional program, and something I believe our country greatly needs. Weaknesses - Although Emily talks about veterans in politics, everything she says parallels incredibly well to weaknesses that veterans have in business - talking about oneself, asking for help, etc. Her thoughts on this are really worthwhile. Star Wars - Emily has this epic analogy about 28 minutes in on the interview between politics and Star Wars that is simply awesome

Selected Links

Sean Barney, from Episode #65, ran in a recent Congressional race and was helped by Emily and her team. It's definitely worth checking out. City Year - $100M organization, where Emily started out AmeriCorps Candidates Journey Manual - available end of january Show Notes 1:44 - Emily and New Politics background 3:30 - An overview on New Politics and how they are helping veterans 4:36 - Emily's "Theory of Change" and how less than 18% of leaders in office have a military background, whereas this used to be over 70%. 5:50 - How Emily went about starting New Politics, and her background in politics. Her belief that politics is broken, and how vital politics is.  9:07 - Emily works on both sides of the aisle, rather than embracing one political party. Rather than finding this difficult and conflicting, she finds this invigorating. She focuses on leadership, and realizes that she disagrees with people from both parties - what they're about is trusting good leaders to make the right decisions for our country 12:10 - An overview of the process of working with New Politics 14:06 - From Emily's work with veterans, a few of the most common misconceptions she sees. A lot of veterans don't have a political party allegiance, so having conversations around why they find important is really crucial. Politics is hard in a different way, and its important for veterans to understand the daily grind of raising money and constantly promoting oneself.  18:21 - Fundraising... how this is the most dominant portion of any election, and Emily's advice on how veterans might go about this 24:03 - Emily shares a few other stories of veterans who have run for office. Often, it doesn't matter if the candidates wins - it's about gaining the experience for a career of public service. 25:30 - Indications that New Politics might be right for you... and an encouraging note to reach out if you're interested, as New Politics is willing to speak with any veteran and answer any questions they may have 26:10 - Other common weaknesses Emily sees in veterans that listeners should be aware of... and an amazing Star Wars analogy 29:42 - Emily's final words of wisdom

30. BTU #69 - Alex Martin: Marine to Global Entrepreneur
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Description:

“At this point, I don't think I really could have a boundary [between professional and personal life]. It's not about a forty-hour work week, and being able to accomplish everything in forty hours; I get that. It's about constantly thinking about the product, thinking about the customers we have and the customers we want, where we're going to go and what the next steps are. I just can't turn it off: I dream about it, I think about it every minute, and there is no separation. Maybe that's unhealthy and a bad thing, but at this point if no one is fanatically excited and obsessed with the product we're trying to create than the founders then I don't think it can work at this stage."
– Alex Martin

Alex Martin is the CEO & Co-Founder of AC Global Risk, a company that creates solutions to transform how companies & governments vet, screen and assess internal and external human-based risk. Alex started out at the Naval Academy and served in the Marine Corps for seven years as a Infantry & Ground Reconnaissance Officer. After his transition from the Marines he founded Skye Maritime - maritime security services to commercial shipping - as well as the Kenya Team Leader for the non-profit, Nuru International. Alex is currently a Major in the Marine Corps Reserves.

The top three reasons to listen to this episode are:

Service - Alex has continued to serve in the Marine Corps Reserves, he worked in Kenya with the organization Nuru helping local farmers grow their income, and his own company - AC Global Risk - has a service element as well. He’s a great role model for keeping service an active component in his life, and talks about how to serve as a for-profit venture Startups - Alex started his first company straight of the Marine Corps and it failed. He learned from it, and is on his second company, AC Global Risk. He is very honest and balanced in this interview about failure, about mistakes, and how these are essential for entrepreneurs Stanford Ignite - Alex goes in depth on the Stanford Ignite program as well as many other really valuable resources for those of you interested in startups

 

Selected Links A great article on Alex and his company: http://www.military.com/veteran-jobs/career-advice/job-hunting/from-marines-to-entrepreneur-alex-martin.html Related Podcasts Great EO Fire podcast episode that talks about the power of obsession in startups. I reference this in the interview and think it’s really relevant to entrepreneurship. Be Obsessed or Be Average, it’s that simple says Grant Cardone  Don Faul interview - referenced as a huge resource of support Show Notes 2:08 - Alex's background 2:50 - Alex's decision to transition from the Marine Corps to a civilian career 3:39 - Alex's experience being part of the Reserves and how it has impacted his civilian career 5:32 - Alex's experience as part of the Stanford Ignite program and how this impacted his entrepreneurial experience 7:49 - An overview of Stanford Ignite as a program for veterans 10:22 - Alex's experience at Nuru International 15:15 - The genesis of Alex's second company, AC Global Risk 17:40- An overview of AC Global Risk 19:21  - What Alex's day-to-day life looks like as the CEO of AC Global Risk 21:11 - Alex's lifestyle as an entrepreneur married to another entrepreneur 24:27 - How long it took Alex to be able to pay himself as salary while he was starting his own company 28:43 - Alex's biggest mistake in starting his own company and what he learned from it 33:03 - Alex's team size at AC Global Risk and what his team looks like 34:22 - Advice for any veteran thinking of starting their own company 35:36 - Resources Alex would recommend to any veteran thinking of starting their own company 37:53 - Advice for veterans seeking to raising capital for their own company, and the fundraising experience 43:40 - Habits that Alex had to break when he left the military in order to be successful in his civilian career 45:55 - Other mistakes that Alex made since departing the military and what he learned from them 48:47 - Final words of wisdom for veterans of the Armed Forces

31. BTU #68 - John Lee Dumas: Army to EOFire and over $205k a month in revenue
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 “Listen, life is a journey and all of my failures - which were plentiful before EOFire - added to the success of EOFire. They were all life lessons and all experiences I had to learn from and go through in order to launch and run a multi-million dollar a year company, which EOFire has grown into. It's just really looking at life as a marathon: you're 26 when you get out of the military, or you're 36, or you're 56 - whatever it is. You have a LOT of life left. So stop trying to rush, stop trying to sprint everywhere. Just look at life as a marathon, set your site on your goals and then just take them one step at a time."
– John Lee Dumas

John Lee Dumas is the fonder and host of EOFire, a daily podcast that interview entrepreneurs 7 days a week, where, as reported by Forbes, he has generated #2M in sales by his second year in the business. He started out at Providence College where he did Army ROTC, after which he served in the Army as an Armor Platoon Leader for eight years. After his time in the Army, John enrolled in Law School, but left after his first semester. He then worked in corporate finance at John Hancock in Boston, and later at a tech startup in New York. In 2009 he moved to San Diego to work in real estate. During his long drives, he started listening to podcasts, until he decided to start his own podcast, which launched in September of 2012. He is the author of Podcast Launch, the creator of Podcasters’ Paradise, and has been named the Best of iTunes in 2013, with over 7.4 Million downloads. and subscribers in 145 countries. John is very open about his financials - they’re available on his website - it’s worth checking out because the numbers are staggering.

The top two reasons to listen to this episode are:

Entrepreneurship - JLD is a legend as an entrepreneur and has extremely relevant and tactical advice for any veteran interested in working for oneself, earning extra income on the side, or wanting to grow a passion product. Resources - JLD is a storage vault of resources for entrepreneurs and the interview is full of practical steps veterans can take - today - to get started on their startup journey.

 

Selected Links Fizzle - two weeks of a free trial, reasonably priced, and a great community of early stage entrepreneurs (no affiliation with JLD or EOFire) Patt Flynn's Show, The Smart Passive Income Blog Fill in the Blank Freedom Journal - 16k sales, changes being made in people’s lives. Set & Accomplish one big goal. Podcasters Paradise - a great community of podcasters John's Free Podcast Course Recommended podcasts Tony Robbins Aaron Walker - view from the top Tim Ferriss Gary Vaynerchuk Barbara Corcoran More info on John and his background A great Forbes article on John and EO Fire Show Notes 3:20 - John's decision to leave the Army and how he approached this decision 4:53 - What habits John had to break from the military in order to be successful in his civilian career 5:37 - Johns road to EOFire and advice he'd give to veterans seeking to start their own company 8:21 - How long it took for John to be able to pay himself a salary while starting his company, EOFire 10:26 - One of the biggest mistakes that John has made with EOFire and what he learned from it 12:07 - What resources John would recommend to veterans thinking of starting their own company 15:01 - The episodes of EOFire John would recommend most to Beyond the Uniform listeners  16:15 - John's final words of wisdom for veterans

32. BTU #67 Don Faul: A Leading Veteran in Silicon Valley (Facebook, Google, Pinterest, and more)
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“There is the expectation - at least at the places where I've been fortunate to work - that growth and advancement come from a series of thoughtful mistakes. I've had to really learn in my career: being open and transparent when you make a mistake, being willing to talk about it and embrace it,  as a leader can be very hard.  I think early in my career there was this expectation that if people were looking to me to lead, that talking about any sort of mistake or misstep was a sign of weakness. When in fact I think that the best way to build trust is in fact  - with your team and with people you work with - to be open and transparent and create an environment where other people feel comfortable as well."
– Don Faul

Don is the CEO at Athos, a company that offers a wearable technology that is fully integrated in workout clothing, and can track your muscle groups, heart rate, breathing level and more. They have raised over $50M in funding since their founding 4 years ago. Don started out at the Naval Academy, after which he served for five years as an Marine Corps as part of the Force Recon. After his transition out of the Marines, he went to Stanford Business School, after which he joined Google in 206 as a Manager of Online Sales and Operations. Two years later, he joined Facebook as the VP of Online Operations, and four years after that Pinterest as the Head of Operations. He serves on the Board of Nuru international, which listeners may remember from Episode #68 with Nuru’s founder, Jake Harriman.

Many people I’ve interviewed on the show have recommended I interview Don. Brad Bonney from episode #4 and Jimmy Sopko from episode #6 both credit Don as being an enormous help in their careers at AriBnB & Pinterest respectively. Don not only has an incredible background at the most famous companies in Silicon Valley, but he’s also a constant advocate for veterans and frequent mentor for those going through career transitions.

This episode is shorter than normal but it is chalked full of great advice not just for those of you thinking about a career in tech, but any veteran seeking to get the most out of their career.

 

Selected Links Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books Show Notes 1:08 - Don's background 2:31 - How Don decided to leave the Marine Corps and how he decided to go to the Stanford Graduate School of Business 3:50 - How Don used grit and determination to get his first role at Google, and how a veteran at Google ultimately made the difference in getting Don's resume through the door and coaching him through the interview process 6:15 - Don's advice on how veterans can better tell the story of their military background, and how important (and rare it is) for a candidate to be exceptionally well prepared for an interview. He talks about anticipating what an interviewer might not know about your military background or misconceptions they may have about it, and how to address this. He also talks about how veterans can come across better by being the MOST prepared person for the interview, and by having some well crafted and practiced stories to tell in the interview. 10:25 - Don's risky move from Google to Facebook, and how it was based on following a mentor, Sheryl Sandberg. He left Google much earlier than he had expected, but was excited by the team and learning opportunity  13:45 - How Don followed a similar path when he left Facebook for Pinterest 15:18 - After Pinterest, Don took a break before starting at Athos. After having moved from one company to another for so long, Don reflects on wanting to have taken more time in between each company to reflect.  17:05 - One of the biggest mistakes that Don made since leaving the Marine Corps and what he learned from it. He talks about how he loves tech because there is the expectation that growth and advancement will come through a series of thoughtful mistakes. 20:20 - Having mentored so many veterans, a few of the more common mistakes Don sees veterans make. First, vets assume that roles are off the table and not possible. The second is that veterans commonly underrepresent the skills that they bring to the table, namely leadership and responsibility. He has great advice for combatting both of these two misconceptions. Don't take anything off the table and recognize how impressive your background is.  23:50 - Don's current role as CEO and how he found his way into the wearable technology space (even though he ended his time away from work sooner than he had expected). In finding Athos, Don followed advice he often gives to veterans to start their career search. He made a list of the companies who's products or services resonated with him personally. He used popular tech blogs and conversations with friends (especially with investors) to add to and help build that list. What stood out for him with Athos was the mission "to build better athletes" and help everyone get the most out of their training. It sat at the intersection of his love of technology and his love of fitness and sports. Being an early adopter of gadgets and in particular health gadgets, he found himself getting really excited each day thinking about this. The second was the mixture of 50% familiarity with a role and 50% the challenge of something new and unexpected.

33. BTU #66 - Sean Barney: Purple Heart recipient to Congressional Candidate
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“I think many of us served because we love this country and love what it stands for. I think - like many people - I'm frustrated that our representatives are not as good as the country they represent. They've allowed the American Dream to fade; they've allowed money to become the dominant influence over politics; they've failed to address some of the defining issues of our time like climate change. And I think that our democracy is our inheritance as citizens and that as citizens we deserve better. And I think that veterans have that love of country that can motivate us to run into the breach and I think we have a lot to offer."
– Sean Barney

Sean Barney is a public defender. He started out at Swarthmore College, after which he served for five years as a Machine Gunner in the 25th Marine Regiment, where he was awarded the Purple Heart. Since transitioning from the Marines, Sean has worked at the Think Tank, Third Way. He has also been extremely active in politics - one of the main things we’ll talk about today - his experience here is extensive but a few highlights are serving as both the Campaign Manager and then Policy Director for Governor Jack Markell  and a Candidate for Congress. Sean holds a Master of Arts from Columbia University, a Masters of Public Administration from the Harvard Kennedy School of government, and a Juris Doctor from Yale Law School.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

Purple Heart: Sean shares the story of his life threatening injury in Iraq, and how this shaped his thoughts on career and life Public Service: Sean recently ran in an extremely close race for Congress in Delaware. His motivation for seeking office is inspirational and one that would benefit any listener Openness: Sean was one of the first veterans - if not the first veteran - to openly discuss his experience with PTSD while he was on the campaign trail. He talks about how this was motivated out of an obligation to help others and set an example.

 

Selected Links New Politics - the organization that helped Sean (and other veterans) run his campaign for office. Vote Vets - continues to focus on matters including, but not limited to, foreign policy, energy security, veterans’ unemployment, and opening military service to life-long Americans born to undocumented immigrants, as well as continued investment in care for veterans. Team Rubicon - Disaster Response Veterans Service Organization on Team Rubicon. Show Notes 1:40 - Sean’s background 2:30 - The story behind Sean’s Purple Heart 6:10 - How Sean’s brush with death affected his view of life and career 8:44 - How Sean’s life-threatening injury lead to one year of recovery and an unexpected departure from the Marines 11:00 - Sean’s advice for other veterans who may face a career transition earlier than they expected 13:45 - A look at Sean’s recent, hard-fought democratic congressional race in Delaware, and how he first decided to run for office 16:37 - An overview of New Politics, and how they helped Sean prepare for his campaign 20:00 - What life looks like on the campaign trail 23:30 - What it was like having to raise money as part of a campaign, and how much time this takes 28:30 - How Sean was amongst the first (if not the first) veterans to talk about his personal experience with PTSD on the campaign trail 32:20 - What it was like to come forward very publicly with something that - until that moment - had been a private matter 33:53 - What day-to-day life is like on the campaign trail and how Sean managed his campaign 37:11 - The most difficult moment in Sean’s 10 months of campaigning 39:35 - How this influenced Sean and how it would affect a future campaign 43:17 - Resources Sean would recommend to veterans considering a career in public service 45:02 - How much money Sean raised during his campaign 47:15 - Final words of wisdom

34. BTU #65 - Mark Frank: Army to Serial Entrepreneur and Founder of Four Companies
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“He said, 'This is where you see what you're made of. This is either where you fold up and die, or you push through and figure [stuff] out and make it happen.' And so luckily I was able to keep working through it and keep pushing things forward incrementally, and then recognize that there were some strategic things that we needed to do to fix it. That's what created Next Oncology, which transitioned a $3 Million a year revenue business to a $7-8 million a year business."
– Mark Frank

Mark Frank is the CEO and Co-Founder of Sondermind, a startup that is focused on making mental health services more accessible and accepted for everyone. He started out West Point and served as an Logistics Officer in the Army for five years. After the Army, Mark earned both his MBA and Masters of Engineering Management at Northwestern University. After grad school, he an Associate Investment Banker at Morgan Stanley for two years before serving as Founder & CEO at Next Oncology. After six years at Next Oncology, he sold the company in a deal that brought a 12X return to investors. In addition to founding Sondermind and Next Oncology, Mark has also started SafeImageMD and TermScout, as well as served as the Managing Director of the investment company, Goldwing Capital.

The top two reasons to list to this interview are:

Originality: Mark took a relatively non-traditional route to entrepreneurship. He first went into finance at Morgan Stanley, before starting his first company. He talks about how this path helped him on his entrepreneurial journey. Serial Entrepreneurship: Mark has helped start four companies and sold two of them. He's got tons of great advice on how to go about starting - and growing - your company Our Sponsor

Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books

Selected Links Recruiting company referenced: Cameron Brooks Mark's companies Sondermind Next Oncology SafeImageMD TermScout Great veteran resources for entrepreneurship: Patriot Bootcamp, Bunker Labs Fred Wilson's Blog, Mattermarks Email Newsletter Show Notes 1:40 - Mark's background 3:20 - At what point Mark knew he would leave the Army, and how he approached this decision 4:45 - How Mark decided to go directly to graduate school rather than to industry 7:25 - How Mark got his MBA and MS in three years at Northwestern, and why he would recommend this route 10:19 - What lead Mark to Morgan Stanley for his first job out of graduate school, rather than consulting (as he had originally intended) 14:50 - what family life was like while at Morgan Stanley, while working 100 hours per week, and how this compared to Mark's time in the military 16:30 - Given Mark's history in startups, how he views his time in the world finance and would he recommend this route to other veterans 19:40 - The starting point of Mark's first company, Next Oncology 26:40 - How Mark overcame the security and safety of a great job at Morgan Stanley to jump into the uncertainty of startups 29:14 - The worst moment at Next Oncology and what Mark learned from this experience 33:23 - Mark's proudest moment at Next Oncology 35:20 - What it was like selling Mark's first company, Next Oncology for over a 12X return 38:56 - How Mark started SafeImageMD, TermScout and Sondermind while still at Next Oncology 51:26 - Mark's advice for veterans thinking of starting their own company 54:10 - Resources Mark would recommend to veterans to help in their civilian career 58:00 Mark's final words of wisdom for veterans

35. BTU #63 - Todd Ehrlich: From SEALs to Founder of Kill Cliff
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“I'll never forget my fiance and I at the time were going to visit some relatives, and I pulled over before we got the house and said, 'Hey I'm about to spend a bunch of money on an idea to start this drink called Kill Cliff  and I might not get anything out of it, but at least I can say that I tried and I did it.' And you told me, 'You're going to be great - you're going to do awesome. You'll make more money if we lose the money.' Having her support me at that moment in time was incredible, and so I moved forward with it."
– Todd Ehrlich

Todd is the Founder of Kill Cliff, maker of the recovery drink with the same name. Kill Cliff has about 40 employees and makes continuous donations to the Navy SEAL Foundation. Todd also serves as the CEO at BAM Worldwide, the leading provider of cash management technology for small to medium transportation companies. He is also the Founder & Chairman of Triserv Appraisal Management Solutions, a real estate appraisal management company. Todd started out in the Navy, where he served as a SEAL for four years. After his transition from the military, he held a variety of positions at Kroll Associates, United Rentals, and Jacobs Private Equity.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

Having started multiple companies, a look at whether or not Todd's other employment experiences were necessary in starting his company How Todd started the 301st fastest growing company in America, Kill Cliff  Given that Todd's companies are so different, how passion is the most important element in creating a company How Todd keeps his focus on the 1st 1000 days of a company, rather than running a company indefinitely And much, much more…

 

Selected Links Reading Recommendations Harvard Business Review - The Best Entrepreneurs Are Missionaries, Not Mercenaries Mindset: The New Psychology of Success Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance - understanding people’s mindset and why some people succeed and others fail The Sociopath Next Door - how common sociopathic tendencies are, helped Todd as he wasn’t able to understand people who weren’t good people; helped him to see that people have different values and helped better categorize people and not assume that everyone was like his SEAL friends Show Notes 2:09 - Todd's background 2:45 - Todd's decision to leave the Navy SEALs for a civilian career 5:02 - The point at which Todd decided to start Kill Cliff 8:40 - Having started multiple companies, a look at whether or not Todd's other employment experiences were necessary in starting his company 12:40 - Given that Todd's companies are so different, how passion is the most important element in creating a company 15:40 - What Todd's day-to-day life looks like 21:00 - How Todd keeps his focus on the 1st 1000 days of a company, rather than running a company indefinitely 24:57 - Steps that a veteran can take TODAY to move towards starting their own company 28:42 - Final words of wisdom

36. BTU #62 - Hank Hughes: Army to Academy Award Nominee
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“There's a lot of weird stress things that come from all of this attention. But being able to take my wife to the Oscars... and being able to take my interpreter and give her somethign like that. That's one of the most unadultered good feelings I've ever had."
– Hank Hughes

Henry Hughes is an Oscar nominated writer and director who spent five years as a paratrooper in the 173rd Airborne, conducting two combat tours in Afghanistan. His unit was featured in The Outpost by Jake Tapper. Henry was featured in ABC News’ Standing Up For Heroes with Bob Woodruff where he was paired with George Lucas as a part of American Corporate Partner’s National Mentoring Program. He earned a MFA in Directing at the American Film Institute, where he received the Gary Winick Scholarship. His work has played at Telluride, AFI Fest, Mill Valley, and Cannes among others. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

How Hank kept his dream to be a film maker alive during his time in the Army How Hank discovered - and refined and rediscovered - his voice as a film maker How Hank was paired with George Lucas for two years as a mentor What it's like to be a veteran in the film industry The process of putting together Hanks' film, Day One What it was like to be at the Oscars with his wife and his interpreter And much, much more…

 

Selected Links A video of Hank's nomination at the Academy Awards: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmmYUUPzvNg Hank's film - Day One - is available on iTunes here Hank first studied film after the Army at the American Film Institute American Corporate Partners - partnered Hank with George Lucas, organization for free connects veterans with mentors An organization to check out if you're interested in this career path is the Veterans in Film and Television organization A book that I reference (and would recommend to any aspiring entrepreneur or artist) is Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear Hank Hughes 2015 Student Academy Awards Acceptance speech The Soldiers Project - free therapy for veterans Show Notes 1:21 Hank's Background 3:12 - Hank's decision to leave the Army 6:30 - Hanks dream to be a film maker since in high school, and how he kept this alive in High School 8:46 - What it was like applying to the American Film Institute 10:50 - How Hank discovered - and refined and rediscovered - his voice as a film maker 12:00 When Hank left the Army, how he passed time before the American Film Institute and the challenges he faced 13:35 - Hank's advice for veterans about their initial time directly after getting out of the military 15:50 - How Hank was paired with George Lucas for two years as a mentor 21:36 - How Hank decided if he was making movies for an audience rather than other film makers 24:25 - What it's like to be a veteran in the film industry 26:08 - The genesis of Hank's film, Day One 30:50- The process of putting together Hanks' film, Day One 32:28 - The worst moment in the film making process 35:15 - Where Hank was when he found out he had been nominated for an Academy Award 37:07 - What life was like between being nominated for an Academy Award, and the Oscars 39:38 - What it was like to be at the Oscars with his wife and his interpreter 42:23 - What it's like after the Academy Awards 47:00 - Other resources Hank would recommend to veterans interested in the film industry 52:50 - Final Words of Wisdom

37. BTU #61 - Ryan Guina: Air Force E5 to Business Owner @ The Military Wallet
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“I didn’t start it with being a company in mind. I knew it was possible to make money but I didn’t know how or how much. My goal was to make my $125 back. My goal beyond that was to have date money - maybe $100 a month to take my wife out to a nice dinner. And it took seven months to make my first $100… and then after that it just took off. And I’d say that within two years I had replicated by day job income."
– Ryan Guina

Ryan is the Founder of Cash Money Life & The Military Wallet - two websites that focus on helping people better manage their finances by offering informational articles, tips, tutorials, and product and service reviews. He has run these sites for over nine years and been featured on publications including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and LifeHacker. He started out in the Air Force, where he served for six and a half years as an Electrical-Environmental Specialist. After transitioning from the military, he worked at BearingPoint as a Management Analyst and then at the Computer Sciences Corporation as a Business Process Modeler. In addition to running his websites, Ryan currently serves in the Illinois Air National Guard.

Todd is the Founder of Kill Cliff, maker of the recovery drink with the same name. Kill Cliff has about 40 employees and makes continuous donations to the Navy SEAL Foundation. Todd also serves as the CEO at BAM Worldwide, the leading provider of cash management technology for small to medium transportation companies. He is also the Founder & Chairman of Triserv Appraisal Management Solutions, a real estate appraisal management company. Todd started out in the Navy, where he served as a SEAL for four years. After his transition from the military, he held a variety of positions at Kroll Associates, United Rentals, and Jacobs Private Equity.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

How Ryan doubled his income in just two years by doing something he loved Financial advice every veteran should hear The emotional struggle of looking for a new job and identity Resources to help veterans start their first company and advice on how to make it happen And much, much more… Selected Links Ryan's sites: Cash Money Life -  a personal finance and career journal with tips about money management, career topics, small business, increasing credit scores and more The Military Wallet - Personal finance for military, veterans, and their families. Updates for GI Bill, VA Loans, veterans benefits, military discounts and more. Wordpress - An essential component for creating your website Books Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear - this was one of my recommendations but I think it's really essential reading for creative, artist, or entrepreneur. The audiobook version is really fantastic. Conferences FinCon - financial media conference Podcasts Pat Flynn- smart passive income - anything digital marketing, apps Entrepreneur On Fire - JLD, very top level but doesn’t dive as deep, good for inspiration Tim Ferriss - what makes people tick and tricks they’ve used to be successful Other The VA Veterans of Foreign War (VFW) DAV American Legion - free of charge will look at your service and potential benefits Show Notes 2:00 Ryan’s background 2:47 - Ryan’s decision to leave the Air Force and how he approached this decision 4:31 - How Cash Money Life & The Military Wallet were born 5:47 - How Ryan has kept his company running for over seven years 8:25 - What it was like to maintain a full-time job while also growing his business on the side 9:40 - Ryan’s initial job search that landed him at Bearing Point, and advice on how to approach this 13:20 - When Ryan made the decision to jump in and work full time on his own company 16:30 - An overview of Ryan’s sites, Cash Money Life and The Military Wallet 18:13 - How Ryan knows the topics to write about each week, and how he breaks down his time 19:16 - If Ryan’s time were a pie chart, how he divides his time each week 21:30 - Ryan’s advice to other veterans considering starting their own company 24:04 - Ryan’s advice around growing your audience once you have started a company 26:00- Integrity, and the importance of maintaining this in your relationship with your customers and community 27:05 - One of the most challenging moments in Ryan’s 10 years of running his own company and what he learned from this 29:30 - The concerns that come with starting your own company and Ryan approached this 30:45 - How Ryan’s work at Computer Sciences Corporation and Bearing Point helped him in starting his own company, and advice on whether or not to dive directly into your own company 33:58 - How Ryan continues to learn as he is growing his own company and recommended resources for aspiring veteran entrepreneurs 35:45 - Books and Resources Ryan would recommend to veterans 37:15 - Ryan’s advice about finances and what he has learned with working with veterans and their finances for over 7 years 40:30 - An overview of the concept of a “Master Mind Group” and how Ryan went about creating his group 44:00 - Final words of wisdom

38. BTU #60 - Matt Miller: Air Force Pilot to Vending Machine Empire
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“I thought the corporate world was going to be the answer, and what I found out was yeah the corporation didn't control me as much as Uncle Sam did when I was in uniform. But the reality was that the rules changed all the time and they never changed in my favor in the corporate world. In the military, at least you knew what to expect with Uncle Sam. So I started to do some stuff on the side, because I wanted to have more control over our future. A buddy of mine from church mentioned one Sunday that his daughters and he had a gum ball business, and they were doing things together as a family and making money. And so initially I started out just selling gum balls."
– Matt Miller

Matt Miller is the President and Founder of School Spirit Vending, a Hassle-Free, Year-Round Fundraising company for Schools that he started over nine years ago. He is also the Host of the School Zone Podcast, a podcast resource for educators, school volunteers and the fundraising companies that serve them and their schools. And he is also the Owner of Sticker Swarm Media, a publishing company for children’s books. And also the President & Co-Founder of School News Guru - a newsletter program. He started out at the Air Force Academy, after which he served as a pilot in the Air Force for nearly nine years. After the Air Force he served in a variety of sales roles, first at the Hospital & Health Care industry with Abbott, and then with the Marketing & Advertising space with Valassis.

The top three reasons to listen to today’s episode

Empire - Matt went from being turned town for a payday loan, to working nights and weekends on a side project, to running an empire of franchises. And he’s done it completely solo for the first eight of the last nine years. He provides tactical advice on how you can do the same. Personal growth - Matt has some great advice about allocating 10% of your budget for personal growth and development and provides TONS of very specific recommendations on things to take advantage of with this budget. The Show notes are chalked full of links to things I plan to check out and would encourage you to as well. Creating the life you want - Matt burned his ships. He turned down opportunities necessary for promotion in the air force in order to have the time to devote to developing his own company. He talks about how he has constructed the life he wants for him and his family. And it is very, very cool. Our Sponsor

Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books

Selected Links Interview on EO Fire where I originally heard Matt’s story http://www.eofire.com/podcast/mattmiller/ Matt's company, School Spirit Vending, and his podcast, School Zone Podcast, and his newsletter, School News Guru "You are the sum total of the books you read and the people you hang out with" Aaron Walker is the coach that Matt hired, who also convinced Matt to make a point of attending a few events each year Matt recommends Cliff Ravencraft's online course, Podcasting A to Z Matt recommends any of Seth Goden's events based on his extreme marketing experience Matt recommends Dave Ramsey's Entreleadership event Matt credits Darren Hardy with convincing him to spend 10% of the money he makes each year on self-development Book recommendation: How to Win Friends & Influence People  Live your dreams - top 10 reasons (book he wrote), ssvb business / uniform (download for free) Show Notes 3:10 - How Matt first started School Spirit Vending  5:55 - How Matt continued to work full time while starting his company, and used his nights and weekends to get started 8:13 - How Matt runs multiple organizations, all of which feed into each other 9:48 - How Matt built a company that benefits him, his family, his franchisees, the community's children and their schools 12:20 - What Matt's typical day-to-day life looks like 13:46 - Where Matt goes today to learn, and what he would recommend to other veterans 17:30 - How Matt's initial work in sales has helped him in his entrepreneurial journey 19:40 - What skills Matt needed to acquire prior to starting his own company 21:40 - Matt's advice to veterans thinking of starting their own company 24:50 - One action that a veteran could take TODAY to start their own company 27:55 - Matt's final words of wisdom

39. BTU #59 - Dr. Patrick Leddin: Army to starting (and 11 years later selling) his own consulting company
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“It was literally something that we started over our garage, and over the course of a few years grew to a few different offices.  It was one of those situations where it became - to some degree - all consuming. My wife and I have two children and it was a situation where we always felt like we had this third child - our business, Wedgewood Group. And it probably came to every dinner conversation and every car ride and Wedgewood was just there. I think the point where I realized, 'Oh my gosh, this thing is really real' is when our payroll hit $100k every two weeks, I realized, 'what did I get myself into!'"
– Patrick Leddin, Ph.D.

Dr. Patrick Leddin is a Professor at Vanderbilt University’s Managerial Studies Program, where he teaches both Corporate Strategy and Principles of Marketing. He started out in the Army, where he served for over six years with the 82nd Airborne Division as a Platoon Leader, Staff Officer, and Company Commander. After transitioning from the Army, he worked as a Senior Consultant at KPMG. He then started his own consulting firm, the Wedgewood Consulting Group, and served as Managing Director. In 2011 Inc Magazine named Wedgwood one of the fastest growing private companies in America, and they were acquired in 2012. Patrick holds a PhD in Communication from the University of Kentucky, and has also worked as a Director & Senior Consultant at Franklin Covey for nearly 16 years.

The top four reasons to listen to todays show are:

Growing company - after 2 years in consulting at KPMG, Patrick left to start his own consulting firm. 10 years later, Inc Magazine recognized them as one of the fastest growing companies in America, and they were acquired one year later. Patrick shares the details of this exhilarating ride. Marriage - Patrick started his consulting company with his wife, and has advice and thoughts about starting a company with your significant other. Puzzle - In looking at Patricks career and life he’s done a really effective job of integrating his professional life in a way in which there is diversity in a way that adds more fulfillment to his life. He currently is a professor at Vanderbilt, consults with franklin Covery, and is an author. I find him a fantastic role model for building fulfillment into ones professional life Life’s Circle - At the very end Patrick talks about evaluating all the components of your life as a circle and evaluating how you’re performing in each area. And he talks about the incremental effort in making them better. It’s some of the best advice I’ve had on the show

Our Sponsor

Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books

Selected Links Another interview with a veteran who founded his company with his significant other is David Cho in episode #37 Books Recommendations: Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don't The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change What the CEO Wants You to Know : How Your Company Really Works Patrick's Books (also recommended) Oliver's Spot Oliver's Spot for the Public Sector: The 5 Ps Leading Government Teams to Top Results Embracing Excellence in the Public Sector Oliver's Spot for the Public Sector [Paperback] [2012] (Author) Ph.D., PMP, Patrick Leddin Brene Brown's incredible TED talk: The Power of Vulnerability (20 minutes) Show Notes 2:11 - Patrick's background 3:03 - Patricks decision to leave the Army and how he approached that decision 5:05 - Patricks' first job search out of the Army, and how he first landed at KPMG 9:25 - How, after two years at KPMG, Patrick decided to start his own consulting company 11:45 - How Patrick would advise another veteran to start their own consulting firm today 15:58 - What it was like to found and grow his own consulting firm, and a look at the day-to-day operations 17:41 - Advice to veterans who might be considering starting a company with a significant other 21:43 - The moment in Patrick's eleven year journey when things started to become easier 24:32 - The worst moment in Patrick's entrepreneurial journey 27:12 - What it was like to go through an acquisition process, and advice to other veterans going through a similar process 31:55 - What it was like to pursue a Ph.D. while running a company 34:04 - An overview of Patrick's work teaching at Vanderbilt 35:15 - How Patrick has constructed a life that energizes him in multiple ways 38:37 - The habits Patrick developed in the military that helped him be successful, and the habits he needed to break to succeed as a civilian 44:04 - Advice to veterans who want to enter academia, and the trade-offs between going to industry first or entering directly into academia. 46:24 - Books and resources that Patrick would recommend to veterans 48:15 - Final words of wisdom

40. BTU #58 - Duane France: Army NCO to Thought Leader on Veterans Mental Health
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Description:

“There is still maybe a stigma in the community. There's an idea that veterans are viewed in one of three ways. They're either a victim, this broken winged bird that needs to be nursed back to life. Or they're a villain, they're this crazy combat vet who is about to explode at any moment. Or they're seen as some sort of mythic hero. And none of those are true. No veteran I've ever known wants to be treated like a victim. Being labeled a villain could make them more aggressive. and most will resist being called a hero. And so there are these archetypes that the community sees, but in reality we're really a combination of all of them."
– Duane France

Duane France serves as the Program Director for the Colorado Veteran Health and Wellness Agency, as well as the Director of Veteran Services for the Family Care Center, and also as a Clinical Mental Health Counselor. He started out as a Noncommissioned officer in the Army, where he served for 22 years with five combat and operational deployments. Since leaving the Army he has established himself as a Veteran Mental Health Thought Leader, being listed by LinkedIn as one of the top five most influential veterans on LinkedIn. You can find him online at his website www.veteranmentalhealth.com and on Twitter as ThCounselingVet

The top two reasons to listen to today’s episode

Responsibility - Duane has devoted his career to helping veterans and established himself as a Veteran Mental Health Thought Leader. In this episode he talks about the main problems addressing the veteran community. You may think this doesn’t apply to you, but if not it definitely affects some of the people you served with. Duane has great advice that would be helpful to anyone who served in the military Counselor - Duane retired in the military and then approached his second career as a Clinical Mental Health Counselor. If you’re interested in this industry, he’s a great role model to follow.

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Selected Links A few of Duane's Posts that you may enjoy Let’s talk about Vets for a moment An Open Letter to America from One of Your Veterans - this captures Duane's frustration and desires for his brothers and sisters in the service. 8 Things a Veteran Wants their Mental Heath Counselor to Know 8 Things a Metnal Health Professional Wants a Veteran to Know We Lost Another Veteran Yesterday A Message From a Veteran To Veterans: You Have the Potential to Change the World Book Recommendations
Achilles in Vietnam: Combat Trauma and the Undoing of Character Man's Search for Meaning (especially part 1 about his experience in a concentration camp)



41. BTU #57 - Alex Pedersen: Air Force to Google to Employee #5 at a Startup
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Description:

“One [aspect of startups] is the uncertainty. I mean that in the macro level in the sense that at any moment the company could die. And I mean that at a more micro level in that you don't always know what to do. You don't know, should I spend the next 15 minutes calling back a customer, or should I spend it talking to a developer about the next product release, or should I spend it strategizing the next investor fundraising meeting. And there's almost never an obvious answer. And so to say that you're in a world of uncertainty is probably an understatement."
– Alex Pedersen

Alex Pedersen is the COO of POLCO - an early stage startup that is a political participation platform for local governments. He started out at the Air Force Academy, after which he received his Masters of Public Policy from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He served for seven years as an Air Force Officer, before transitioning directly to Google where he worked on Strategy, Planning & Analysis.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

What it's like to be employee #5 at an early-stage company, and how this compares to Google What it's like to work as part of a distrubted team, where each team member is in a different location An overview on the different types of ways you can raise funding for an early stage startup And much, much more…

Our Sponsor

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Selected Links JO Recruitment Seminars - gave basic lay of the land and the types of jobs available within different companies. Provided interview prep and company introductions Cameron Brooks Slack - chatroom based communication platform ideally designed for small, distributed teams Audible - audiobook company owned by Amazon Books Mindset: The New Psychology of Success Give and Take: Why Helping Others Drives Our Success Coursera - online courses from universities so that you can constantly be learning and growing Show Notes 1:33 - Alex's background 2:00 - The moment Alex decided to leave the Air Force and how he approached that decision 3:05 - How Alex approached his first job search after the military and how he found his way to Google 6:06 - How Alex identified the companies at which he would like to work 6:58 - How Alex applied on Google's website and what the interview process was like 7:32 - An overview of Alex's first role at Google 8:57 - A typical day at Google for Alex 10:41 - Advice for other veterans seeking to apply at Google 12:00 - Why Alex chose to not pursue another advanced degree after he left the military and before he entered into industry 13:36 - How long it took Alex to land his first job after the military 14:50 - How Alex made the decision to leave the certainty of Google to join a startup 16:03 - How Alex met the Founders of his startup, POLCO 16:50 - An overview of POLCO, Alex's startup 18:05 - What POLCO was like when Alex first joined 18:56 - Advice to veterans about how to vet and evaluate an early stage startup 21:43 - The contrast of going from Google to an employee with five employees 23:23 - An overview of Alex's role as COO at an early stage startup 24:38 - What Alex's day-to-day life looks like at an early stage startup 25:45 - What it's like to work as part of a distributed team, and how he stays in contact with his teammates 27:23 - What Alex's salary is like at an early stage startup 28:35 - Alex's experience raising funding for a startup and advice he'd give to other veterans considering raising funding 31:57 - Indications that you may like life at an early stage startup, and indications that you may not like it 34:52 - Advice on how to maintain balance in the midst of a chaotic, early stage startup 36:50 - Advice on where to go to learn skills that will help you in an early stage startup 38:20 - What lead Alex to pursue a role in operations as COO 39:12 - What skills are necessary to be successful in operations 41:28 - The most surprising aspect of Alex's transition to civilian life 43:00 - Habits that Alex had to break when he left the military 45:12 - In what ways Alex felt ahead of his civilian counterparts, and the ways in which he needed to catch up 48:17 - Final words of wisdom

42. BTU #56 - Steve Reinemund: Marines to CEO of PepsiCo
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Description:

“Frankly it was never anticipated, I certainly never expected to be the head of PepsiCo. That was not my aspiration. I say that because i think that it's important for people to take positions and work in places that they really enjoy what they're doing, not that they're doing something in order to just be prepared for the big job somewhere down the road. The problem with that is: first of all you won't enjoy it. And second of all, if you're not happy in doing it, likely the people around you won't be happy with you doing it either. And therefore you'll probably never get to that top position."
– Steve Reinemund

Steve Reinemund was CEO of PepsiCo from 2001 to 2006, during which time:

Revenues grew by $9 billion Net income rose 70% Earnings per share were up 80% PepsiCo’s market cap exceeded $100 billion.

Steve started out at the Naval Academy, after which he served for 5 years as an officer in the Marine Corps. After the military, Steven joined IBM as a Sales Rep, and then earning his MBA at the Darden School of Business. After Business School, Steven joined the Marriott, Roy Rogers division, before moving on to PepsiCo’s Pizza Hut division, where after two years he became President & CEO of Pizza Hut. During his time as CEO, he introduced home-delivery as a distribution method, overtaking market share of rival Domino's Pizza within 2 years. Steve then moved to PepsiCo’s Frito-Lay division as President & CEO, and then promoted to PepsiCo president and COO before being named to CEO two years later. After his tenure at Pepsi as CEO, Steven served as the Dean of the Calloway School of Business and Accountancy and Babcock Graduate School of Management at Wake Forest University for six years. Steven has served on multiple boards, including:

The Exxon Mobil Corporation Marriott International Walmart American Express Johnson & Johnson American Express Company Chick-fil-A The United States Naval Academy Foundation The Salvation Army.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

How Steve approached his career path to CEO of a Fortune 100 company One of the most career defining and harrowing moments of Steve's career How Steve sought mentorship and feedback when he was CEO of PepsiCo How the General Management landscape has changed and advice for veterans pursuing this career path Advice on maintaining a marriage that will last over 42 years And much, much more…

 

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Selected Links Steve's "Last Lecture" at Wake Forrest: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_j8-oag5qc Minute 34 onwards is particularly worthwhile. It's about finding your "fire" and what you want to do, and determining who you are Bloomberg article on Steve and how he got to be CEO of PepsiCo: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2012-03-12/how-i-got-here-steven-reinemund BizJournals article on Steve's career: http://www.bizjournals.com/charlotte/blog/bank_notes/2015/12/former-pepsico-ceo-steve-reinemund-talks.html Show Notes 1:05 - Steve's background 3:00 - Steve's decision to leave the Marine Corps and how he approached this decision 4:00 - Steve's journey to IBM for his first job and how he ended up there 5:40 - Some of the more common career paths for veterans when Steve left the Marine Corps 7:00 - Steve's decision to pursue a career in General Management over a more specific functional expertise 12:00 - Did Steve always know he wanted to be CEO, or was it a gradual progression? 16:38 - One of the most defining moments of Steve's career 27:22 - How Steve's job changed from Pizza Hut to Frito Lay, and then from Frito Lay to PepsiCo, and how Steve adapted to the changing challenges 34:24 - How Steve sought mentorship and feedback when he was CEO of PepsiCo 39:17 - Leadership - the traits Steve tried to maintain in the civilian world, the traits he tried to unlearn, and the traits he learned after the military 44:40 - How the landscape has changed since Steve first set out (and how Steve might approach his career differently today than when he first started out) 47:00 - Advice on maintaining a marriage that will last over 42 years 51:07 - Final words of wisdom

43. BTU #55 - Ashley Snyder: Air Force Medical Services corps to Google operations
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Description:

“Even getting my foot in the door at Google, once I had my foot in the door I had so many opportunities open. I was able to network, meet other veterans and learn about what they're doing. And that's why after one year I was in a role that I liked. It wasn't a perfect match - I was able to get into a role that I really like and it feels like a role I can do for the next five years."
– Ashley Snyder

Ashley Snyder is the Global Process Manager, Finance Operations at Google. She started out at the US Air Force Academy, where she studied Operations Research and was a Distinguished Grad. After the Air Force Academy she went on to MIT, where she earned her Masters in Operations Research, while also serving at Draper Laboratories as a Operations Research Analyst. She then served for five years in the Air Force in a variety of capacities as part of the Medical Services corps, including positions as

A Manager of TriCare Operations Budget, Manpower, and Resources Program Manager Business Plan Consultant working directly for the hospitals executive group And eventually the Executive Assistant for Pacific Air Forces Surgeon General

She went directly from the Air Force to Google, starting out as an Operations Manager in the Global Sales Operations group.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

How Ashley used career fairs to find her way from the Air Force directly to Google Advice Ashley has for other veterans about getting in to Google and finding your ideal job once you're inside An overview of career paths for someone in operations inside and outside of Google And much, much more…QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

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Selected Links NUPOCC - placement organization that helped Ashley land her first job. Geared towards submariners, but worked with Ashley (and other veterans of idfferent background). They've helped place people at Google, Palantir, Facebook, Stanford, Wharton, Med School and more Bradley Morris - recruiter Ashley initially considered but decided against due to the salaries she was seeing from veterans going this route Other BTU interviews about Google interviews: Steve Muller - applied through front door, transitioned from finance industry Book Recommendations PCS to Corporate America: From Military Tactics to Corporate Interviewing Strategy Project Management: Secrets Successful Project Managers Know And What You Can Learn From Them. A Beginner's Guide To Project Management With Tips On Learning ... Project Management Body of Knowledge) Show Notes 1:40 - Ashely's background 2:53 - An overview of Ashley's role at Google 3:38 - A day in the life of Ashley at Google 5:02 - An overview of Ashley's first role at Google as an Operations Manager and how she got her job at Google 8:22 - How Ashely faced an unexpected transition from the Air Force 10:22 - How Google initially found her way to Google through a NUPOC conference 13:50 - An overview of the Google application process and advice to other veterans seeking to work at Google 15:50 - Additional resources Ashley would recommend to prepare for your career transition 17:40 - Why Ashley decided against getting another advanced degree prior to going to industry at Google 23:00 - Ashley's focus on operations and how it relates to finance 25:20 - Habits that Ashely has tried to keep from the Air Force and habits she's tried to change 30:30 - How leadership at Google has differed from leadership in the military 33:00 - The most challenging aspect of working at Google 34:46 - In general, a few possible career paths for someone in operations at Google 37:40 - Indications that you may enjoy operations at Google and indications that it may not be the best fit for you 39:30 - One of the biggest surprises about Ashley's transition from the military to the civilian workforce 42:45 - Advice that Ashley would give to herself prior to leaving the military 44:04 - For someone on active duty, a few resources Ashley would recommend 47:36 - Final words of wisdom

44. BTU #53 - Ben Vickery: Marine Corps Sergeant to Google Finance
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Description:

“I think that the biggest thing is don't sell yourself short. I see too many people getting out - on both the officer and enlisted side - that look at these really simple programs. They’re great programs that may have transition assistance to get you into certain career fields, or take that first available job, or do something - if you’re working in logistics - to go right back into logistics. But all too often people do it because it’s convenient, rather than because it’s what they want to do. And I think that by really realizing that you’re capable of looking at a lot of different things, and that you’re capable of working at a lot of different places - figure out what you want to do rather than what’s easily available."
– Ben Vickery

Ben Vickery works at Google as a Finance Associate. He is also pursuing his MBA at Berkeley while full time at Google. He started out as Sergeant in the Marine Corps and served for nearly five years, including time as an Afghan Pashto Cryptologic Linguist at 1st Radio Battalion. After the Marines, he went to Columbia University and then on to Google. He also works as an Associate Instructor at Four Block, an organization that equips high potential veterans to achieve great careers at our nation’s top companies.

The top reason to listen to today’s episode is:

Rockstar - Ben was a Sergeant in the Marine Corps. Since transitioning out of the military he went to Columbia University, and landed a job at Google as a Finance Associate directly out of Columbia. As if that weren’t enough, he’s pursuing an MBA at Berkeley’s Haas School of Business WHILE at Google. He has a great story of how he got there and what he learned along the way.

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Selected Links Ben interned at the startup, Venwise Google's Veteran Network is known as VetNet Another related great interview to check out is my interview with Jimmy Sopko Organizations mentioned in our discussion Student Veterans of America Service to School Leadership Scholar (for US Marine Corps) Show Notes 1:37 - Ben's background 2:13 - Ben's decision to transition from the Marine Corps to the civilian world 2:53 - How Ben decided to go to college vs. directly to industry 3:38 - Resources and advice that were helpful for Ben in applying to Columbia 4:31 - The internships Ben pursued while at Columbia, and how this helped him narrow in on what he didn't want to do 8:02 - How Ben decided to apply to Google 10:56 - Advice for veterans thinking of applying to Google 12:04 - How Ben prepared for his interview at Google 12:51 - An overview of Ben's role as a Finance Associate at Google 13:40 - What Ben's life at Google looks like on a day-to-day basis 14:55 - Common advice Ben gives to veterans who reach out to him about Google 18:33 - Habits Ben has tried to maintain - and break - from the military 21:12 - Indications that a veteran may like life as a Finance Associate at Google, and indications that it may not be a good fit for you 22:58 - Advice Ben would give to himself when he first left the Marine Corps 23:54 - The ways in which Ben has felt ahead and behind his civilian counterparts 27:18 - How Ben thought about the Reserves 27:50 - Advice to those on active duty about what they can do right now to prepare for their civilian career 30:40 - Final words of wisdom

45. BTU #52 - Chris Pestel: Army to Photographer with ESPN, Playboy and more
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Description:

“From the process of going through West Point and then being an officer and then deciding where you're going to next, one of the first things that is told to you is that you can go do whatever you want; you can write your own path. I think I took that to heart. If I can do whatever I want, this is what I want to do. It was a thing where I picked up a camera and started photographing a few things, and really, really enjoyed it. It was very intuitive and I liked that. It was the closest thing I had found to playing sports, where I was building muscle memory and then let that instinctive ability take over and get lost in the flow of what's going on. And I really wanted to keep doing that - if I got to choose what I would do, that's what I wanted to do. Then just dove neck deep in it and tried to figure it out."
– Chris Pestel

Chris Pestel is the Founder of Pestel Photography, and has worked as a freelance photographer for ESPN for nearly 9 years now. He started out at West Point after which he served as an Army Officer for five years. After his transition he started out as a photographer at Carolina Sports, before moving on to Playboy Enterprises as a Junior Designer & Photo Editor. He’s also served as the Director of Public Relations for his high school alma matter, Montini Catholic. Chris has run his company - Pestel Photography - for over 9 years, making him on the verge of the 4% of entrepreneurs who keep their company running for 10 years.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

How Chris got his start with photography How Chris found his first job in photography with Carolina Sports What Chris' day-to-day life looked like at his first job with Carolina Sports How Chris trained and improved himself as a photographer What day-to-day life was like at Playboy How Chris founded his own company, Pestel Photography How Chris got started with ESPN And much, much more…

Our Sponsor

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Selected Links Lynda.com - free with many public libraries ($20-25 / month), but a great resource for learning any new skill Book Recommendations: Stephen King's book about writing: On Writing - A Memoir of the Craft The Art of Play: Ignite Your Imagination to Unlock Insight, Healing, and Joy Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear Show Notes 2:45 - Chris' background 3:28 - Chris' decision to leave the Army 4:35 - How Chris got his start with photography 6:20 - How Chris decided to start a career in photography 8:10 - How Chris found his first job in photography with Carolina Sports 10:57 - What Chris' day-to-day life looked like at his first job with Carolina Sports 13:30 - How Chris trained and improved himself as a photographer 14:58 - Specific resources Chris would recommend to other aspiring photographers 19:32 - How Chris transitioned from Carolina Sports to Playboy 27:39 - What day-to-day life was like at Playboy 30:00 - How Chris approached the opportunity at Playboy 32:50 - How Chris' approaches mentors and role models as an artist 37:12 - How Chris founded his own company, Pestel Photography 40:31 - How Chris got started with ESPN 43:24 - In what ways Chris' military service has helped him and in what ways he's had to break habits 49:34 - If Chris could give advice to himself when he separated from the military, the one piece of advice he'd give to himself 53:39 - Final words of wisdom

46. BTU #51 - Robert Underwood: Retiring in the Navy and hiring a PhD to help with career coaching
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Description:

“I've been retired for 6.5 years now and some of the things that I've learned are that it's different after you leave active duty; the people are different and your motivations are different. One of the things you need to figure out how to do is relax, because most things just aren't as important as they were when you were wearing a uniform. And that's ok. It's ok to relax."
– Robert Underwood

Robert Underwood served as an Officer in the Marine Corps for 25 years, retiring as a Colonel and works as a Business Development Manager in the Electronic Manufacturing Industry at Eaton.

The top two reasons to listen to today’s episode:

Start with why - Bob has some incredible advice about figuring out what you want to do with your career, and how this is a process that occurs every 3-5 years for most people. He talks about finding the why that makes sense to you right now - not the one that made sense in the past, and provides a specific example of how this got him a job at Amazon Interview prep - Bob has some exceptional advice about preparing for interviews. Rather than using books like “200 questions to prepare for an interview” he provides practical and tactical steps to get ready now Perspective - Bob left the military and returned shortly after as active reservist through his retirement. He talks about the perspective this has given him and the the advantages of retiring Business Development - at very end, describes job at Eaton in BD, which is a great overview. Our Sponsor

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Show Notes Placement agencies (free and get you lots of exposure): Lucas Group, Orion Group Book recommendation: The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon Operation connect - San Diego Chamber of Commerce American Corporate Partners - matches veterans with veterans FOR FREE LinkedIn's Veteran Mentors Network Show Notes 1:55 - Bob's background 4:11 - How Bob approached his decision to leave the military 5:21 - How do you know whether or not leaving the military is the right decision for you? 6:21 - How to consider leaving the military when you're uncertain of whether to disclose this process to those around you 8:55 - How Bob approach his first job search 10:20 - How Bob hired a PhD to help him figure out his ideal career 11:40 - What Bob's 30 minute coaching sessions looked like 13:06 - How Bob's coach - after he understood Bob's motivations - helped him explore job possibilities 20:33 - How Bob revisits his "why" frequently as he evaluates new job possibilities 32:00 - How Bob found his way to Amazon 33:04 - Advice on how to best prepare for an interview 35:20 - Advice on how to find a coach 39:30 - Other resources Bob would recommend 44:01 - An overview of Eaton and the role of Business Development 47:57 - Final words of wisdom

47. BTU #25 - AIleen Teague: Marines to Fulbright Scholar to PhD Student
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Description:

“I know that sounds really broad, but that's what people in academia are doing - it's knowledge production. It's not just sitting around sitting on a beach chair reading and thinking 'I love foreign policy' it's actually reading some of the dry stuff, engaging with others, writing, thinking and seeing whether or not you agree with the way we see things now and if you don't, do you know ways to change the way we look at things."
 – Aileen Teague

Aileen Teague is a Ph.D. Candidate at Vanderbilt University, where she studies, U.S. and Latin American History. She will finish her doctoral studies next summer and move toward her ambition of being a history professor. She teaches history at both Vanderbilt University and Nashville State Community College. She serves as an assistant coach on the marksmanship teach of the Nashville all boy's school Montgomery Bell Academy.

She started out at Boston University where she studied History and participated in the NROTC program. After this she served for 4 years active duty and then 4 years as a reservist as an officer in the US Marine Corps. After leaving the Marine Corps, she earned a Masters of Arts in History at Vanderbilt, and received a Fulbright Scholarship that took her to Mexico City to conduct research on Mexico's experience with the U.S. war on drugs over the course of 10 months. Since returning from Mexico Aileen has published various opinion pieces on her research and continues to write her dissertation, which focuses on the effects of U.S. drug control policies in 1970s Mexico.
In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

An overview of life as a PhD student Having so much unstructured time, how Aileen structures her day How to prepare financially to give yourself time to find what you want to do Some typical career paths post-PhD An overview of the Fulbright Scholarship And much, much more…

 

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  Show Notes 2:16 - Aileen's background 3:53 - An overview of life as a PhD student 5:12 - Having so much unstructured time, how Aileen structures her day 7:07 - How long a PhD process takes 10:25 - How Aileen knew she wanted to pursue a PhD 14:16 - How to prepare financially to give yourself time to find what you want to do 16:06 - Side jobs that come to mind as ways to generate side income 20:06 - What the PhD application process looks like 23:15 - What Aileen plans to do after her PhD 25:27 - Some typical career paths post-PhD 29:03 - Indications that you may love life as a PhD... and indications that you may not like it 31:58 - The hardest part of pursuing a PhD 35:05 - Advice for veterans pursuing a PhD 36:46 - How Aileen decided to leave the Marine Corps 37:47 - An overview of the Fulbright Scholarship 45:57 - Advice to any veteran considering applying for a Fulbright Scholarship 48:00 - The more surprising aspects of Aileen's transition to civilian life 50:44 - Final words of wisdom

48. BTU #49 - John Quarles: From SEALs to Chief Financial Officer
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Description:

“In the private company world these companies are typically on 2-2.5 year funding cycles. If you don't get the next check in, the entity may go belly up. The person who feels the most pressure in that situation is the CFO - you're looking at payroll, vendor payments, at office lighting. You've got better visibility into when things reach cash exhaustion. And you expect CEOs to be very optimistic and Heads of Sales to be very optimistic in believing it will come, but when you're not seeing it, you're not holding the sales order and you've got a backlog of payments that can be pretty nerve wracking. But you can also thrive in the fact that in some situations the weight of the company is on your shoulders and for me that's highly motivational. "
 – John Quarles

John Quarles has served as the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) for two different startups, where he has raised over $150M of equity and debt for his companies. John is a graduate of the US Naval Academy, and served as a Navy SEAL as part of SEAL Team 8. After transitioning from the military, he worked as a consultant at Accenture for one year prior to attending Harvard Business School. After HBS, he entered the Finance Industry and began his progression towards CFO.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

What day-to-day life looks like as a CFO The most challenging aspect of being CFO The advantages of gaining experience prior to pursuing an MBA More tried and true career paths to the position of CFO And much, much more… Selected Links from the Episode Recruiters: Lucas Group FP&A - Financial Planning & Analysis certification Finance Companies mentioned: Deloitte, Ernst & Young (EY), Price Watterhouse Couper (PwC), Grant Thornton, Baker Tilly Show Notes 1:53 - John’s background 2:35 - An overview of the role of Chief Financial Officer (CFO) 4:30 - What day-to-day life looks like as a CFO 11:50 - The most challenging aspect of being CFO 15:37 - John's journey from the Navy to consulting and his initial job search 18:06 - The advantages of gaining experience prior to pursuing an MBA 20:06 - How John decided to pursue a career in finance 24:00 - John's path from entering finance to becoming a CFO 27:00 - More tried and true career paths to the position of CFO 29:45 - Indications that you may love the job of CFO... and indications that you may hate it 36:11 - The ways in which John felt ahead and behind based on his military service 38:38 - Habits John had to break when he left the military, and positive habits he's tried to maintain 43:03 - Some of the more surprising aspects of a transition to civilian life 49:30 - Final words of wisdom

49. BTU #48 - Kate Kranz Jordan: Navy to Public Service @ Veterans Campaign
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Description:

“Veterans, writ large, miss being in the military because of that sense of community and a greater pruprose. In that sense, politics is a perfect fit for veterans: you work hard with a group of people to solve problems, and make a difference and serve your country; the mission statements are perfectly aligned. The thing that I think gets hard for a lot of veterans getting into the political space is that in order to get elected you have to be able to go out and tell a community of people why you're so great and why they should vote for you. Veterans as a group are a little more reserved about that."
 – Kate Kranz

Kate Kranz is the Director of Women's Initiative at Veterans Campaign, a non-partisan, non-profit organization whose mission is to encourage, mentor and prepare veterans, transitioning service members, and other members of the military community for a "Second Service" in civic and political leadership. She started out at the Naval Academy, and served as a Naval Flight Officer for 11 years. She is finishing up a Masters of Law and Diplomacy from Tufts University, and a Master’s of Administrative Leadership from Oklahoma University.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

An overview of the Veteran's Campaign and what they do How veterans can work with Veteran's Campaign In what ways veterans would enjoy the world of politics and what might be more challenging How Kate figured out what she wanted to do after an unexpected transition to a civilian career And much, much more… Related Links Kate's company, Veterans Campaign: http://www.veteranscampaign.org/ Center for American Women in Politics at Rutgers: http://www.cawp.rutgers.edu/ Homefront Rising - encourages and helps military spouses to run for office Service 2 School - free help for any veteran to get into your ideal college or graduate school program American Corporate Partners - free mentorship for any veteran pursuing a career in business Vets for Diplomacy Hill Vets - increasing veteran involvement in government and advocacy Vet Tech Trek - VetTechTrek runs immersive recruiting events for veterans and their spouses. Show Notes 2:02 - Kate's background 2:52 - An overview of the Veteran's Campaign and what they do  3:56 - How veterans can work with Veteran's Campaign 6:08 - What Kate's day-to-day life looks like 10:40 - In what ways veterans would enjoy the world of politics and what might be more challenging 13:43 - Kate's decision to leave the military 19:33 - How Kate figured out what she wanted to do after an unexpected transition to a civilian career 24:33 - The most surprising aspect of Kate's transition to civilian life 30:10 - How people on active duty can start preparing right now for their eventual transition to civilian life 33:00 - Final words of wisdom

50. BTU #76 - Liz McLean: Air Force to Recruiter and Senior Director at Military.com
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“[Veterans] rush into [their first job]. They worry so much about the changes that they don't pause and really think about what the next step is. Now, not everyone has the luxury of preparing for six months. Sometimes they are medically discharged or there are other extraneous circumstances that make their transition come upon them much quicker. But there are so many times that I see veterans rush into a role without looking at the broad picture first."
– Liz McLean

Liz McLean is the Senior Program Director of Veteran Employment at Military.com, as well as the Owner & President of Liz McLean Veteran Solutions. She started out at the Air Force Academy where she served for five years as a Logistics Readiness Officer. Since 2010 she has worked as a recruiter for civilians and veterans, with multiple companies including positions at Booz Allen Hamilton and Hewlett-Packard where she worked to refine veteran programs. Liz holds a bachelors in behavioral science and a Masters of Science in Industrial Organizational Psychology, where she focused on the people versus the product for program efficiency. Her passions are fueled by ultra-running and up to the ironman distance triathlon

The top three reasons to listen to today's are:

#1 Transition Advice - Liz has worked as a recruiter for top companies including Booz Allen Hamilton and Hewlett-Packard. Each of us only make a transition from the military once, but Liz has worked with hundreds of veterans in their transition. Her advice on this is really worthwhile. #2 Recruiting - a career path that not a lot of veterans consider is being a recruiter. Liz talks about what it's like, and how you can succeed in this career path. #3 Starting a company - Liz chose to start her own recruiting company rather than join an established company. She's got some great advice for vets thinking of starting their own organization.

Selected Links

Military.com Lots of articles on how to know what you like Skills Translators - help you break down the areas you might go into based on your prior military field Liz's company is Liz McLean Veteran Solutions Book Moving the Needle: Get Clear, Get Free, and Get Going in Your Career, Business, and Life! - How to network properly; does a good job of breaking down the networking skill sets Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t Show Notes 1:43 - Liz's background in the Air Force until today 2:30 - Liz's decision to leave the Air Force and how she approached this decision 3:50 - What Liz learned in her first job search outside of the Air Force 8:03 - How Liz thought about agreeing to 100% commission based salary, and why she wouldn't recommend that veterans consider a commission based salary for their first job 12:07 - Liz's current role at Military.com and what her day-to-day life looks like 14:58 - With so much experience recruiting, a few common mistakes that Liz sees veterans making in their first job search outside of the military 18:30 - Resources that Liz would recommend to veterans to help in their civilian career 20:48 - Liz's advice for veterans interested in starting their career as a recruiter, and an overview of the career of a recruiter 24:26 - The most challenging part of Liz's job 26:06 - How Liz started her own company, and why this was an important career decision for her as a recruiter 28:08 - The Pros & Cons of starting your own company as a recruiter, vs. joining an established company as a recruiter 31:33 - Liz's advice to any veteran interested in starting their own company 33:00 - One of the biggest mistakes Liz made since leaving the Air Force and what she learned from it 34:54 - What habits Liz tried to maintain from the Air Force, and habits she needed to break to be successful in her civilian career 39:15 - What surprised Liz the most about her transition from the Air Force to civilian life 41:24 - Liz's final words of wisdom

51. BTU #47 - Tom Pae: Army to LinkedIn & Slack
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“When you go into a project, everyone has the understanding that they probably don't know what the right answer is. At Slack we're very successful and we've done a lot of right movement: when there was a decision to go left, we went left; when there was a decision to pick door #3, we happened to pick door #3. A lot of it is by chance and luck and at the same time when we attempt a project, I don't think anyone assumes that they know what the right answer is. Because of that there is a lot of open mindedness of being ok if this doesn't work out. A lot of the time we do things here to try it out and if it doesn't work it doesn't work."
 – Tom Pae

Tom Pae is a Sales Enablement Manager at Slack - one of the fastest growing startups in San Francisco, who has raised $540M in funding. He started out at West Point, and served in the Army for over seven years as an Armor & Military Intelligence Officer. When he left the Army he went to Columbia Business School. After that, he joined LinkedIn - first as a Sales Operations Manager and then as a Senior Learning Technology Strategist. He is married to fellow Army veteran, RaeAnne Pae, who I interviewed in Episode 26.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

An overview of the role of Account Operations Management The lifestyle component of working in a high-growth startup How life at Slack (and a high growth startup) compares to life at LinkedIn (an established company) How Tom used nights and weekends to prepare for his transition to tech And much, much more… Selected Links My interview with Tom's wife, RaeAnne - http://beyondtheuniform.io/btu-26-raeanne-pae-army-to-facebook-and-business-development/ Slack's incredible commercial about their vision for the workplace: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6sSa5NpqUI Articles mentioned about tech Recode - http://www.recode.net/ Venture beat - http://venturebeat.com/ Tech crunch - https://techcrunch.com/ Wall Street Journal Tech & Marketing section - http://www.wsj.com/news/technology General Assembly - short form content on different topics at night. Helped Tom figure out what he wanted to do Show Notes 2:37 - Tom's background 3:18 - An overview of Slack 5:50 - An overview of the role of Account Operations Management 7:42 - The day-to-day life of an Account Operations Manager 9:18 - The lifestyle component of working in a high-growth startup 11:20 - Career progressions for an Account Operations Manager 13:20 - Indications that you may be well suited for a role in Account Operations, and indications that you may not enjoy it 16:47 - How life at Slack (and a high growth startup) compares to life at LinkedIn (an established company) 21:28 - How Tom approached the decision to leave the Army 23:28 - The most surprising aspect of Tom's transition to civilian life 26:26 - Advice on whether or not to pursue an MBA after the military 30:10 - How Tom found his way from business school to LinkedIn 37:50 - How Tom pursued Operations as a starting point for his career 41:04 - How Tom decided to move on from LinkedIn 44:00 - Final words of wisdom

52. BTU #46 - Mandy Psiaki: Army to Chick-fil-a Corporate
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“In the military we like to talk about, 'we accomplish more before 9am than the rest of the world.' If you take that thought into the civilian world, it's going to hurt you. There are really smart people out there and there is so much to be learned as you make the transition. Everyone has chosen to do something different - whether you're in the military or working for Chick-fil-a, or somewhere else. They're adding a lot of value where they are. So just keep in mind that - 'I can add value too in a unique way and I have a unique skill set to bring, but there are also a lot of people around me who are really smart and adding a lot of value too."
 – Mandy Psiaki

Mandy Psiaki is a Senior Team Lead at Chick-fil-A Corporate. She started out at West Point, and served in the Army for five years as a Finance Officer. She received her MBA from Colorado State University while still on Active Duty. She started her civilian career at Proctor & Gamble, where she worked for three months as an Associate Manager, Consumer and Market Knowledge. Before she transitioned to Chick-fil-A, where she has worked for nearly five years: starting as a Franchisee Selection Consultant, a Senior Franchisee Selection Consultant, and now her current role as Senior Team Lead, Specialized Training.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

An overview of Mandy's work at Chick-fil-a What it was like getting an MBA while on Active Duty How Mandy transitioned to Proctor & Gamble How Mandy started working at Chick-fil-a and an overview of her first role as Franchisee Selection Consultant How the separation between Mandy and her husband in the corporate world differed from their separation while on Active Duty And much, much more…Show Notes 2:07 - Mandy's background 2:51 - An overview of Mandy's work at Chick-fil-a 4:15 - What her job looks like on a day-to-day basis 7:05 - The lifestyle component of her work 8:08 - The most challenging aspect of Mandy's work 9:25 - Mandy's decision to leave the Army 10:53 - How she thought about the Reserves 11:42 - What it was like getting an MBA while on Active Duty 14:46 - How Mandy transitioned to Proctor & Gamble 20:01 - How Mandy started working at Chick-fil-a and an overview of her first role as Franchisee Selection Consultant 22:20 - How the separation between Mandy and her husband in the corporate world differed from their separation while on Active Duty 25:53 - How Mandy's next role at Chick-fil-a compared to her first role 26:59 - Indications that you may like a job like Mandy's... and indications you may not enjoy it 29:07 - Common career paths for someone in Mandy's shoes 30:30 - How leadership outside of the military has differed from leadership in the military 32:12 - Positive habits Mandy has tried to maintain from the military... and bad habits she had to break 33:44 - The most surprising aspect of Mandy's transition to the civilian world 35:08 - How Mandy felt ahead of her civilian counterparts, and where she felt behind 39:40 - Final words of wisdom

53. BTU #44 - Sam Bond: Bain, Coca-Cola, and General Manager at Lyft
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“When I left Bain I reached out to a variety of folks… to explore what was out there. I kept in touch with those folks, and made a point to regularly get back in touch with people and see what they’re up to. It was after a meeting like that - we grabbed coffee and didn’t think much of it at the time, but he called me a few weeks later to let me know that Lyft was starting up in Atlanta. It was basically a lightening bolt that made me aware. It appeared and it appeared because I made contacts and maintained them."
 – Sam Bond

Sam Bond is a General Manager at Lyft - a company most listeners have probably used for their app which makes it simple for you to find a ride whenever you need one. Although only four years old, Lyft has raised $2B in funding, and has nearly 6k employees listed on LinkedIn. Sam started out at Princeton University and then served as an officer in the Marine Corps for 4 years. After his service, he attended the University of Virginia - Darden Graduate School of Business. He worked in consulting at Bain & Company as a Consultant and then Case Team Leader. He also worked at the Coca-Cola Company - first as a Director Supply Chain Strategy and then as a Group Director of Strategy and Portfolio Management.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

An overview of the General Manager position at Lyft Indications that a veteran may enjoy the role of General Manager, and indications that it might not be a good fit for them What it's like to work at an explosively growing startup (and the pros and cons of joining a company on an exponential growth path) An overview of entry level positions at Coca-Cola for a newly transitioned veteran How Sam looks back on his journey to a role of General Manager And much, much more… Links The ride sharing service, Lyft Show Notes 2:23 - Sam's background 3:27 - An overview of the General Manager position at Lyft 7:27 - Sam's day-to-day life at Lyft 11:58 - Indications that a veteran may enjoy the role of General Manager, and indications that it might not be a good fit for them 15:00 - What it's like to work at an explosively growing startup (and the pros and cons of joining a company on an exponential growth path) 19:20 - Sam's decision to leave the Marine Corps 22:05 - Sam's view on an MBA and how essential it is to a veteran aspiring to a General Manager role 24:04 - How Sam decided to enter Management Consulting at Bain & Company 26:25 - Some of the skills that Sam learned at Bain that have helped him in his role as General Manager 29:45 - How Sam's lifestyle changed between a Consultant to a Case Team Leader 31:50 - After three years, how Sam transitioned from Bain & Company to Coca-Cola 34:50 - An overview of Sam's roles at Coca-Cola 38:20 - An overview of entry level positions at Coca-Cola for a newly transitioned veteran 41:10 - How Sam transitioned from Coca-Cola to Lyft 47:32 - How Sam looks back on his journey to a role of General Manager 50:00 - How leadership outside of the military differs from leadership within the military 52:20 - Final words of wisdom from Sam

54. BTU #43 - Todd Pringle: General Manager at Stitcher, and a history of Product Management
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“Many Product Managers - most of them, actually - don't have anyone directly working for them. They work with everybody and yet are the owner - and that's a really interesting role. One of the things that I found useful in the military that I translated was: I found - personally - that getting things done, even in the military where it is more hierarchical, that treating people as peers and as experts in their area; that motivating them to get things done without using your direct authority over them was the best way to get things done. And that skill set really translates well to Product Management. "
 – Todd Pringle

Todd Pringle General Manager and Vice President of Product at Stitcher - the podcasting app that many of you are use to listen to this podcast, and was acquired by Midroll. Todd started out at UCLA, after which he served in the Navy for 4 years as part of the Supply Corps. After his transition out of the military, Todd attended the Stanford Graduate School of Business. After this he held a variety of Product Management roles - at Netscape and AOL in the early 2000s, and then eBay, AirPlay and then a company called Yoono. Todd also holds two US Patents

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

An overview of the role of General Manager & VP of Product How the role of Product Manager has changed over the last 15 years How Todd would approach the Product Manager role if he were starting over again today Indications that you may enjoy Product Management, and signs you might dislike it An overview of Todd's career in Product Management since business school Advice on the decision between joining a startup vs. a more established company Things you can do right now to start building a skill set to be a Product Manager And much, much more… Links Todd's Company - Stitcher - is my favorite app for listening to podcasts Show Notes 2:24 - Todd's background 3:26 - An overview of the role of General Manager & VP of Product 5:39 - The General Manger role on a day-to-day basis 7:12 - What drew Todd to the Product Manager role after business school 11:00 - How the role of Product Manager has changed over the last 15 years 12:45 - How Todd would approach the Product Manager role if he were starting over again today 15:12 - Indications that you may enjoy Product Management, and signs you might dislike it 17:40 - How leadership has differed outside of the military vs. inside the military 19:15 - An overview of Todd's career in Product Management since business school 24:18 - Advice on the decision between joining a startup vs. a more established company 27:52 - Things you can do right now to start building a skill set to be a Product Manager 29:55 - Habits that have helped - and hurt - veterans in the civilian world 33:29 - How to know when to move on from one company - or role - to the next 36:36 - How Todd approached the Reserves  39:09 - An overview of Todd's company, Stitcher 43:11 - Some of Todd's favorite podcasts 44:53 - Final words of wisdom from Todd

55. BTU #42 - Shaoli Breaux: Navy to maternity leave to GE's Junior Officer Leadership Program
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“It's more change than you ever think it will be, because in the corporate world plans change all the time. Everything changes even more so than in the military. Don't expect a table nine to five job where you're just going to sit in the office all day. That's what you imagine when you're in the military - 'Oh, I wish I had more stability and wasn't changing around so much.' But it's just like that if not more in the corporate world."
 – Shaoli Breaux

Shaoli Breaux is part of the Junior Officer Leadership Program at GE Oil & Gas in Houston, Texas. She started out at the Naval Academy, and served as a Surface Warfare Officer for for 5.5 years. After she left the Navy, she stayed at home to take care of her young children for two years. Then, she transitioned directly to General Electric.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

An overview of the Junior Officer Leadership Program at General Electric What the GE Junior Officer Leadership Program looks like on a day-to-day basis What it was like to re-enter the workforce after two years of maternity leave What Shaoli's experience has been like in the Reserves while at General Electric And much, much more…

 

Links GE's Junior Officer Leadership Program: https://www.ge.com/careers/culture/us-veterans/junior-officer-leadership-program Show Notes 1:35 - Shaoli's background 2:20 - An overview of the Junior Officer Leadership Program at General Electric 3:34 - Examples of the types of rotations available at a program like the GE JOLP 5:02 - What happens at the end of the two year rotational program 5:55 - An overview of the application process and advice for veterans considering applying 7:20 - What the GE Junior Officer Leadership Program looks like on a day-to-day basis 9:00 - The most challenging aspect of the GE Junior Officer Leadership Program 11:43 - Indications you may be well suited for the JOLP and indications that you may not like it 13:20 - What Shaoli wished she had known when she first started the GE Junior Officer Leadership Program 15:22 - Shaoli's decision to leave the military and how she approached this decision 16:30 - What it was like to re-enter the workforce after two years of maternity leave 17:55 - What Shaoli's experience has been like in the Reserves while at General Electric 19:20 - In what ways Shaoli felt ahead and behind her civilian counterparts 21:30 - Good habits that Shaoli learned in the military that she's tried to maintain, and habits she's had to break 23:20 - The most surprising aspects of Shaoli's transition to civilian life 26:07 - Advice on how to best prepare for one's transition from active duty 28:06 - Shaoli's final words of wisdom

56. Steven Muller
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“Prior to the financial collapse and my first day at Deutsche, I was thinking: I’m in finance, I’m on this ladder and trajectory, I’m going to make Director or Managing Director some day, it’s just a matter of time. But then after the financial collapse everything got mixed up, and it was very difficult to make life decisions when you have that cloud over your head. So, over time I started to really question whether that was the right thing for me. And I did a Google search of “which companies have the best culture” and Google came up. I applied through the online portal (“the black hole”) and was fortunate to get a call back and things worked out."
 – Steven Muller

Steven Muller works at Google as a Global Strategic Business Development for Google Play. He started out at the Naval Academy,after which he served in the Navy for four years with the Submarine Force as part of the USS West Virginia. After transitioning out of the Navy he worked for 5 years in the Finance Industry: first at Barclays Capital as their Associate Director - Head of Derivative Client Valuations, North America; then at Deutsche Bank as a Vice President. He then transitioned to Google, where was a Finance Manger for 4 years before his current role. Steven holds an MBA from the Duke Fuqua School of Business and a Master’s Degree of Engineering Management from Old Dominion University

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

What day-to-day life is like at Google How Steven made the switch from the world of finance to high tech at Google What life was like in the Finance industry during the 2008 meltdown And much, much more… Show Notes 2:05 - Steven’s background 3:07 - What Steven does at Google 4:25 - What Steven’s day-to-day life looks like 6:15 - The lifestyle component of working at Google 9:30 - Steven’s decision to leave the military 14:15 - the day-to-day life in derivatives at Barclays Capital 16:02 - How Steven transitioned to Deutsche Bank 17:40 - An MBA and whether or not it’s essential for the world of finance 19:45 - How Steven decided to move on from the Financial Services industry 22:45 - Day-to-day life when Steven first joined Google 26:50 - Advice to those looking to work at Google (or in the world of high tech) 29:45 - The switch from financial services to Finance Manager at Google 35:07 - How leadership differs outside of the military vs. inside the military 37:10 - Habits Steven had to break when he left the military 39:10 - Common veteran entry points at Google 42:40 - Final words of wisdom

57. BTU# 40 - Annie Taft: Founding a company while in the Army and following your passion
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“They kept saying: "forget about what job you want, what do you want to do?" It dawned on me and that day I ended up applying to culinary school. That's what I want to do! Forget about this corporate route I'm headed to, forget about business school. Unfortunately, the culinary school I was enrolled in when out of business a month before I left the Army. But it was a great sign that I had already made that jump, that the options were so much broader than I was giving myself credit for. In that sense, teh floodgates were already open in terms of telling myself that I could do this type of work full time. That was the distinct moment from it being a hobby to knowing that I could do this."
 – Annie Taft

Annie Taft is the Founder & Executive director of The Brazen Gourmand, which is a Lifestyle brand for the culinarily curious. She started out at West Point, where she graduated 17th in her class and served in the Army for over five years as part of the intelligence community. When she left the Army, she participated in the Stanford Ignite Program, after which she started three different companies, of which The Brazen Gourmand is one.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

What it was like starting a company while still on Active Duty, and advice for veterans seeking to do the same What Annie's day-to-day life looks like as an entrepreneur How Annie knew when to turn her hobby into a business An overview of the Stanford Ignite program, and why veterans aspiring to entrepreneruship should consider it Additional resources Annie would recommend for aspiring veteran entrepreneurs And much, much more…

 

Links The Brazen Gourmand - http://www.thebrazengourmand.com/ Stanford Ignite - https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-ignite/campus/post-9-11-veterans Vet Tech Trek Boots to business 1 Million Cups - weekly meeting of entrepreneurs (every week someone pitches their idea, surrounded by likeminded people Show Notes 2:03 - Annie's background 2:30 - An overview of Annie's current company, The Brazen Gourmand 3:40 - What Annie's day-to-day life looks like as an entrepreneur 10:00 - What it was like starting a company while still on Active Duty, and advice for veterans seeking to do the same 11:36 - The point at which Annie knew she could turn a hobby into a business 20:30 - Some of the challenges Annie faced while starting her company 24:30 - An overview of the Stanford Ignite program 35:10 - Why veterans should consider the Stanford Ignite veteran track 39:05 - Additional resources Annie would recommend for aspiring veteran entrepreneurs 42:30 - Final words of wisdom

58. BTU #64 - Anthony Garcia: Army to Founder of Guide-On, an Essential Veteran Resource
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“Me and Derek went in there and pitched to Mike [Maples] for an hour, 9am the next morning we had a term sheet. And we were about to die. We were running out of money - we pitched to Mike on September 10th, and we got a term sheet on September 11th. If you're not used to taking risks, you're going to have a hard time succeeding as an entrepreneur. I'm $240k in debt; my credit sucks; I lived with my co-founder for three years and we were in our mid to late 30s at the time; I've given up going to weddings, I gave up skiing and surfing for six years, given up love, the list goes on and on the sacrifice."
– Anthony Garcia

Anthony Garcia is CEO and co-founder at GuideOn -a military veteran talent acquisition platform. He started out at St. Mary's University, after which he served in the Army for eight years as a Medical Service Corps Officer and Medical Evacuation Pilot. After transitioning out of the Army, he received his MBA at Cornell University. Since then he has worked as a General Manager at SRI International and the CEO and co-founder of Adjacent Applications. He started GuideOn in late 2014, and has raised funding from Mike Maple’s VC firm - Floodgate, one of the most respected investors in Silicon Valley.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

Anthony's experience with PTSD and candid advice for other veterans The biggest mistakes Anthony made that made his current success possible How Anthony raised funding from one of the best investors in the world What it's like to hire your father as your Chief Information Officer (CIO) How GuideOn is a FREE resource that will translate a veterans resume instantly And much, much more… Selected Links Two resources I'd recommend to any and every veteran are: GuideOn - free resume creator tool and, soon, a candidate placement resource. What the White House has called "the Rosetta Stone for veteran placement" Line1.org - built venue for veterans, non-veterans, corporations, and thought leaders to help veterans transition. Free guidance for all veterans Show Notes 3:25 - Anthony's background 4:10 - Anthony's decision to leave the Army and how he approached that decision 5:27 - Anthony's struggle with PTSD and how he found a way through 13:37 - Anthony's thoughts on business school as it relates to entrepreneurship - how the network helped, but also how there are a lot of resources available now for veterans as an alternative 16:53 - How Cornell's network lead Anthony to the Co-Founder & Lyft and an introduction to Mike Maples that changed his life 19:08 - An overview of GuideOn and how it's one of the best FREE resources for every veteran 22:54 - When Anthony first got the idea to start GuideOn 26:35 - The most painful failures Anthony experienced after the Army and how that helped him achieve his current success 33:03 - How veterans can work with GuideOn - FOR FREE - to instantly create a resume 35:16 - Common mistakes that veterans make in their transition to a civilian career 40:04 - Anthony's advice for veterans about the fundraising process 44:04 - What it's like working with your father when he is the Chief Information Officer (CIO) of your company 49:27 - Anthony's final words of wisdom

59. BTU #39: Frank Van Buren - Blackhawk pilot to 18 years in Financial Services at Wells Fargo
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“What I'm saying is that when there is nothing at stake - you're not being paid for it or receiving credit - what are you interested in? If you can figure out what you're genuinely interested in, and you can combine that with what your natural strength is, you have the foundation for planning your future. Until you do that, you're just spinning in the wind. If you ever leave a job without understanding those two things, you're just tossing the dice."
 – Frank Van Buren

Frank Van Buren lives in North Carolina and works at Wells Fargo in their High Yield Sales & Trading Group. Frank started out at the Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania, where he did Army ROTC, after which he was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the National Guard/Reserve, and then decided to become a Chief Warrant Officer on active duty in the US Army, where served as a Blackhawk pilot for six years. After his transition from the Army, he earned his MBA from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has worked at Wells Fargo for the last 18 years, first as part of their Investment Banking group and then as part of their Fixed-Income Sales & Trading groups. He also runs the site, AdviceForVets.com.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

How to decide between Investment Banking and Sales & Trading An overview of the Financial Services industry and where you might fit in What Frank has learned from over 18 years in Financial Services How to find your dream and uncover what you might want to do for a career And much, much more…

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Links Frank has a website and blog that he maintains at: AdviceForVets.com Show Notes 1:37 - Frank’s background 3:30 - An overview of Frank’s role at Well’s Fargo 8:40 - Frank's day-to-day life 15:05 - Frank's lifestyle in sales & trading (as compared to Investment Banking) 17:45 - Frank's journey from pilot to life as a civilian 28:00 - How to find your dream and uncover what you might want to do for a career 36:00 - How to decide between Investment Banking and Sales & Trading 45:30 - Bad habits that veterans need to break when they leave active duty 54:00 - Frank's final words of advice to veterans

60. BTU#38: Chris Shaw - Army to Startup Founder and Bunker Labs
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“The autonomy is incredible. I think back to my time in the military and the best times I had was when I was flying around the mountains of Afghanistan, and we had a lot of flexibility in the mission we were running. When I think about being an entrepreneur, it's very similar to that in a lot of ways. I love that I can set my own hours and create my own success. That is really exciting and gets my adrelanine going. The bad part is that you don't have a paycheck. If you make a sale and get cash you can take a small salary from there, but there's a lot of unpredictability there. Going into this I didn't expect that aspect of this to wear on me emotionally as much as it does. But it does, and it's real - you just need to understand that that's part of the deal."
 – Chris Shaw

Chris Shaw is the Founder of CORE Leader, the Director of the NY Office of Bunker Labs at the NYU Tandon Engineering School. He graduated from NYU Stern School of Business in May 2016. He started out at Cornell University, where he earned his BA in history, after which he served in the US Army as an Aviation Officer for 8 years flying the Kiowa Warrior armed reconnaissance helicopter. He deployed twice to combat in Afghanistan, most recently as the head of his squadron’s intelligence department in the 82nd Airborne Division.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

How Chris decided to go to business school rather than industry after the military An overview of Bunker Labs, and why every aspiring entrepreneur should consider applying Advice on finding a co-founder... and how to make sure you get it right. Chris talks about the biggest mistake he made when starting his company The experiences that best help Chris prepare for his life as an entrepreneur And much, much more…

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links NYU Stern School of Business Chris' second company - CORE Leader Bunker Labs - their entrepreneurial program is EPIC Leaders Reaction Course Tough Mudder - a visit here was one of the catalysts for Chris starting his company, CORE Leader Show Notes 1:50 - Chris' background 2:30 - How Chris decided to leave the Army 3:12 - How Chris thought about joining the Reserves and why he chose not to 3:48 - The most surprising aspect of Chris' transition to civilian life 5:20 - A few bad habits Chris had to break when he left the military 6:30 - How Chris decided to go to business school rather than industry after the military 9:28 - Chris' experience at Stern School of Business and his advice on how to apply and why to go 11:10 - An overview of Bunker Labs, and why every aspiring entrepreneur should consider applying 15:20 - What Chris' day-to-day life looks like as a Director at Bunker Labs 17:40 - An overview of Chris' second company - CORE Leader 20:13 - Advice on finding a co-founder... and how to make sure you get it right. Chris talks about the biggest mistake he made when starting his company 24:17 - The experiences that best help Chris prepare for his life as an entrepreneur 25:38 - What Chris' day-to-day life looks like as an entrepreneur 27:44 - What Chris like most and least about his life as an entrepreneur 29:30 - Chris' advice for other veterans considering entrepreneurship 32:45 - How Chris felt ahead and behind his civilian counterparts 36:37 - Final words of wisdom from Chris for all veterans

61. BTU #45 – John Fenwick: Launching a Satellite Startup and Selling to Google for $500M
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“I do feel like we had 6 or 7 bet the company decisions all strung together. It felt like I was in Vegas, going to the roulette wheel and just betting on red - over and over again - and depending on each one of those to be right. Startups a lot of is timing. If we had tried to start [SkyBox Imaging] two years earlier, the technologies wouldn't have existed for us to be able to build and point a spacecraft to take a pretty enough picture. If we had come along two or three years later, someone else would have already done this. It just to be in that sweet spot, to thread the needle, I just realize that we just happened to be the right people, telling the right story at the right time."
 – John Fenwick

John Fenwick is Head of Spacecraft Operations at Google. He started out at the Air Force Academy, after which he served for 8 years in the Air Force as a Physicist & Space Acquisitions Officer. He holds a Masters in Electrical Engineering & Computer Science from MIT and an MBA from Stanford Business School. After business school, John co-founded SkyBox Imaging and served as their Vice President of Flight Programs. Skybox provides commercial, high-resolution satellite imagery and high-definition video and analytics services. SkyBox raised over $91M in funding prior to being acquired by Google for $500M, as reported by the WSJ. SkyBox is now known as Terra Bella within Google.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

Starting a company and thinking it was only a class project How to find co-founders who will complement and challenge your own approach to work Advice on raising venture capital from top investors Advice on going through an acquisition process The ways in which a military background is both advantageous and challenging for entrepreneurship And much, much more… Links John's company, SkyBox Imagine, is now known as Terra Bella: https://terrabella.google.com/ John's investors included: Khosla Ventures Bessemer Venture Partners Norwest Venture Partners (NVP) Draper Associates Canaan Partners Crunchfund Asset Management Ventures Show Notes 2:23 - John's background 4:10 - Johns journey in the Air Force and his decision to leave 7:35 - How to consider an MBA if you're a veteran pursuing entrepreneurship 8:53 - John's advice to those considering applying to business school 10:03 - How John went about finding his co-founders 11:32 - An overview of SkyBox Imaging 13:45 - Advice to veterans in seeking a co-founder for your startup 17:52 - Out of a classroom, how John started his first company, SkyBox Imaging 19:17 - Advice for those seeking to raise venture capital 21:12 - What the fundraising process was like... and what it felt like to raise his first $3M 22:57 - Day-to-day life in an early stage startup 24:03 - How a military background can help in starting a company, and how it might hold you back 28:29 - After raising funding, the next milestone in John's startup journey 31:03 - Launching their first satellite 35:40 - The acquisition process with Google 38:43 - Advice on managing an acquisition process and how to be successful 40:58 - Habits to break as you depart from the military 42:23 - Indications that a veteran may be well suited for entrepreneurship, and indications that it may not be right for you 44:37 - John's final words of wisdom

62. BTU #37 - David Cho: Starting a Cosmetics eCommerce company while in the Army
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“I'm in the beauty industry. I'm this ex-combat arms officer who knows way too much about cosmetics now. I think it's really funny. For me, timing really worked out. When we started Soko Glam, I was an Executive Aide to a General Officer. Although my time was really sporadic, for the most part I was in garrison. So I had a lot of time to research and take night classes, research certain things and go out and network. That would be my piece of advice - when you're still in really take the time to meet people and  figure out what you want to do. Do as much reading as possible but you gotta go out there and meet people."
 – David Cho

David Cho is the Co-Founder and CEO of Soko Glam - an eCommerce beauty shop and lifestyle brand with the best selection of Korean Beauty products and content. Dave started out at West Point, and served as a Combat Arms Officer for over 8 years. After his transition from the Army, David attended Columbia Business School, during which he worked at Facebook as a Global Accounts Intern. In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

How Dave started an e-commerce beauty company while on active duty in the Army What it's like to have your wife as your co-founder Resources Dave would recommend to any aspiring veteran entrepreneur WhatWhat Dave wished he had known when he first started his company, Soko Glam And much, much more…

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Links Dave's company, Soko Glam: https://sokoglam.com Book Recommendations: Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don't Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers Website Recommendations: Fred Wilson Blog TechCrunch Google News (personalized to your interests) American Corporate Partners - connects veterans with mentors in the civilian workforce Google Veterans Summit Show Notes 2:19 - Dave's background 2:53 - An overview of Dave's company, Soko Glam 4:48 - Finding a co-founder, and what it's like to be married to them 11:11 - What Dave's like as a Co-Founder & CEO looks like on a day-to-day basis 13:16 - What Dave's lifestyle looks like as an entrepreneur 16:33 - What it was like to start Soko Glam while on active duty in the Army 19:19 - Resources Dave would recommend when you're preparing to start your company 23:30 - Whether or not to consider business school when starting your own company 29:07 - How Dave's wife, Charlotte, continued to work on Soko Glam while Dave was at business school 29:37 - What Dave wished he had known when he first started his company, Soko Glam 32:32 - Some of the best advice Dave received when making the transition from the Army 38:15 - Some consistent misconceptions that Dave sees veterans make when he is mentoring veterans going through the transition to civilian life 41:30 - How to better know if you'd like a large company or start your own company 43:20 - The bad habits that Dave needed to break when he left the military 46:30 - The biggest surprises Dave experienced in his transition to civilian life 49:20 - Dave's final words of wisdom

63. BTU #54 - How Breakline Education is Helping Veterans; an interview with Bethany Coates
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“Aim high - aim way higher than you think that you should. Because you have so much to offer and we need your expertise and talent in the private sector; we'd be lucky to have you. But you've gotta go for it. Don't let this be the moment in your career or life where you settle. You've got to go for it. And so let this be the time when you really shoot for the stars because you've earned it - you've earned this opportunity."
– Bethany Coates

Normally, I interview a veteran about their civilian career. In this episode, instead, I interview an amazing company that is helping veterans in their career transition.

BreakLine is an education and employment company that builds an affordable path to compelling careers. Their programs combine skills-based training with professional networking and connect participants directly with hiring managers.

Bethany Coates is the Founder & CEO of BreakLine. She has served as the Assistant Dean at Stanford Graduate School of Business, and has been a consultant at McKinsey & Co. She holds an MBA from Stanford Business School, and a BA from Princeton University.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

What listeners should know about Breakline Education An overview of the upcoming event, Breakline Technology An overview of the application process for Breakline Tech The strengths and weaknesses that veterans bring to the private sector Advice on improving a veteran's resume, LinkedIn Profile, and interview techniques And much, much more…

Selected Links

Another interview the discusses the impact of an immersive program similar to Breakline - Tradecraft - is my interview with RaeAnne Pae (BTU #26) Some of the companies that Bethany mentioned that work with Breakline Education are: Medallia, Nielsoft, Box, Andreessen Horowitz, Paypal, BMZ, and LifeLock Breakline Tech - an alternative to traditional education and one-stop shopping experience for veterans. This program is an immersive experience with technology companies in the United States. Application Deadline: 12/6/16 Cost: $475 Duration: 1 month Dates: 2/21/17 - 3/17/17 Company immersive experience include: Andreessen Horowitz, Paypal, BMZ, and LifeLock Breakline Finance - an immersive program for veterans curious or interested in careers at First Republic Bank and in Financial Services in general Application Deadline: 1/30/17 Cost: $75 Duration: 1 week Dates: 5/1/17 - 5/5/17 Company immersive experience include: First Republic Bank Show Notes 1:51 - An overview of Breakline Education & their founder, Bethany Coates 2:55 - What listeners should know about Breakline Education 3:35 - How Bethany started Breakline Education 7:15 - In Breakline's 8 months of operation, nearly 100 veterans have worked with them. Here's a look at what some of their alumnus have done afterwards 10:25 - Common veteran backgrounds for veterans working with Breakline 12:38 - An overview of the upcoming event, Breakline Technology 19:41 - How many people will join the Breakline Technology group in February 23:58 - At the end of Breakline Technology's one month program, what they can expect 26:00 - The ideal timing for a veteran to attend the Breakline Tech group 28:38 - Indications that a veteran may be well suited to Breakline Tech, and indications that it might not be a good fit 31:03 - An overview of the application process for Breakline Tech 34:45 - The deadline for applications is December 6, 2016 35:10 - An overview of the Breakline Finance experience 37:21 - The dates for the Breakline Finance program and the deadline for the application 37:40 - An overview of the application process for Breakline Finance 38:05 - If you're unable to attend this year's Breakline Technology or Breakline Finance a look at the future schedule 38:54 - The strengths and weaknesses that veterans bring to the private sector 43:40 - Bethany's advice in regards to improving a veteran's resume 46:00 - Bethany's advice in regards to improving a veteran's LinkedIn Profile 48:20 - Bethany's advice for how veterans could improve in their interview process 49:44 - Bethany's final words of wisdom.

64. BTU #36: Nicole Schwegman - Navy to Deloitte to Navy & USAA
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“Instead of complaining about what I can't do because I'm in the Navy, I decided what can I do to help the Navy? How can I be the change that I want to see? Because if everyone leaves and decides to get out... I hate to break it to you, it's not that easy. You have all types of irritants. Just like you have irritants in the Navy there are irritants in every industry.  That  doesn't mean you shouldn't get out, but don't expect to not have irritants. And I've learned to deal with those irritants a lot better.
 – Nicole Schwegman

Nicole Schwegmen is an industry Fellow (Tours with Industry)  with USAA and is currently on active duty in the US Navy. She started out at the Naval Academy, after which she served as a Surface Warfare Officer for four years, and then a Public Affairs Officer. She first left the Navy in 2008, where she worked at a small PR firm, as a Contractor for Deloitte, and then as a Communications Partner for Gallup. She returned to Active Duty in 2010 after a deployment to Afghanistan, moved to San Diego, deployed on two different surface ships (USS Essex and USS Peleliu) then got a Master's in Journalism and Media Studies at San Diego State.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

An overview of the Tours with Industry program, and Nicole's work with USAA What it's like working at USAA, and what they do to earn their exceptional customer support reputation What Nicole learned from her first transition from the military, and how that affects her view of being on Active Duty now How Nicole's perspective on Active Duty is different than the first time she was on Active Duty And much, much more…

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Show Notes 2:30 - Nicole's background 4:05 - An overview of the Tours with Industry program, and Nicole's work with USAA 10:55 - What it's like working at USAA, and what they do to earn their exceptional customer support reputation 14:33 - What Nicole learned from her first transition from the military, and how that affects her view of being on Active Duty now 24:20 - How Nicole's perspective on Active Duty is different than the first time she was on Active Duty 31:00 - How Nicole will approach her next transition from the military

65. Casey Carroll: Sales & Trading in the Finance Industry
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“I think that’s one of the things that I love most about my job is that my whole life I’ve always been interested in the news and what’s going on in the world. Now I feel like I get paid to pay attention to it. Any obscure reference, you could make a case that it can have an effect on the market. And for that reason, you truly have to stay engaged in what’s going on."
 – Casey Carroll

Casey Carroll lives in Charlotte, North Carolina and works with Wells Fargo in their Credit Sales department. He started out at Duke University, where he studied History and Visual Arts, and was on the Men’s Lacrosse Team. He served for four and a half years in the Army with the Rangers as a Fire team Leader. After transitioning from the Army he returned to Duke, this time at their Fuqua School of Business.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

Casey’s decision to go to business school instead of going straight into industry An overview of a career in High Yield Sales & Trading in the Finance Industry The day-to-day life of someone in High Yield Sales & Trading How Casey knew he wanted to enter the world of Finance, and how he found his way to Wells Fargo Indications that you may really like a career in Sales & Trading… and signs you may hate it And much, much more…

 

Show Notes 1:09 - Casey’s road from Duke University to Wells Fargo 1:35 - When Casey knew he was going to leave the Army 3:30 - The most unexpected and surprising aspects of Casey’s transition to the civilian world 7:43 - Casey’s decision to go to business school instead of going straight into industry 11:11 - Advice for veterans applying to business school or Duke in particular 15:03 - What Casey liked most and least about his time at Duke 22:40 - An overview of a career in High Yield Sales & Trading in the Finance Industry 25:55 - The day-to-day life of someone in High Yield Sales & Trading 31:38 - How Casey knew he wanted to enter the world of Finance, and how he found his way to Wells Fargo 34:28 - Indications that you may really like a career in Sales & Trading… and signs you may hate it 37:30 - Negative habits Casey had to break when coming out of the military 41:10 - Final words of wisdom

66. Molly Laufer: Active Duty to Employee #1 at Nature Box
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“In a brand new, early stage startup, no one can be above doing something. As the months rolled on, I started to get an appreciation for just how much a startup was like my military experience. I really leaned in and relied on that experience in saying, “I’ve never done marketing, I’ve never worked in a CPG company, I’ve never worked in an e-commerce company, but what I have done is worked in a really chaotic environment without a lot of guidance and had to roll up my sleeves and get it done. So I might not know startups, I might not marketing, I might not know e-commerce or food, but I know how to operate in this environment. So trust yourself, trust your gut - you can do this."
 – Molly Laufer

Molly Laufer is the Director of Client Strategy in the Marketing & Advertising space with the Company, Oxford Road - which is the fastest growing full-service ad agency serving the Consumer Tech industry.
She started out at the University of Virginia, where she did ROTC and earned a Bachelor of Arts in Foreign Affairs and Russian. Molly then served for four years in the Navy as a Surface Warfare Officer, serving onboard the Frigate USS SAMUEL B. ROBERTS as well as with DESTROYER SQUADRON 23. When she transitioned from the Navy, she was the first employee of the startup, NatureBox - a company that now has over 100 employees and has raised over $58M in funding. At NatureBox she started with Social Media and Content Marketing, and eventually became their Director of Customer Acquisition

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

How Molly used a career counselor to figure out what sorts of jobs she would be interested in and what sorts of problems she’d like to solve How Molly approached her first job search and how she ended up as employee #1 at Nature Box What it was like to be the first employee at an early stage startup An overview of the different roles Molly held at Nature Box, and what her career progression looked like Molly’s advice to any veteran thinking of working at a startup And much, much more…


QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Show Notes 2:25 - Molly’s background 3:46 - How Molly approached the decision to leave the military 4:59 - How Molly considered the reserves 6:59 - The biggest surprises in Molly’s transition to civilian life 8:59 - How Molly used a career counselor to figure out what sorts of jobs she would be interested in and what sorts of problems she’d like to solve 9:57 - Advice on how to find the right career coach to help with a job search or career change 11:49 - An overview of the career coaching process 12:39 - How Molly approached her first job search and how she ended up as employee #1 at Nature Box 15:49 - How Molly thought about going to business school (while her husband was going to business school as well) 20:16 - What it was like to be the first employee at an early stage startup 23:59 - An overview of the different roles Molly held at Nature Box, and what her career progression looked like 29:35 - What Molly liked most and least about her experience in an early stage startup 34:59 - In what ways Molly felt ahead and behind her civilian peers based on her military experience 38:37 - Molly’s advice to any veteran thinking of working at a startup 41:04 - How Molly made the transition from an early stage startup to an Ad Agency, with Oxford Road 44:24 - The day-to-day life of an Account Director at an Ad Agency 47:05 - Molly’s final word of advice to other veterans

67. BTU #33: Brit Yonge - Navy to High Tech at Palantir Technologies
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“Just being totally honest - you really are far behind. It's a better assumption that you're behind that you're ahead. It's not like  everyone else who didn't spend time in the military is out there playing Lincoln Logs. They've got a job and they're developing skills and they're learning. I went into my transition with the assumption that I was nine years behind every pedigreed person out there. And I feel that attitude helped drive my hunger to play a very intense game of catch up."
 – Brit Yonge

Brit Yonge is the Chief of Staff to the CTO at Palantir Technologies, a Palo Alto based technology company that has raised over $2B in funding, and was co-founded by silicon valley legend, Peter Thiel.
Brit started out at the Naval Academy and served as an officer in the Navy for 5 years, where he served in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) supporting Special Operations Forces (SOF) in kinetic and non-kinetic operations. Brit transitioned from the military directly to Palantir Technologies, first as a Deployment Strategist and then as their Head of Asia ex Japan, where he lead Palantir's Asia HQ, and now as the Chief of Staff to the CTO.

 

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

How Brit, while living on a friend’s couch in San Diego, used the motivation of “one conversation a day” to search for his first job out of the military How Brit would explain Silicon Valley and the ethos of startups to someone on active duty How persistence and serendipity helped him land his first job (because he didn’t go through the front door) How you can use interviews to better understand a company’s values and how well it aligns with your own How leadership outside of the military differs from leadership in the military And much, much more…

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Viktor Frankl's Man's Search For Meaning essay: https://www.sonoma.edu/users/s/shawth/mans%20Search Show Notes 2:09 - Brit’s background 2:57 - How Brit decided to leave the Navy 4:32 - How Brit approached the Reserves and why he ultimately decided to not pursue the Reserves 5:01 - The most surpassing aspects of Brit’s transition to a civilian career 8:31 - How Brit, while living on a friend’s couch in the Bay Area, used the motivation of “one conversation a day” to search for his first job out of the military 10:49 - How Brit would explain Silicon Valley and the ethos of startups to someone on active duty 13:49 - How Brit found Palantir through his understanding of their product (and how to use the products you like to help in your job search) 18:28 - How persistence and serendipity helped him land his first job (because he didn’t go through the front door) 20:22 - How you can use interviews to better understand a company’s values and how well it aligns with your own 22:12 - In the first couple of years out of the Navy, how Brit felt ahead and behind his civilian counterparts 26:04 - The day-to-day life in a high-tech company in Silicon Valley 30:47 - How leadership outside of the military differs from leadership in the military 35:29 - How to prepare for a transition to the civilian world 43:54- Final words of advice

68. Andreas Jones - Starting your own business and making your dream a reality
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“What a lot of people do in networking is they go in with the mindset of “what can I get from it.” The important switch i made was, “what can I give to this relationship that I’m looking to start.” Stop trying to figure out what’s in it for you. Give and it’s the law of nature - if you plant seeds of good and positive vibrations all the time, it’s going to come back to you."
 – Andreas Jones

Travis Collier is is the CEO and Principal Business Strategist and Leadership Consultant at Combat Business Coaching. Andreas served in the US Army for over 8 years, where he was as a Logistics & Supply Chain Manager. In his civilian career he has worked as: a contributing writer to Forbes and The Huffington Post; a Project Manager work at The Home Depot; and a Vice President of Procurement and Strategy at the Financial Services Company, the Sun Trust.
.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

From the Army to starting his own business - what Andreas learned along the way Advice on how to find a co-founder or initial team Advice on how to learn and grow through networking What day-to-day life looked like while starting a company Advice Andreas would give to other veterans considering starting their own business And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Andreas' interview on EO Fire: 1433: Build a meaningful business that has more profit, fans, and freedom with Andreas Jones Andreas' company, Combat Business Coaching A great way to meet others and network is with MeetUp.com Book Recommendations The Compound Effect- taking 1-2 steps weeekly to get you to your goal Andreas' book - Distinguished Men: Grow in influence, Success and Significance Show Notes 1:11 - Andreas’ background 3:40 - How Andreas decided to leave the Army 4:25 - How Andreas approached is initial job search and what he learned along the way 7:01 - What Andreas does for a living, and what his life looks like on a day-to-day business 12:40 - From the Army to starting his own business - what Andreas learned along the way 15:10 - Advice on how to find a co-founder or initial team 16:10 - Advice on how to learn and grow through networking 24:24 - Other advice to help you start your own company 25:10 - What day-to-day life looked like while starting a company 28:24 - When Andreas started his own company, how he felt ahead of his civilian counterparts and where he felt behind 30:23 - Advice Andreas would give to other veterans considering starting their own business 31:05 - What Andreas has liked most and least about starting his own company 32:15 - Other resources Andreas would recommend to listeners 34:05 - The most surprising aspect of Andreas’ transition from the Army to civilian life 36:40 - Final words of wisdom for veteans

69. Brooke Jones-Chinetti: Cold emails, JPMorgan, and Startup CEO
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“Really its a full time job to get a full-time job. Sometimes with veterans, we're bringing these unfathomable managerial skills to these organizations that we transition to. But we forget that stuff shouldn't just be handed to us... I'm the queen of the cold email now, and I wish that I would have had that confidence as I transitioned to try to find veterans at companies that I was interested in, and to hear what their transition was like."
 – Brooke Jones-Chinetti

Brooke Jones-Chinetti lives in New York, where she most recently served as the CEO of VetTechTrek - a startup that facilitates high-impact trips to leading tech companies for veterans and their spouses. She started out at West Point, where she received her Bachelor of Science in Portuguese and Environmental Engineering. She served in the US Army for over 6 years, during which she deployed to Iraq as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom, and to Kuwait as part of Operation Enduring Freedom - Spartan Shield.
She also served as Senior Director of Human Resources and served as the executive officer for the Army's Chief of Signal, a 2-star general position. After her transition from the Army, she spent a year in the Financial Services industry with JPMorgan Chase & Co. as part of their rotational Executive Development Program. She is currently studying at Columbia Business School.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

Step-by-step advice on how to write cold emails to figure out what you want to do and get your foot in the door for a job An over of the JP Morgan Chase rotational Executive Development Program Brooke’s experience as CEO of an early stage startup at VetTechTrek How leadership as CEO of a startup differed from leadership in the military And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Show Notes 1:56 - Brooke’s background 3:04 - How Brooke and her husband both decided to leave the Army 6:15 - Evaluating the Reserves 10:40 - The most surprising aspect of Brooke’s transition from the Army to civilian life 13:15 - How to use cold emails to find other veterans, learn from their experience, and make connections 16:25- Brooke’s first job search and what she learned along the way 21:36 - Advice on how to manage the timing of your transition from active duty 27:20 - Advice for how to better understand yourself and what you’ll enjoy in a career 32:15 - An over of the JP Morgan Chase rotational Executive Development Program 34:50 - Brooke’s day-to-day life while at JP Morgan Chase 38:15 - Brooke’s decision to transition from JP Morgan Chase to Columbia Business School, and wy she chose an Executive Education program 43:02 - Brooke’s experience as CEO of an early stage startup at VetTechTrek 47:10 - How leadership as CEO of a startup differed from leadership in the military 49:01 - How Brooke felt ahead of her civilian counterparts, and where she had to work to catch up 51:33 - Final words of wisdom1:24 - Travis' background

70. Travis Collier: The US Coast Guard & Using Sprints to Find Your Passion
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Description:

“It's so unfortunate that veterans don't practice their new life, until they're in their new life. And really by then, you're behind the eight ball. So really any chance you get to take now while you're in uniform - look at it this way: the military is funding you as the R&D project to find the best life and the best way you can serve others. Finding those condensed opportunities to gain that experience, to gain that data. It's really traingulating - you're taking a fix on geography, income, occupation and fit. If it works it works, if it doesn't then you just keep trying something else."
 – Travis Collier

Travis Collier is a Journeyman Marine Inspector with the US Coast Guard, where he has served for the last 15 years. He holds a Bachelors Degree in Government and International Affairs from the US Coast Guard Academy, and a Master’s in Instructional & Performance Technology from Boise State University.
He is the author of the books "Command Your Transition" & “SCALE”, and works as a coach for military members with 8-10 years of service to implement an intent and strategy to transition out the military and achieve even greater success on the outside .

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

Travis' advice of embracing a transition strategy really early in the transition process How to set aside a budget for your own personal Research & Development and use sprints and "takeover weekends" to find your passion An overview on coaching and how it can help veterans reach their full potential How important sales is to any veteran And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Eric's article on Top Talent Book Recommendations: Command Your Transition: Declare your Intent, Craft your Mission, Make it on the Outside, SCALE: Refuse to Settle Recognize What Matters Redefine Success The Personal MBA: Master the Art of Business The 4-Hour Chef: The Simple Path to Cooking Like a Pro, Learning Anything, and Living the Good Life Stanford Ignite Program David Sedaris' essay on the Four Burer Theory Show Notes 1:24 - Travis' background 2:38 - A few curve balls Travis has experienced while in the US Coast Guard 8:15 - Travis' advice of embracing a transition strategy really early in the transition process 12:10 - How to set aside a budget for your own personal Research & Development and use sprints and "takeover weekends" to find your passion 18:42 - Finding the lifestyle to live, serve, and be honored by 26:04 - An overview on coaching and how it can help veterans reach their full potential 32:42 - How important sales is to any veteran 36:16 - Common roadblocks Travis sees for veterans 38:18 - Final words of wisdom

71. Eric Hulbert: Navy Aviation to BofA to the Boston Consulting Group
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“I was under the impression that theres this war for talent out there and everyone is trying to recognize talented individuals. My experience is that companies are looking for a round peg to fit into a round hole, and it doesn't really matter how awesome the peg is; if it doesn't fit exactly they're not interested. It doesn't matter how valuable a jack of all trades is - because they are - a swiss army knife is an incredibly valuable tool. But that doesn't help you get your foot in the door."
 – Eric Hulbert

Eric Hulbert is a Consultant at the Boston Consulting Group in their Atlanta Office. He started out at the Naval Academy, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science in History. After that he served for over 11 years as a pilot, Wing Asst Training Officer, Maritime Watch Officer, and ROTC instructor. After his transition from the military, Eric worked in the Finance Industry at Bank of America - as a Vice Principal of Strategy Analyst. Eric holds an MBA and a Masters of Science in Industrial & Systems Engineering from the University of Florida

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

What life was like balancing active duty as a ROTC instructor, a family, and earning two master's degrees An overview of the Strategy Analyst role at Bank of America How Eric's first salary out of the Navy compared to his Navy salary An overview of the career progression of a Strategy Analyst How Eric approached his second career search compared to his first, and how he decided on Management Consulting What day-to-day life is like at the Boston Consulting Group What sort of experience Eric has had in his first year of consulting, and how to navigate your options within consulting And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Eric's article on Top Talent Book Recommendations: What Color Is Your Parachute? 2017: A Practical Manual for Job-Hunters and Career-Changers Case Interview Secrets: A Former McKinsey Interviewer Reveals How to Get Multiple Job Offers in Consulting Case in Point 9: Complete Case Interview Preparation Top 3 firms mentioned: McKinsey & Co., Bain & Company, Boston Consulting Group (BCG) Other veteran interviews about consulting: Blake Lindsay: Navy to McKinsey & Co. Tom Spahn: Law School, Corporate Law, and Management Consulting Show Notes 1:38 - Eric's background 2:42 - How Eric decided to leave the Navy and how he approached that decision 4:48 - Eric's decision to pursue an advanced degree while still on active duty and the advantages of this approach 6:42 - What life was like balancing active duty as a ROTC instructor, a family, and earning two master's degrees 10:17 - What was most helpful for Eric at grad school in preparing for his civilian career, and what he wishes he had done differently 14:50 - What drew Eric to the Bank of America and the world of finance 16:50 - An overview of the Strategy Analyst role at Bank of America 17:58 - The day-to-day life of a Strategy Analyst 20:34 - Where Eric felt most ahead and behind his civilian counterparts in the first few years of his career 23:15 - How Eric's first salary out of the Navy compared to his Navy salary 25:20 - An overview of the career progression of a Strategy Analyst 27:40 - How Eric approached his second career search compared to his first, and how he decided on Management Consulting 31:06 - Advice on how to better understand oneself and find your ideal career 34:07 - What it was like interviewing for consulting, and advice for those wanting to do the same 38:40 - What day-to-day life is like at the Boston Consulting Group 42:50 - What sort of experience Eric has had in his first year of consulting, and how to navigate your options within consulting 47:58 - Indications that you may love life as a Management Consulting... and signs that you may hate it 49:50 - The most surprising aspect of Eric's transition to a civilian career 52:17 - Final words of wisdom

72. Graham Plaster - Navy to Public Policy & Startups
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“I think that failure is such a scary word to anyone in a large organization, because generally in a large organization - like the military or government - they train you to not discuss failure openly. But in grappling with what you want to do next in life and coming to gips with who you are you need to develop a lot more candor. And you need to develop resiliency. It helped me to really reflect on how much sacrifice will I be willing to make in order to achieve what I want to achieve; and how will i talk about my failures to other people so I can help them."
 – Graham Plaster

Graham Plaster a Senior Adviser at the Defense Language and National Security Education Office. He started out at the Naval Academy, where he received his Bachelors degree in English. After that, he served in the Navy for 11 years as: a Surface Warfare Officer, the Assistant Dean of Students at the Naval War College, a United Nations Liaison Officer, a Foreign Area Officer, and a Navy Staff Officer for the OPNAV Staff. Since his transition to his civilian career he has worked as a consultant, author, editor, founder and advisor in a variety of capacities in the Washington D.C. area

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

How to embrace failure as a way to learn about yourself How to find a community where you can add value and potentially start a business The advantages of juggling multiple projects and how you can more effectively do this How to use LinkedIn as a powerful tool for networking and advancing your career And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode American Corporate Partners - the "best kept secret for veterans" - pro bono organization to connect veterans with senior civilian at Fortune 500 companies Podcast Recommendations Entrepreneur On Fire - with Army Veteran John Lee Dumas This Week in Startups A16Z (Andreesen Horwotiz) 99% Invisible Book Recommendations: Hacking the Job Search: How to escape the rat race of unread résumés and unanswered applications Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear In the Shadow of Greatness: Voices of Leadership, Sacrifice, and Service from America's Longest War LinkedIn Free Premium Account for Veterans Purple Squirrel - buy time by hour of person you're wanting to interview 1000 true fans by Kevin Kelly - a must read for entrepreneurs Show Notes
1:38 - Graham's Background
3:21 - How Graham approached the decision to leave the Navy 5:02 - How Graham considered the Reserves and remained involved 6:44 - An overview of American Corporate Partners - a FREE resource every veteran should consider 9:50 - The most surprising aspect of Graham's transition to civilian life 11:21 - Graham's advice on how to approach a job search 13:22  - Some practical tips and tools to help with increasing your self-knowledge 18:10 - Advice for using LinkedIn effectively for networking 25:27 - How Graham started TheIntelligenceCommunity.com 31:30 - What Graham's startup looks like on a day-to-day basis and what it's like juggling this with a fulltime job 38:30 - Advice for veterans considering starting their own company 40:10 - Advice for those seeking to juggle multiple jobs and side projects at the same time 46:80 - What it's like working at the Defense Language and National Security Education Office 49:40 - Final words of advice

73. Katie Horgan - Marines to Operations at Early-Stage Startups
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“I think that startups - both sides, employers and vets - are a perfect match. If you think about what they ask you to do when you're a Junior Officer... I was a Truck Platoon Commander. They literally dropped me in Iraq and were like 'Go run convoys.' and I was like 'Well... I gotta figure this out.' Anyone that can do that, who has had those junior positions - either on the officer or enlisted side - can absolutely do what it takes to get something done, and quickly analyze the solution, make the best decision you can with 80% of the information or maybe less than that. So that's why I think it's an incredible fit."
 – Katie Horgan

Katie Horgan is a the Senior Director of Operations at Crave Crush - a very interesting New York based Health & Wellness startup. She started out at the University of Southern California, where she earned her Bachelor of Arts in Political Science. After that she served for over six years in the Marine Corps, serving as a Platoon Commander, Company Commander, and Operations Officer, spending time as a convoy commander in Iraq and serving as part of a crisis response force in the pacific theater.  When she transitioned from the military she went to Columbia Business School where she earned her MBA.  From Business school she went to the NY-based startup, Plated, first as their Director of Operations & Logistics, and then as their Senior Director of Operations & Logistics.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

Barriers that veterans encounter when they apply to their first, second, and third job...and how to overcome them What it's like to join a startup going through a period of EXPLOSIVE growth The day-to-day life of a Director of Operations Indications that you may love life at a startup... and signs that you may hate it How Katie's salary at a startup compared to her salary in the military How Katie thinks about a career in Operations and her career progression And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Katie is a Columbia Business School classmate of Taylor Justice (you can check out his interview here) Cameron Brooks recruiting Columbia Business School veterans visitation weekend Crave Crush - a dietary supplement to help you fight those sugar cravings Show Notes 1:48 - Katie's background 2:58 - How Katie approached her decision to leave the Marine Corps 3:38 - How Katie thought about the Reserves and decided not to participate 5:30 - The most surprising aspect of Katie's transition from the military 8:24 - Making the decision to go to school rather than work with recruiters 10:30 - Advice for those considering applying to Columbia Business School (and Business School in general) 12:03 - What Katie liked most and least about her time at Columbia Business School 14:55 - How Katie went about finding her first job after Business School 16:40 - Barriers that veterans encounter when they apply to their first, second, and third job...and how to overcome them 23:20 - Katie does a great job explaining how her background is relevant to a Project Management job 25:00 - What it's like to join a startup going through a period of EXPLOSIVE growth 28:28 - The day-to-day life of a Director of Operations 32:00 - In Katie's first years out of the military how she felt ahead and behind her civilian counterparts 34:15 - Indications that you may love life at a startup... and signs that you may hate it 38:40 - How Katie's salary at a startup compared to her salary in the military 42:30 - An overview on Katie's current company, Crave Crush 46:09 - How Katie thinks about a career in Operations and her career progression 49:50 - Final words of wisdom

74. RaeAnne Pae - Army to Facebook and Business Development
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“I had been given good advice that it didn't matter the first job I did as long as I was learning from it and seeking out opportunities in the first job to be able to figure out what I wanted to do next. And so I went into it with the mindset that I would pick  everyone's brains who I worked with even if not on my team and build these relationships so i could figure out what the next step was."
 – RaeAnne Pae

RaeAnne Pae is a Client Solution Manager at Facebook, where she helps Financial Technology marketers grow their audience and business through Facebook. RaeAnne started out at doing ROTC at Morehead State University, where she earned her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. After that she served for over 7 years in the Army as an Intelligence Officer, where she was awarded the Bronze Star - the military’s fourth-highest individual military award - not once but twice: first for Combat operations in Iraq while assigned to 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division; second for combat operations in southern Afghanistan with assigned to the 2nd Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment of the 101st Airborne Division. When RaeAnne transitioned to a civilian career she started out at the NYSE as an Event Marketing Specialist. She then worked as a Sales & Business Development member first at Tradecraft and then at Addy before joining Facebook.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

Tradecraft and how to get an MBA equivalent experience in 3 months How RaeAnne's transition straight to industry compared with her husband's transition to business school Advice for those applying to Facebook and common veteran paths Two concrete examples of explaining in a veteran background to a Facebook interviewer And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Another interview I did between a husband and wife veteran combo where one went to business school and the other directly to industry are my interviews with Jimmy & Shaunnah interview Tradecraft - 12 week tech immersion program. Tracts include Sales & BD, User Experience, and Growth Another interview that references Coding Academies and other efficient education sources is my interview with Johannes & Maggi on Career Offroading Other programs similar to Tradcraft - GrowthX / Growth Academy Show Notes 1:31 - RaeAnne's background 4:58 - How RaeAnne approached her decision to leave the Army 8:26 - How RaeAnne and her husband approached the Reserves 10:23 - The most surpsing aspects of RaeAnne's transition to civilian life 13:45 - How RaeAnne approached her initial job search 25:38 - An overview of Tradecraft 35:00 - RaeAnne's second job search and how she improved - great advice to all veterans 44:40 - Advice for those applying to Facebook and common veteran paths 47:00 - RaeAnne explains why her background is applicable at Facebook - this is a great example of how veterans could explain their story in an interview 49:33 - RaeAnne explains how her background relates to sales and relationship building 51:45 - How RaeAnne's journey directly to industry compared with her husband's choice to go to business school

75. Lee Haney - Marines to Goldman Sachs and Hewlett Packard Enterprise
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“If you're going to be working that many hours, that means that's how many hours you're learning too. So in the course of one year of working Investment Banking you're effectively getting two years of work that you might get somewhere else, in terms of the shear amount of time you're exposed to these key business problems."
 – Lee Haney

Lee Haney works in Business Operations & Strategy for the COO of Hewlett Packard Enterprise. He graduated in the top 5% of his class at the Naval Academy, and served in the Marine Corps for five years as a Human intelligence Officer, with deployments to both Iraq and Afghanistan. After transitioning out of the military, Lee attended the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business, where he graduated with honors. Since getting his MBA, Lee has worked in the Finance Industry with Goldman Sachs as an Investment Banking Associate, before transitioning to HPE. Lee is also the CFO for Service to School, which regular listeners will remember is the non-profit organization that I have a love affair with - they provide FREE service to any veteran to help you get into your ideal college or grad school program

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

An overview of the Goldman Sachs Veterans Integration Program and why it's such a great fit for any veteran interested in finance An overview of Goldman Sachs and the Investment Banking world The day-to-day life of an Investment Banker What Lee liked most and least about his time as an Investment Banker How Lee made the transition to Hewlett Packard Enterprises And much, much more…
Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode The University of Chicago Booth School of Business Goldman Sachs The Veterans Integration Program @ Goldman Sachs as a pre-MBA experience Other similar programs - http://blog.militarytobusiness.com/2013/08/pre-mba-internships.html Show Notes
1:17 - Lee's Background
2:30 - How Lee decided to leave the military 3:40 - Choosing to not join the Reserves 5:33 - The most surprising aspect of Lee's transition from the Marine Corps 7:58 - An overview of Lee's experience and advice on the Chicago Booth School of Business 17:15 - What drew Lee to the world of finance 20:00 - an overview of the Veterans Integration Program and why it's such a great fit for any veteran interested in finance 22:25 - An overview of Goldman Sachs and the Investment Banking world 24:50 - the day-to-day life of an Investment Banker 32:30 - Signs that you may be well suited for Investment Banking... and signs it may not be the best career option for you 33:59 - Advice on applying to Goldman Sachs 36:00 - What Lee liked most and least about his time as an Investment Banker 39:10 - In what ways Lee felt ahead of his civilian counterparts in Investment Banker, and in what ways he felt like he had to catch up 42:00 - How Lee made the transition to Hewlett Packard Enterprises 45:00 - What Lee's day-to-day life looks like at HPE 47:22 - Advice from Service to School 49:45 - Final words of advice

76. Vic Perez: Submarines to a Wall Street Trader
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“People always said that I was going to take a giant pay cut when I got out of the military and I thought, 'Nah - there's no way, I'm going to go into Wall Street... there's no pay cut.' There is a pay cut! I started off and had no experience in finance so I took an analyst role. And I took a significant pay cut. And I was paying for my own health care and my own taxes... it all adds up."
 – Vic Perez

Vic Perez graduated from the Naval Academy with a BS in Economics with Merit. He served in the Navy for 6 years - first as an officer onboard nuclear submarines as part of the crew of the USS Cheyenne, and after that as an instructor at Notre Dame. While at Notre Dame, Victor somehow found the time to earn his MBA from The University of Chicago Booth School of Business with an emphasis on Finance. Not only did he do that while teaching at Notre Dame…he did it in just two years instead of the traditional 3. Vic now works in the Financial Services Industry with Wells Fargo as part of their new Veteran Internship Program. His current role is as a Credit Derivative Swap Trading Analyst

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

F
And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Finance Book Recommendations: Liar's Poker (Norton Paperback) When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management  Too Big to Fail: The Inside Story of How Wall Street and Washington Fought to Save the Financial System--and Themselves The Black Swan: Second Edition: The Impact of the Highly Improbable: With a new section: "On Robustness and Fragility" (Incerto) Recommended resources The Wall Street Journal The Morning Brew daily email HBX Core (more practice in accounting) Show Notes
1:30 - Vic's Background
2:33 - How Vic decided to leave the military 3:39 - How Vic chose to join the Reserves, and what that experience has been like 5:10 - The most surprising aspect of Vic's transition to civilian life 6:58 - Vic's experience at the Chicago Booth School of Business 9:50 - Advice on applying to Chicago Booth School of Business (or business school in general) 10:57 - day-to-day life of working at Notre Dame and attending the Chicago Booth School of Business 13:21 - what Vic liked most and least about his experience at the Chicago Booth School of Business 14:53 - common paths people take to get into Wall Street 17:52 - An overview of a Trader 23:18 - Signs that you may love life as a Trader... and signs you may hate it 29:04 - Typical career progressions in the world or trading 31:08 - Trading vs Investment Banking 36:40 - The team environment of the Trading role 38:12 - An overview of the Wells Fargo Veterans Internship Program 41:03 - Where Vic felt ahead of his peers based on his military experience, and in what areas he felt behind 41:58 - Advice to those on Active Duty on how to best prepare for their transition 42:55 - Final words of advice

77. John Pontrello - Aviation to HBS and the Oil & Energy Industry
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“A lot of stress goes into the transition and thinking about what's next. Trust in the system that being a high performer and having a positive attitude and getting things done is going to work out. You're going to hit a lot stumbling blocks along the way and face a lot of uncertainty, but if you maintain that positive attitude you're going to be fine."
 – John Pontrello

John Pontrello graduated from the Naval Academy and served for 9 years as a Naval Aviator as part of the Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron. After getting out of the Navy, he attended Harvard Business School. After receiving his MBA from Harvard, he entered the Oil & Energy industry as part of Cameron - a publicly traded company with over 10k employees. John started as a Corporate Development Manager and then progressed to a Plant Manager. John then returned to Harvard, where he is currently earning his Master of Public Administration at their Kennedy School of Government.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

Choosing to go straight to Business School at Harvard Business School rather than to industry
Advice on using the GI Bill
How John decided to enter the Oil & Energy Industry with Cameron
An overview of the Corporate Development Manager
An overview of a Plant Manager
What career progression looks like in the Oil & Energy industry What it's been like at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode GMAT Prep recommendations: Kaplan, Manhattan Prep courses (look for discounts for veterans) Show Notes
1:19 - John’s background
2:06 - John’s decision to leave the Navy
2:58 - Choosing to not join the Reserves
3:32 - The most surprising aspect of John’s transition to civilian life
4:16 - Choosing to go straight to Business School at Harvard Business School rather than to industry
4:57 - Advice on applying to Business School and Harvard Business School in particular
9:03 - What John liked most and least about his time at Harvard Business School
10:30 - Advice on how a veteran might cover their weakness in advance (or as an alternative to business school)
12:13 - Advice on using the GI Bill
13:20 - How John decided to enter the Oil & Energy Industry with Cameron
15:44 - An overview of the Corporate Development Manager
19:25 - In what ways John felt behind his civilian counterparts, and in what ways he felt ahead.
21:50 - An overview of a Plant Manager 24:50 - What career progression looks like in the Oil & Energy industry 30:00 - What are signs that you may enjoy a career in the Oil & Energy industry... and signs that you may not like it 31:30 - What it's been like at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government 33:30 - Final words of wisdom

78. Jason Magone - Marines to a Think Tank to the Department of Veterans Services
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“Because we were in Haiti, our wash-down was in Guantanamo Bay, so I actually did my first call interview from a call center in Guantanamo Bay in Haiti, which led to my first  in person interview the third day I was in New York, which then lead to me starting a month or two later. It was a crazy road and super smooth transition. And part of that was creating my own luck, but a huge part of it was dumb luck too."
 – Ian Folau

Jason Mangone works at the New York City Department of Veterans' Services, where he serves as their Director of Public Private Partnerships and Development. He started out studying Political Science at Boston College and then served as a Platoon Commander in the Marine Corps. After leaving the military he was a Research Associate at the Think Tank, The Council on Foreign Relations for one year, prior to going to Yale for his Master’s in International Relations. After that he joined the Aspen Institute and was their director of The Franklin Project - an initiative to start a national discussion around a year of service for all citizens.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

What it's like to work in a Think Tank Yale and a Masters in International Relations How General Stanley McChrystal led to Jason's work at the Aspen Institute Jason's experience at the Department of Veterans' Services and what he's learned And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode The Council on Foreign Relations Yale - Masters in International Relations The Aspen Institute The New York City Department of Veterans Services Hiring our Heroes - Hiring Our Heroes is a nationwide initiative to help veterans, transitioning service members, and military spouses find meaningful employment opportunities. Skill Bridge (acquired by TopTal) NY Serves Interview References about Service to School Show Notes 1:40 - Jason’s background 3:00 - Jason’s decision to leave the Marine Corps and how he approached that decision 4:19 - How Jason approached the Reserves and his decision not to join the Reserves… and why he may come back 6:44 - The most surprising aspect of Jason’s transition to civilian life 8:50 - An overview of the Council on Foreign Relations, and Think Tanks in general 10:32 - How Jason went about finding his first job and how he ended up at the Council on Foreign Relations 15:38 - Yale and a Masters in International Relations 18:22 - How General Stanley McChrystal led to Jason's work at the Aspen Institute 20:28 - What day-to-day life is like at the Aspen Institute 21:50 - The difference between leadership outside of the military and inside of the military 24:30 - In what ways Jason felt behind his civilian counterparts, and in what ways he felt ahead 28:50 - Jason's experience at the Department of Veterans' Services 34:10 - Advice Jason would want to provide to veterans based on his work in New York 38:45 - Advice on how to find your ideal job 41:50 - Where veterans can find resources to help them in their search for benefits 43:20 - What life is like in the Government Services industry 44:30 - If you're on active duty, steps you can take right now to prepare for your civilian transition 49:50 - Final words of wisdom for veterans

79. Ian Folau - Tactical advice for starting a company (even while on Active Duty)
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“I was able to throw together some website and it was bringing in enough leads that we were able to fill everybody's houses and it just really took off for me. And it was my first venture, and ever since then I was hooked. The idea that I can make more money than my paycheck was exciting for me - the fact that I can provide something that someone will pay even a dollar for motivated me beyond what I could imagine."
 – Ian Folau

Ian Folau is the Co-Founder & CEO of the New York based startup, GitLinks. However, this wasn't Ian's first startup. Ian started founding companies while still on active duty in the Army, where he started his first of multiple startups. Ian studied Systems Engineering at West Point after which he served in the Army in multiple capacities before returning to West Point as an instructor. After departing the Army, he attended Cornell Tech to obtain his MBA, and during which he co-founded his most recent company.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

Steps you can take right now to start your first company (even if you're on Active Duty) Resources you can use to start learning and growing as an entrepreneur Entrepreneurial mistakes that Ian made and what he learned from them, and the importance of failing fast Advice on how to tease out who might be a better Co-Founder What Ian's day-to-day life looked like when he first founded GitLinks How leadership as an entrepreneur differs from military leadership And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Related Interviews: BTU #13 - Taylor Justice: Army to Raising $6M in Funding Book Recommendations: Rich Dad Poor Dad: What The Rich Teach Their Kids About Money That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! Traction: How Any Startup Can Achieve Explosive Customer Growth The 4-Hour Workweek: Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich Podcast Recommendations: Entrepreneur On Fire Smart Passive Income The Tim Ferriss Show Tech MBA Programs referenced: Cornell Tech University of Washington Technology Management MBA UT Austin Show Notes 1:39 - Ian’s background 2:40 - Ian's decision to leave the Army 6:26 - Deciding to not pursue the Reserves 7:20 - The most surprising aspect of Ian's transition to civilian life ** 9:39 - Ian does a fantastic job of explaining his background in a way that is relevant to the listener. This comes up time and time again in interviews as a really crucial skill 12:45 - Advice on how to better explain a veterans history to a civilian 15:10 - Ian's experience starting companies while in the Army and how he got started 21:30 - Resources to consider to help in your own entrepreneurial journey 28:11 - Entrepreneurial mistakes that Ian made and what he learned from them, and the importance of failing fast 33:10 - Advice on how to tease out who might be a better Co-Founder 38:52 - Cornell Tech, and how it supports entrepreneurs 40:52 - Advice on applying to Cornell Tech, and other programs to consider 43:10 - An overview on Ian's current company, GitLinks 46:15 - What Ian's day-to-day life looked like when he first founded GitLinks 48:56 - How leadership as an entrepreneur differs from military leadership 51:19 - Actions you can take right now to start an entrepreneurial journey (even while on Active Duty) 53:19 - Final words of wisdom

80. Tony Zamora: Electronics Technician to Human Resources
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Description:

“Something that was surprising [about the transition to civilian life] is that not everything is really laid out for you. In the military a lot of things are laid out for you; you go through specific trainings and checklists, you have a criteria on how you’re going to grow your career and take the test to advance and everything is defined by points and very structured in the military. When you get out, it’s nothing like that. You’re as successful on the outside as you want to be. you have to be hungry for those opportunities and seek them, because nothing is really laid out for you."
 – Tony Zamora

Tony Zamora is the Director of Human Resources at Ipsos, a company with over 17,000 worldwide employees. Tony started out as an Electronics Tech in the US Navy, and also served as an Electronics Repair Technician in the Coast Guard. He has worked in Human Resources roles at the Sierra Nevada Corporation and The San Jose Group.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

An overview of Human Resources and why you might find it appealing What it’s like to be a Director of Human Resources, and what day-to-day life looks like Common mistakes that veterans make in their transition and job search How to improve your resume What someone on active duty can do right now to start preparing for their transition to a civilian career And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Show Notes 1:20 - Tony’s background 2:25 - Tony’s decision to leave the military and how he approached it 3:31 - How Tony researched what he wanted to do outside of the military 5:41 - An overview of Human Resources and what appealed to Tony about this career 7:01 - What it’s like to be a Director of Human Resources, and what day-to-day life looks like 11:10 - In what ways Tony felt ahead of his peers in Human Resources, and where he had to catch up based on his military service 13:07 - What was most surprising to Tony about his transition to civilian life 14:40 - Advice to veterans based on Tony’s experience in Human Resources (HR) 16:35 - The best advice Tony received about how to transition to a civilian career 17:40 - Advice on how to network 21:45 - Common mistakes that veterans make in their transition and job search 22:16 - How to improve your resume 23:50 - What someone on active duty can do right now to start preparing for their transition to a civilian career 27:35 - Final words of advice to veterans

81. BTU #19 - Veteran Sales Hacks (a 5 Min Video About Networking)
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For the podcast, while I normally interview veterans about their civilian career, today I wanted to mix things up. One of the recurring themes of my show has been the importance of networking. Today, I take you through a 5  minute video overview of powerful - and free - tools you can use to take your networking and outreach to the next level.

Related Links:

LinkedIn for Veterans - a must have tool for everyone in the galaxy Rapportive - Provides social profile info for emails, and is helpful at guessing emails for cold outreach Boomerang - lots of helpful tools here, but the one I reference is reminding you if the person you email does not respond within a set time period Assistant.to - cut down on all the back and forth of scheduling with Assistant.to; it's like having a virtual assistant, but for free Beyondtheuniform_email_help_for_veterans - a free excel spreadsheet that will help you identify the top 9 most common email formats

82. Tom Wolfe - Everything you need to know to plan your transition
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"Open your eyes, be receptive, try to learn about what's unknown to you, in addition to what you're already aware of."
– Tom Wolfe

Tom Wolfe is a career coach, author, and columnist. He is the author of OUT OF UNIFORM -- Your Guide to a Successful Military-to-Civilian Transition, as well as a columnist of 11 years for CivilianJobs.com. Tom has over 29 years of experience in the Career Development industry. Tom is a graduate of the US Naval Academy, and served as a Surface Warfare Officer and Admiral’s Aide.

In this interview we discuss:

Stereotypes about veterans - how to use stories in interviews to reinforce the positive ones, and preemptively combat the negative ones Common mistakes veterans make - like being too humble or understated in an interview Job hunting techniques (like using informational interviews to see if you’d like a career and potentially get your foot in the door of an organization) Using Filters for your job search so you can avoid boiling the ocean when looking for your ideal job Using a career coach as a personal trainer for your career Tactical exercises you can use to improve your self knowledge as part of a job search And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Tom's book: Our of Uniform Contact Tom at: http://www.tomwolfe-careercoach.com/index.html Tom's book's website: http://www.out-of-uniform.com Canines for Service: http://www.caninesforservice.org/ Show Notes
[3:10] - Tom’s background in writing and career coaching
[4:10] - The most common mistakes Tom sees veterans make in their career transition
[13:27] - Stereotypes - how to reinforce the positives and preempt the negatives
[24:26] Reasons why veterans get rejected in interviews
[27:00] - A surefire way to succeed in an interview
[28:33] - How to gather information about what you want to do as efficiently as possible
[33:18] - Using Informational Interviews to figure out what you want to do… and potentially get your foot in the door
[36:12] - How to use filters to simplify your job search
[43:20] - 1/2 of veterans end up working for a company they weren’t aware of at the start of their search..how to broaden your search to be aware of broader opportunities
[47:50] - A personal trainer for your career - Career Coaching
[57:03] - Using mistakes to learn in you job search
[58:32] - Where you can learn more about Tom’s work


83. Maggi & Johannes - Career Off-roading
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This episode is a break from my normal format - rather than interview a veteran about their civilian career, I interview TWO veterans about their advice based on their work in helping other veterans. This episode is FULL of helpful hints, resources, and recommendations that would benefit any veteran.

In this interview I meet with Johannes Schonberg and Maggi Melina. Johannes enlisted in the navy as a Nuclear Machinist Mate, before attending the Naval Academy with a degree in English. He served as a Surface Warfare Officer in San Diego for five years before transitioning to civilian life. He has done work in Politics and as a consultant, helping companies like T-Mobile and Facebook hire veterans. Maggi Air Force ground radar systems journeyman, deploying to Kuwait. After her transition, she completed her bachelors degree, went to law school, and worked as a lawyer for seven years. After practicing law, she worked in politics, as an electrician, and then as a founder of a startup.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

Practical tips and tools to use as a veteran to help in your networking Coding academies and other efficient resources to help educate you for a specific job What companies like Facebook and T-Mobile look for in veterans And much, much more...

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Operation Code- mentor people to learn new tech skill set LinkedIn Premium Account Education sources to consider: EdX, Coursera (Promotion for Veterans), Salesforce for Veterans (VetForce), udemyKhan Academy,  Udacity, Continuing education at community college Events to consider - Startup Weekend; Seattle Tech list serv, MeetUp.com, Lean Startup, Veterans on Wall Street, Military Conferences, Academy Conferences Code Schools to consider: Code Fellows, Operation Code (list of code schools that take the GI Bill) Glass Door - there's a lot of salary info here. I recommend you use them to see the earning potential of graduates from a program; before you invest money in an education, know the concrete numbers you can expect to make on the other side American Corporate Partners - connects military personnel with a senior level civilian to be your mentor Deliotte Core Leadership Program - helps veterans build an elevator pitch and build their personal brand Vet Tech Trek - go from tech companies around SF and NY and finance The Commit Foundation - creates tailored transition solutions for top Veteran talent and are reaching Veterans across the nation through our small touch, high impact workshops and 1-on-1 transition assistance programs. Upwork - freelance site; could use to build skills Top skills for 2015 - what skills are most valuable that year To consider while on Active Duty - The Defense Innovation Initiative; the Navy Innovation Advisory; Hacking for Defense (H4D)Defense Entrepreneurs Forumhttp://seattletechstartups.com/ To Contact Maggi - OperationCode.Org's Slack Channel (Direct Message @Maggi) Johannes' work at Bunker Labs - free resource, overview of what entrepreneurship looks like Afina project, defense entrepreneurship forum Show Notes 1:30 Intro and background info Johannes and Maggi 7:12 What people on active duty may not understand about civilian life. 12:30 What is “networking” and advice for veterans about how to get started 17:10 Education - taking a proactive and efficient approach to education, and specific resources to consider 21:00 How a veteran might approach “networking” in a way that is more authentic and natural to them 23:26 A few other resources to consider for education 25:20 Common mistakes that veterans make in their transition to civilian life 29:50 An overview of Code Schools and Coding Academies 34:58 What veterans should know about applying to companies like Facebook and T-Mobile 43:40 Other advice and words of wisdom for veterans

84. John Vardaman: Construction, Project Management, and Tesla
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“And I think sometimes that was hard to admit to ourselves and to others in the military: it was a little scary looking out there at the job market and trying to figure out how am I going to make this work and make this happen? It is not that bad - and I would encourage folks to be confident in themselves and their skills. You've been equipped with the skills to land pretty much any job out there."
 – John Vardaman

John Vardaman is a Senior Construction Manager at Tesla. He started his career in the Construction Industry at DPR Construction, where he served as a Project Manager. While at DPR Construction, he earned his Masters in Sustainable Design and Construction at Stanford University. In the military, John served as a Human Intelligence Officer in the Marine Corps, and graduated from the US Naval Academy.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

How John used multiple recruiters over the course of a year to find his ideal job What it's like to be a Project Manager, and how the military prepares you for this role The benefits of pursuing advanced education once you have civilian working experience How to explain your background to an employer in terms that will resonate with them How to approach the job search with confidence and humility
And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode DPR Construction John mentions working with three recruiting groups, one of which is the Lucas Group Show Notes
[2:00] John's Background
[2:48] Making the decision to leave the Marine Corps [4:54] Evaluating whether or not to join the Reserves [6:30] Choosing his first job, and working with Recruiters (and the pros and cons of Recruiters) [9:18] Starting to work with Recruiters one year from separation and the advantages of more time for interviews [12:30] What drew John to Construction and Project Management ** [13:20] John does an amazing job explaining his past as it would help in a Project Management role. I thought this was a great, tangible example of how to sell your background for ones desired role [16:20] John explains how he would explain his military background in a Project Management role [19:27] Day-to-day life of a Project Manager in the Construction industry [22:40] Where John felt ahead of his peers based on his military service... and where he felt behind [25:48] The most surprising aspect of John's transition to life as a civilian [31:23] How leadership outside of the military differs from leadership in the military [34:18] Pursuing a Master's at Stanford while working, and how John benefited from having experience before pursuing advanced education [39:37] John's experience working at Tesla, and how great it is to work at a company aligned with your values [44:44] Final words of advice for military personnel and other veterans

85. Tom Spahn: Law School, Corporate Law, and Management Consulting
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"We underestimate the incredible experience and leadership skills that we bring to the table, and I think that veterans don't appreciate the magnitude of it when they're in the thick of it."
– Tom Spahn

Tom Spahn has spent time in his civilian career as both a Corporate Lawyer at Sullivan & Cromwell, as well as a Management Consultant at McKinsey & Co. He has a collection of degrees - he received his JD from Stanford Law School while also obtaining MS in Management Science & Engineering at Stanford at the same time. He also holds a Masters in Engineering Management from Old Dominion University. Tom graduated from the Naval Academy, served on submarines with the crew of the USS Chicago (SSN 721).

In this interview we discuss:

Why Tom chose to remain in the Navy Reserves Advice for veterans considering Law School What day-to-day life is like as a Corporate Lawyer and as a Management Consultant What the typical career path looks like for both Corporate Lawyers and Management Consultants How the military prepared him for Corporate Law work... and where he had to catch up What it's like to interview for a Management Consulting firm Signs that you may like a career in Management Consulting... and indications that you might not enjoy it And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Kaplan Law School prep Show Notes [1:44] - Background [3:22] - Deciding to leave the Navy [4:08] - Choosing to remain in the Reserves [6:37] - Choosing to get another Master's Degree, and choosing Law School [8:12] - How the military prepared him for Law School... and where he had to catch up [10:45] - Advice for those considering Law School [12:15] - Why Tom chose Corporate Law [14:31] - Applying to Law School, and applying to a Corporate Law Firm [19:15] - Day-to-day life as a Corporate Lawyer [23:00] - How the military prepared him for Corporate Law work... and where he had to catch up [23:47] - What a typical career path looks like for a Corporate Lawyer [25:40] - Choosing to switch to Management Consulting [27:10] - What it's like to interview for a Management Consulting firm [32:45] - Day-to-day life as a Management Consultant [37:43] - What a typical career path looks like for a Management Consultant [41:18] - Signs that you may like a career in Management Consulting... and indications that you might not enjoy it [46:34] - The biggest surprise about the transition to civilian life [48:18] - Don't sell yourself short as a veteran

86. Noel Gonzalez: Starting 3 Companies While on Active Duty
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"I think military people assume that when they get out the military their skills and abilities are going to put them in a job that is paying them more than when they were in the military. I think that's a misconception - once they get out they have to realize they have to prove themselves again. That could take one month or four jobs, but you have to realize that your'e starting fresh."
– Noel Gonzalez

Noel Gonzalez - grew up in Cuba, emigrated to the United States, and eventually became the Commanding Officer of the USS Cheyenne (SSN 773), where he was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal. While on Active Duty, Noel founded three different startups. The most recent - and one we discuss most during the interview - is a company built to help Veterans in their transition to civilian life (SkillMil). In this interview we discuss:

The mistakes Noel made and learned from in starting his first two companies Steps that active duty military personnel can do right now to fill in their business knowledge gaps What day-to-day life is like as an entrepreneur The importance of mentors and coaches as part of the transition process How leadership outside of the military differs from leadership within the military And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Stanford Ignite - also there is a Veterans Ignite every summer Sloan MIT Online Courses - all online courses, easy to understand SkillMil - help veterans translate their experience in the military to employers in the civilian world SRI International - helping make lives healthier, better, and more productive Jimmy Sopko interview - I reference this as an example of a veteran who rolled up his sleeves, took a pay cut, and worked his way up in an organization Show Notes [2:15] - From Cuba to Commanding Officer of the USS Cheyenne, Noel's background [4:13] - The mistakes Noel made and learned from in starting his first two companies [5:42] - Where Noel felt he was most behind his civilian counterparts in starting a company [7:02] - Advice on ways to fill in business knowledge gaps while in the military [10:37] - How Noel started his third company, SkillMil [12:28] - How SkillMil helps veterans [17:48] - What day-to-day life is like as an entrepreneur [20:55] - Common misconceptions about civilian life [25:00] - The importance of mentors and coaches as part of the transition process [27:21] - How leadership outside of the military differs from leadership within the military [28:24] - Final advice to those on active duty

 

 



87. Taylor Justice: Army to Raising $6M in Funding
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“As you start to make this transition, -asking for advice is the smart move. Thinking that you have everything figured out or that you're going to be bothering someone learning about what they're doing that's the fool's road. I would urge people to not be scared of reaching out to people - if you don't, you're hurting yourself."
 – Taylor Justice

Taylor Justice is the Co-Founder and Chief Business Officer at Unite Us, a start-up that connects citizens with local coordinated services. Based in New York, Unite Us has raised over $6M in venture funding, and over 20 employees. After attending the U.S. Military Academy and serving for over a year as an Infantry Officer in the Army, Taylor was unexpectedly military disqualified from the Army. He faced his transition to civilian life years before he expected it, with no peers or classmates from whom to seek advice. Through a meticulous approach to reaching out to others, Taylor landed his first job in the Medical Devices industry, and then transitioned to the world of tech. While attending Columbia Business School he met his co-founder, and launched Unite Us.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

An unexpected departure from the Army, and navigating a career search before his peers Using a systematic email process to gain information and his first job The advantages of client support functional roles and sales roles What it's like to start and grow a startup Advice for other veterans seeking to start their own business Not being afraid to ask advice from anyone and everyone as a means of learning And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Higher Echelon Columbia Business School Unite Us Show Notes
[1:38] Background
[2:40] An unexpected separation from the Army [8:40] The most helpful resources in his initial job search [14:07] Advice for structuring an outreach process as part of a job search [15:48] How the military most prepared and least prepared him for an Account Executive and Sales role [18:50] The starting point of founding Unite Us [22:25] Advice on finding and vetting a potential co-founder [24:15] Whether to gain experience prior to starting a company, or do it straight out of the military [29:12] The day-to-day life of starting a company [33:30] Common misconceptions that military personnel have about starting a company [38:25] How military personnel can benefit from Unite Us [44:05] Biggest advice - don't be afraid to ask for help

 



88. Tim Avery: Consulting, the PhD Process, and Self-Knoweldge
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Timothy Avery faced his transition to civilian life much earlier than anticipated, and found himself - far ahead of his peer set - having to decide what to do. Initially, he found his way to Management Consulting, where he worked with both BearingPoint and Booz Allen Hamilton. However, after further consideration, he navigated his way to a doctoral program in clinical psychology (i.e., Doctorate of Psychology, or PsyD). In all my interviews, one of the most commonly cited pieces of advice from veterans is to make sure that "you know yourself as you prepare for your job search." Tim does an exceptional job of breaking down practical ways in which you can do this.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

How Tim unexpectedly found himself transitioning to civilian life...twice An overview of the Management Consulting industry and the key players What day-to-day life is like as a consultant How he transitioned into a PsyD/PhD program What day-to-day life is like as a PsyD student His advice for how to better understand what will make you happy And much, much more… Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking hereand choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode

Recruiters Mentioned: The Lucas Group, Cameron-Brooks Consulting Firms mentioned: Ernst & Young (EY), Deloitte, KPMG, McKinsey & Co., Bain & Co., Boston Consulting Group, Booz Allen Hamilton Book recommendation: What Color is Your Parachute American Psychology Association conference The Yellow Ribbon Program If any veteran ever feels in distress, please call:800-273-TALK, 1 if military / veteran Can text as well

Show Notes

[2:23] Background [3:58] An unexpected transition to civilian life...twice [5:45] How the Consulting industry supported the Naval Reserves [8:34] Researching possible careers and deciding on Management Consulting [13:25] Management Consulting firms where Veterans should consider applying [15:53] A day in the life of a consultant [21:18] Travel and Consulting Work [22:29] How life compared between BearingPoint and Booz Allen Hamilton [22:59] Switching to advanced education in Psychology [27:47] The process of starting a PsyD/PhD [33:15] Planning ahead for transitions...they take longer than you'd think [36:40] A day in the life of a PsyD student [40:50] Advice for increasing self-knowledge as you approach your job search [52:50] Advice for all veterans

 



89. Alex Chivers: College at Dartmouth & Investment Banking
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“Being able to work with deadlines and under pressure, attention to detail...these little things add up dramatically to put you in a position to do well [in the Civilian world]."
 – Alex Chivers

Alex Chivers served as a Non-Commissioned Officer in the US Army, where was part of the elite Army Rangers. During his time in the Army, Alex deployed multiple times to Afghanistan as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. After leaving the Army, Alex was accepted to Dartmouth College, routinely ranked as one of the top ten colleges in the country. While at Dartmouth, Alex held internships in the Investment Banking world with both Barclays and Perella Weinberg Partners, as well as an internship at the US House of Representatives. Alex has also worked as an Ambassador for Service 2 School, helping other veterans get into college.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

His decision to leave the Army. How a conversation on Reddit helped him get into Dartmouth His work with Service 2 School, and advice on applying to college Common mistakes he sees veterans make in their transition to civilian life An overview of the Investment Banking world And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Service 2 School - FREE coaching for any military veterans to get into your ideal undergrad or graduate institution Veritas Prep Complete GMAT Course Set - 12 Books Complete GMAT Strategy Guide Set (Manhattan Prep GMAT Strategy Guides) Service 2 school's MBA application guide American Corporate Partners: free assistance to pair veterans with someone in a desired career field Show Notes
[2:10] Army Rangers, Darthmouth, and Alex's background
[3:10] Deciding to leave the Army [4:31] How far in advance Alex started to plan [6:35] Deciding between college vs. straight to industry [7:45] Preparing financially for the transition to civilian life [9:55] How Alex get into Dartmouth [13:10] How a Reddit forum helped him get into college [15:35] Advice for college applications [18:36] Common misconceptions Alex sees when people are applying to college and transitioning to civilian life [23:15] How the Army put Alex ahead... and where he felt behind his classmates [27:20] Additional resources to consider [28:31] Interning in the Investment Banking world [30:50] Interning at the US House of Representatives [32:22] What's next for Alex after Dartmouth [35:30] Final advice to those on Active Duty

90. David Lee: Marines to Stanford Business School
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“In terms of the highest tangible ROI, an MBA is hard to beat as a veteran, especially for someone like me coming from a non-technical background."
 – David Lee

David Lee will be attending the Stanford Graduate School of Business next September after over six years of service in the US Marine Corps. He has served as the Director of MBA and Other Graduate Programs at Service 2 School, a free resource to help veterans get into their dream education program. As a result, he has's got a wealth of knowledge for veterans considering going to school once they get out of the military. A NROTC graduate of the University of Michigan, David was academically #1 of 600 at the Officer Candidate School.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

His decision to leave the Marine Corps Analyzing grad school problems, their fit, and potential return How Service 2 School provided free help in his application process Surprises in the grad school admission process Advice to those considering applying to schools once they leave the military And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Service 2 School - FREE coaching for any military veterans to get into your ideal undergrad or graduate institution Veritas Prep Complete GMAT Course Set - 12 Books Complete GMAT Strategy Guide Set (Manhattan Prep GMAT Strategy Guides) Service 2 school's MBA application guide Warrior Scholar Project - Immersive one and two week academic workshops or "bootcamps" provided free of charge to enlisted veterans and held at some of America's top colleges and universities. Four Block - Military veteran resources Breakline - career transition resources for veterans interested in Tech The Honor Foundation:  Transition Readiness Institute created exclusively for Navy SEALs and the U.S. Special Operations community. Stanford ignite - social entrepreneruship program for post 9/11 veterans Show Notes
[1:50] Background
[3:00] Making the decision to leave the military [4:30] Researching potential options [5:50] Choosing to remain in the Reserves [6:30] Choosing graduate school as a means to shortcut impact [8:30] Service 2 School and how they can help with college & grad school admission [9:54] Surprising in the MBA application process [11:10] Choosing schools for application...and which to accept [11:50] Advice on the application process [13:45] A timeline for applying to business schools [15:00] Resources for GMAT preparation [15:35] Life while applying to grad school [16:30] Extracurricular activities while on active duty [17:45] What he's learned from working at Service 2 School [19:15] Common veteran questions and misconceptions about grad school [22:45] Final words of advice

 

 



91. Will Grannis: Boeing, Google, Startups and More
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“Asking for help sometimes for some people implies weakness. If there's one thing I did that was semi-smart it was realizing that I wasn't going to be able to do it on my own and asking for help from those who were closest to me and had the most vested interest in my success."
 – Will Grannis

Will Grannis is the Managing Director of the Cloud CTO Office at Google. Since his time as an officer in the Army, he's had an incredible career prior to Google, including: Founding a company that was acquired after just two years; serving as the Chief Technology Officer for L-3 Communications, a company with over 38,000 employees worldwide; leading Boeing's Advanced Information Solutions team.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

His decision to leave the Army. How he leveraged his closest relationships to land his first civilian job How the Army most prepared him for his first job, and where he had to catch up to his peers How overhearing a conversation in an adjacent cubicle changed his career The advantages of working in a small office environment How valuable industry experience is prior to pursuing an advanced degree What it's like to work through the first part of a week, hop on a plane and attend grad school, fly back home and start the whole cycle over again And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Comtech Mobile Datacom Corporation Boeing Wharton Executive MBA Program Show Notes
[1:45] Background info
[3:04] Approaching the decision to leave the Army [5:40] Active duty to IRR... and then to the Reserves [7:51] The Telecom industry and a role as Program Manager [10:19] How Will approached his job start when he first left the Army [14:38] Day-to-day life in Will's first civilian job in the Telecom Industry, and why small companies are so valuable for veterans [20:58] How the Army was a competitive advantage for Will... and where he had to catch up [22:52] The biggest surprise Will faced when he transitioned to civilian life [25:35] Making the transition to Boeing after one year as a civilian [32:31] Pursuing an MBA at Wharton while working at Boeing [36:15] How to consider grad school or straight to industry and what degree to pursue [38:48] Final advice to anyone on Active Duty

 

 



92. Tim Hsia: Boost Your Acceptance Rate to College & Grad School
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Description:

“Service 2 School is a free service for Veterans; we pair you with someone from your background...and in order to get into best school possible for you, we help you TRAIN: that's taking you through Test prep, Resume review, Application & essay assistance, Interviewing and Networking."
 – Tim Hsia

Of every interview I've done so far, this it the one I would most recommend to every single military veteran - enlisted and officer. Tim Hsia received his JD and MBA from Stanford after serving as a Captain in the US Army. While at Stanford, Tim co-founded two companies; one sold to the Stanford Daily, and the second is still in operation. This organization - Service 2 School - is a free resource for all veterans to help them get into the best school (college or grad school) for them.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

His decision to leave the US Army Why he chose to get two degrees at the same time, and which one he would recommend to other veterans The power of internships to help you find your ideal job How Service 2 School will help you find the right school for you and get in Common misconceptions he sees in veterans when considering schools What his time in the Venture Capital Industry was like And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Service 2 School - FREE coaching for any military veterans to get into your ideal undergrad or graduate institution Service 2 school's MBA application guide Show Notes
[1:54] Background
[3:38] Choosing to leave the Army [5:18] Choosing a JD / MBA instead of directly to Industry [11:45] Getting an internship if you don't go to grad school [14:55] Taking a long-term view on your career [19:20] Starting Service 2 School to help veterans with college & grad school applications [24:45] How Service 2 School is the best free resource for Veterans on earth [31:57] Most common mistakes / misconceptions that military personnel have in their transition [36:45] Advice on whether or not to pursue education after transition from the military [39:43] Considering an Executive Education Program vs. a Traditional Program [42:11] An overview on Venture Capital from Tim's internship experience [47:00] The most surprising aspect about the transition from military life

 

 



93. Shaunnah Sopko: Project & Program Management
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“You can do an internship - not just through grad school - as a way to dip your toe in the water to see how you like that type of role and company. It’s a great way to give yourself that reflection time period if you’r not going to go to a grad school program."
 – Shaunnah Sopko

Shaunnah Sopko is a Product Quality Program Manager at Nest. She holds an MBA from the Stanford Graduate School of Business, an MS in Systems Engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School, and a BS in Systems Engineering from the US Naval Academy. Shaunnah served six years as an officer in the Surface Warfare community, where she served on the USS Shoup (DDG 86), Destroyer Squadron 9, and as the Flag Aide to the Superintendent of the US Naval Academy.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

Her decision to leave the Navy Joining the Reserves through grad school and at work Advice for Business School appliations How the military prepared her for graduate school…and where she had to catch up
 
Overview of Product & Program Management
Advice for Active Duty military personnel who want to pursue a career in Product & Program Management
Recommended resources to prepare for your transition
And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. [UPDATE WHEN LIVE] Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Show Notes
[1:20] Background
[3:15] - Weighing options on leaving the Navy
[5:50] - Joining the Reserves through grad school and at work
[7:15] - How Shaunnah’s company accommodated her Reserves time[10:10] - Pursuing a second master’s degree
[11:24]  - Advice for Business School appliations
[14:35] - How the military prepared her for graduate school…and where she had to catch up
[18:07] - Overview of Product & Program Management
[21:15] - Advice for Active Duty military personnel who want to pursue a career in Product & Program Management
[24:52] - Interning at Apple
[28:08] - Choosing Nest
[29:38] - Advice for preparing for an interview
[32:07] - Day-to-Day life as a Program Manager
[40:33] - How the military prepared her for Program Management…and where she had to catch up
[42:35] - Recommended resources to prepare for your transition
[46:45] - Final advice for transition


94. Jimmy Sopko: Active Duty to Pinterest & High Tech
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“Be open to the fact that you don't know what you don't know. Be willing to reach out and ask people what they do, what they like and don't like...be open to just learning and figuring out what's important to you and try to find a company that's right for you."
 – Jimmy Sopko

Jimmy Sopko is a Manager of Growth Sales at Pinterest. Jimmy got his start at Pinterest by rolling up his sleeves and taking a job at Pinterest as part of their Community Operations team. While this was a step back in terms of pay and seniority, it got his foot in the door and he was able to quickly work his way up within Pinterest... a company that has already tripled in growth since he joined. Jimmy is a graduate of the US Naval Academy, and former Surface Warfare Officer. He's also an avid rower, having earned a Silver Medal in the 2009 World Rowing Championships.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

The three approaches Jimmy took to get his first job (Recruiters, Networking, Mentors)
The importance of choosing a lifestyle NOT a specific role at a company
How he narrowed his job search down to the Technology industry and Pinterest What it's like to join an internet rocket ship... at the very bottom Why he thinks it may be better to skip grad school and going straight to industry The difference between military leadership and Tech leadership How customer-facing roles maximize your learning inside a company And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory Pinterest US Rowing Team Military LinkedIn network: iSABRD The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics How to Get Hired at Google - Cracking the Tech Career: Insider Advice on Landing a Job at Google, Microsoft, Apple, or any Top Tech Company Show Notes
[1:30] Background
[2:40] Transition from the Navy to US Rowing Team and searching for a new career
[4:10] Three approaches to getting his first job (Recruiters, Networking, Mentors)
[6:38] Approaching the decision to leave the military
[8:40] Choosing to not join the Reserves
[10:55] The importance of choosing a lifestyle NOT a specific role [11:55] Deciding to leave the US Rowing Team and enter industry [12:53] Exploring career possibilities while rowing [14:10] Narrowing a job search down to the Technology industry and Pinterest  [16:30] Joining a rocket ship... at the very bottom [17:57] Advice for skipping grad school and going straight to industry [23:40] The difference between military leadership and Tech leadership [26:50] How customer-facing roles maximize your learning inside a company [27:52] Day-to-day life of a Community Operations / Customer Support roles [30:00] Managing in an organization (vs. in the military) [32:05] Day-to-day life in Growth Sales capacity [36:50] Advice to those currently on Active Duty

 



95. Bobby Farina: Financial Services and Finding the Right Path for You
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“There is an insatiable appetite [at top tier business schools]... at these schools for people who have real leadership backgrounds, and they view the military as an incubator for that."
 – Bobby Farina

Bobby Farina is a Partner at Sixpoint Ventures, after having spent over 10 years in the Financial Services industry. Bobby attended the US Air Force Academy, where he studied Management, prior to entering the intelligence community as an Information Security Specialist. Although he obtained his MS in in Information Security at Johns Hopkins University while on Active Duty, he chose to attend Columbia Business School after he separated from the Air Force.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

His decision to leave the Air Force, and how he thought about the Reserves Using grad school while in the military to offset a low GPA from undergrad and boost grad school admission chances Considering the opportunity cost of pursuing a master's degree vs. entering industry right away Recommendations for schools focusing on finance and advice on how to get in A breakdown of the Financial Services industry and where veterans fit in How to get your first job in Financial Services What you may end up missing from the military And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.” NEW: Watch on YouTube here:

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode McConnel Air Force Base Management Major at Air Force (mini-MBA) Network Security USAF Melissa / I love you Virus Intelligence agencies: Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), National Security Agency (NSA), National Reconnaisance Office (NRO), Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) JWIX intelligence network Air Force recruiting - ALO - Admissions Liason Officer Johns Hopkins MS in Information Security Cyber Security jobs referenced: Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), General Dynamics, Lockheed Martin Top Tier Business Schools for Finance: University of Chicago (Booth School of Business), Wharton School of Business, Columbia Business School, Darden at University of Virginia, MIT Sloan School of Business Bank of America & Evercore Financial Services: Investment Banking, Sales and Trading, Private Wealth Management (PWM), Private Equity, Hedge Funds Sales Side Institutions Points of Conversation: JP Morgan, State Street, Wellington Show Notes [0:22] - Personal, USAFA and Air Force background [6:54] - Decision to leave the Air Force [9:54] - Considering Air Force Reserves [12:12] - Air Force Reserves while in Financial Services [13:04] - Doing grad school while on active duty [16:50] - using post college work to boost your GPA if you have a lower college GPA [19:42] - deciding on a second master's degree and an MBA [21:00] - Choosing Columbia as business school and application process [21:53] - Recommendations for Top Tier Business Schools focusing on Finance [23:40] - Balancing Applications to business school & general advice [26:25] - Finding the right school for you [28:30] - Getting the most out of grad school but knowing your intended industry [31:00] - Overview of the Financial Services Industry [35:45] - Why Financial Services companies love veterans [37:45] - What traits they most prize in veteran applicants [41:10] - Advice for someone who wants to enter Financial Services industry [44:05] - Biggest surprise in transitioning to civilian world

96. Brad Bonney - Business School, Confidence, and a Startup Rollercoaster with 3X Growth
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“What I didn't know [when I was first getting out of the Navy] was how prepared and equipped veterans are as they're transitioning for an unbelievable number of roles within corporate america.”

– Brad Bonney

Brad Bonney grew up in Kansas City and in 8th Grade decided to attend the Naval Academy. He graduated from USNA in '05, went to Stanford University to get his MS in Electrical Engineering, and then joined the submarine pipeline. After five years of service on the USS Jefferson City, he left the Navy to attend the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

After graduating from Stanford (for the second time), Brad joined AirBnB as one of their first thousand employees. Since then, he has seen the company triple in size, as he serves as a manager on their Trust & Safety team (with over 200 employees).

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

His decision to leave the Navy, and how he thought about the Reserves How he decided to go back to grad school again Advice on applying to a top tier business school Thoughts about Executive Education programs How he decided to join AirBnB, and how he got his foot in the door What is day-to-day life like at a high-growth internet startup What has been the most surprising aspect of civilian life And much, much more…

 

Listen to it on iTunes. Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.” NEW: Watch on video on YouTube here:

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode Trident Scholar Program Stanford Master in Electrical Engineering USS Jefferson City (SSN 759) Stanford Graduate School of Business application Veterans club for Harvard Business School and Stanford GSB UCLA Executive MBA Airbnb Other sharing economy companies: TaskRabbit, Lyft, Postmates Goldman Sachs Stanford Career Life Visioning Show Notes [3:03] - Personal, USNA and Navy background [3:35] - Stanford MS experience [4:23] - Decision to transition from the Navy [5:08] - Decision process for not joining the Navy Reserves [5:55] - Deciding to get another degree [7:20] - Choosing Business School over other grad programs [8:23] - Why Stanford & the application process, how to evaluate the value of business school [9:45] - Advice for applying to Stanford (and Business School in general) and what not to do [12:10] - Advice to active duty military thinking of applying to Business School in several years [13:40] - considering Executive Education vs. Full Time grad school [15:08] - Understanding what you're buying with an MBA experience [15:48] - AirBnB description & joining a high-growth startup [17:43] - What day-to-day job looks like [19:13] - Team size and composition [19:48] - Travel [21:10] - Hours [22:29] - Perks & Paternity Leave [25:18] - Vacation [26:29] - Choosing an Industry and deciding on AirBnB [29:03] - Preparing for Interview, and the interview process [31:18] - Deciding on the size of the company [33:08] -  Difference in management in civilian life vs. the military [36:58] - Advice to current college students planning a transition to civilian life [38:23] - Advice to officers thinking of getting out of the military in the next 1-2 years [40:16] - Most surprising aspects of transition from active duty

97. Robert Miller: Medical Devices, Operations, and Using a Recruiter
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"I went from career military to dedicated civilian overnight. But it turned out that not too terribly much changed about the approach in general. The skills from the Marine Corps - the leadership, the time management, the prioritization, the ability...to be tactful, and to try to be a little bit influential to secure the items that your guys need...those are the things you lean on almost all day."
– Rob Miller

Rob Miller - Rob is an Operations Manager in the Medical Device industry at a company called Drummond Scientific. Growing up in Charlotte, North Carolina, Rob enlisted in the US Marine Corps where he served as a technician on the stinger missile systems. After three years, while serving in Iraq he was accepted to the US Naval Academy, and returned back to the Marine Corps after graduating from USNA:

How he left the Marine Corps after always thinking he would spend his career in the military How he used a recruiter to accelerate his job search How the Marine Corps prepared him for his role in operations What his day-to-day life is like as an Operations Manager How Operations gives him exposure to every aspect of the company How he used an Executive MBA program to learn while being apply his lessons to his job And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes.  Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

 

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode 2nd Intelligene Battalion, Marine Corps 300 PFT (perfect score on the Marine Corps physical readiness test) Drummond Scientific The Lucas Group Wharton's Executive MBA (EMBA) Program Show Notes [1:40] - Growing up and enlisting in the Marine Corps [4:35] - A delayed USNA acceptance letter received in Iraq [8:36] - Rejoining the Corps as an officer [9:23] - Deciding to leave the Marine Corps [12:30] - Choosing to not join the Reserves [15:30] - Overview on the Medical Devices Industry [20:00] - Choosing his first job, and working with the Lucas Group [29:30] - Advice for those considering working with a Recruiting Firm [34:58] - The day-to-day life of an Operations Manager [39:30] - Why Veterans are well suited to Operations, and why it's a great first job [41:16] - Advantages and disadvantages of coming from the military [44:42] - Why you may get more out of an Executive MBA than a traditional MBA program [50:07] - Advice to those considering an EMBA program or Wharton

98. Jay Border: How to use an Executive MBA Program to Gain Career Clarity
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"A lot of us come out of the military and we've been reassured that our experience in the military is  highly valuable... and I believe that that's true, but I also believe that the transition is not as easy as people want you to believe. It's a lot of work and a full-time job to set yourself up to a successful transition."

– Jay Border

This is a great interview for anyone on Active Duty who is considering going to grad school - Jay does a great job of walking through his decision process amongst grad school programs, and whether to do full-time or part-time, during active duty or after active duty.

Jay Border grew up in South Florida. He had always wanted to be involved in government service, and saw that institutions like the FBI always viewed military service as a plus. That, combined with his love of the water and desire for an academic challenge drew him to the US Naval Academy, where he studied International Relations and National Security. He was selected for Aviation, however was medically disqualified during his pilot training. This lead to a lateral transfer to the Intelligence Community, where he supported Special Operations. While on Active Duty, he completed his Executive MBA (EMBA) at UCLA's Anderson School of Business, and is currently pursuing opportunities in the Private Equity space.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

His decision to leave the Navy How an Executive MBA program allowed him to maintain an income and evaluate a career inside and outside of the military Evaluating the financial difference between a private and public university with respect to the GI Bill Advantages that veterans have that they don't often realize as advantages Considering the cost of grad school How to use the GI Bill to make grad school more affordable How to use advisors, mentors, and your network to help narrow your job search and get an edge The value of "closing doors" on career possibilities early How to manage the early stages of a career search as if it were a full time job And much, much more…

Listen to it on iTunes. NEED TO CHANGE Stream by clicking here. Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode UCLA Anderson Executive MBA Program Message to Garcia Wharton's San Francisco EMBA program GI Bill Process Show Notes [1:28] - Personal background and decision to go to the Naval Academy [2:30] - The Naval Academy, Aviation and the Naval Intelligence Community [4:07] - Deciding to leave the Navy [7:27] - Reasons for choosing to join the Reserves [9:51] - Choosing business school over other graduate school programs [15:25] - Choosing an Executive MBA program over a traditional full-time program [22:45] - How the military got him ahead, and where he needed to catch up to his non-military peers [28:02] - Deciding on UCLA over other MBA programs [33:06] - Advice for how to manage a job search [39:58] - Building an "Advisory Board" to help with your transition [45:30] - Resources active duty military personnel should check out

99. BTU #1 Blake Lindsay: Active Duty to Management Consulting @ McKinsey & Co.
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 Blake Lindsay grew up all over the United States, and knew from an early age that he wanted to go to a service academy. At the Naval Academy, he was the Captain of the Men's Rugby Team while majoring in Ocean Engineering. After graduating from USNA in 2005, Blake joined the Surface Warfare Community and then went through the Nuclear Power pipeline. After Nuclear Power School and Prototype, Blake was stationed in Seattle with the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74). While on Active Duty, Blake went through Old Dominion University's graduate school, receiving his Master's in Engineering Management shortly after separating from the Navy. Blake's first job out of the military was with McKinsey & Co. in the industry of Management Consulting.

In this conversation, we cover a lot of topics, including:

His decision to leave the Navy, and how he thought about the Reserves Advice on pursuing a graduate degree while still on Active Duty Advice on weighing pursuing a degree during Active Duty, or afterwards What is Management Consulting, who are the key players, and what is McKinsey & Co. What does day-to-day and week-to-week life look like as a Consultant How management in consulting differs from management in the military The biggest advantage and disadvantage of coming from the military How to prepare for a Consulting interview Career potentials within a consulting firm, as well as transitioning out of consulting And much, much more…

QUESTION OF THE DAY: How can I make these episodes more valuable to active duty military personnel considering transitioning to the civilian world? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode USNA Rugby USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) Old Dominion University ODU - Applying credits from the Nuclear Power Pipeline to receive a master's degree Management Consulting Firms mentioned: McKinsey & Co., Bain, Boston Consulting Group, Deloitte, Accenture McKinsey Operations Practice Personal Experience Interview Show Notes [2:21] - Personal, Naval Academy, and Navy Background [4:48] - Decision to leave the Navy [6:08] - Aspects of the military Blake misses most and least post-separation [8:01] - Choosing whether or not to join the Navy Reserves [9:20] - How McKinsey works with the Reserves [10:20] - Old Dominion University, and pursuing a masters degree while on Active Duty [12:18] - Advice for doing graduate work while on Active Duty [15:16] - Overview on Management Consulting Industry and McKinsey & Co. [18:21] - Day-to-day life at McKinsey & Co. and as a Management Consultant [20:16] - Team structure at McKinsey & Co. [22:11] - What has been most helpful from Blake's military experience, and where has he most needed to catch up [25:06] - Hours and weekend work [27:11] - Interview process & preparation [29:43] - Career paths inside and outside of consulting [32:26] - Final advice to someone on Active Duty considering consulting