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Podcast title The latest stories from www.wnyc.org
Website URL http://www.wnyc.org/
Description The latest stories from www.wnyc.org
Updated Sat, 21 Sep 2019 05:06:00 -0400
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Link to this podcast The latest stories from www.wnyc.org

Episodes

1. The Frame: 2019 Emmy Preview Special
http://www.wnyc.org/story/fram... download (, 0.00Mb)

Description:

The Frame Emmy Special is KPCC’s annual preview of the Emmy Awards, which take place on Sept. 22. The one-hour special features interviews with this year’s most exciting people in TV.  Hosted by The Frame’s John Horn and LA Times TV critic, Lorraine Ali.

The nominees featured in The Frame's Emmy Preview Show are Mahershala Ali (True Detective), Ava DuVernay and John Leguizamo (separately, for When They See Us), Ben Stiller and Patricia Arquette (separately, for Escape From Dannemora), Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Veep), Michelle Williams (Fosse/Verdon), Maya Erskine& Anna Konkle (writing for comedy series PEN 15), Craig Nazin (creator of Chernobyl), and more.

Airs Saturday, September 21 at 10 pm on AM 820.

Also airs Sunday, September 22 at 6 pm on 93.9 FM.



2. 2019/09/21 09:00 GMT
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Description: The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.

3. Patriots Release Antonio Brown After Another Sexual Misconduct Allegation
https://www.npr.org/2019/09/21... download (, 0.00Mb)

Description:

The New England Patriots on Friday released wide receiver Antonio Brown, who had only been with the team for a short time, after a second woman accused him of sexual misconduct.

The defending Super Bowl champions announced the move in a statement emailed to reporters, minutes after Brown posted on Twitter: "Thank you for the opportunity @Patriots #GoWinIt."

The team's statement attributed to a Patriots spokesperson said, in its entirety: "The New England Patriots are releasing Antonio Brown. We appreciate the hard work of many people over the past 11 days, but we feel that it is best to move in a different direction at this time."

Two women have accused Brown of sexual misconduct. Former trainer Britney Taylor has filed a civil lawsuit against Brown — accusing him of rape and sexual assault on three occasions. The lawsuit became public last week, and Taylor has had meetings with the NFL.

Sports Illustrated reported this week that another woman said Brown sexually harassed her while she working at his home — she turned around to find him standing there naked except for a small towel covering his genitals.

SI reports the unidentified woman said she received "intimidating texts" after the magazine article detailed her allegations:

"The woman previously told SI that Brown had hired her two years ago to paint a mural of him in his home but "ghosted" her after she ignored his advance. On Wednesday night, the woman says, she received a group text message that appeared to come from the same phone number Brown provided to her in 2017. The text chain, with four other phone numbers on it, included photos of her and her children, with the person she believes is Brown encouraging others in the group to investigate the woman. The texter accused the artist of fabricating her account of the 2017 incident for cash. (In her letter to the league, the woman's attorney repeated that the artist is not seeking remuneration from Brown in connection with the alleged incident.)"

Analysts say they do not expected Brown to join another NFL team this season.

"It's unfortunate things didn't work out with the Patriots," Brown 's agent, Drew Rosenhaus tweeted. "But Antonio is healthy and is looking forward to his next opportunity in the NFL. He wants to play the game he loves and he hopes to play for another team soon."

Also this week, Nike cut ties with the receiver, saying in an email to The Associated Press on Friday, " Antonio Brown is not a Nike athlete."

Brown, a four-time All-Pro, began his career in Pittsburgh after being drafted in 2010 as a sixth-round pick by the Steelers. Over time his relationship with the Steelers soured and he was traded this year to the Oakland Raiders.

Oakland signed Brown to a contract that would have paid him up to $50 million over the next three seasons, but he never played a game for the team. After getting into disagreements with the coach and general manager, he was released.

A few hours later, the Patriots signed Brown to a one-year deal that would have guaranteed him $9 million and paid him up to $15 million this season.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Statement from a #Patriots spokesperson: https://t.co/c98rNDX9QGpic.twitter.com/DAohupBLHo

— New England Patriots (@Patriots) September 20, 2019

It's unfortunate things didn't work out with the Patriots. But Antonio is healthy and is looking forward to his next opportunity in the NFL. He wants to play the game he loves and he hopes to play for another team soon.

— Drew Rosenhaus (@RosenhausSports) September 20, 2019



4. 2019/09/21 08:00 GMT
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Description: The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.

5. Review: Derren Brown's 'Secret' Is That His Magic Show's a Blast
http://www.wnyc.org/story/revi... download (audio/mpeg, 1.08Mb)

Description:

What exactly happens in magician Derren Brown's new Broadway show "Secret" is, well, supposed to be a secret. But this is what I can tell you: it's one of the most entertaining, enjoyable magic shows I've seen in a long time. 

Brown is a mentalist — if you've seen his Netflix show (I hadn't) then you know his schtick is that he never pretends to be psychic. Instead, he says that he can "read" people's mind through their words and body language, and sneakily direct them to do the things he wants them to do through a combination of priming and suggestion.

But honestly, it's easier to believe that he IS a psychic then to wrap your mind around what's happening between Brown and the audience. The things he finds out from people are astonishing. 

What makes this show really a standout, though, is that it is structured a lot like improvisational comedy, with call-backs and through=lines and an ending that wraps it all up in a way that will blow your mind. It's very satisfying, in a way that most magic just isn't.

That's all I'm going to say. Except: Really. How does he DO that?

 

"Secret" is at the Cort Theater through Jan. 4.



6. 2019/09/21 07:00 GMT
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Description: The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.

7. America’s Drug War, Revealed (rebroadcast)
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Description:

How a baggie of crack cocaine packed with fear, distortion and misconceptions, and one presidential address in the 1980s, helped shape the war on drugs.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.



8. 2019/09/21 06:00 GMT
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Description: The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.

9. 2019/09/21 05:00 GMT
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Description: The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.

10. 2019/09/21 04:00 GMT
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Description: The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.

11. U.S., El Salvador Sign New Asylum Deal To Stem Tide Of Migrants
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Description:

The United States and El Salvador signed an agreement Friday aimed at deterring the flow of migrants seeking to enter this country by requiring them to seek asylum in that Central American nation on their way here.

In a signing ceremony in Washington, D.C., Kevin McAleenan, the acting secretary of the Department of Homeland Security and Alexandra Hill Tinoco, El Salvador's foreign minister, inked a "cooperative asylum agreement." But they provided no details about how the agreement will work, when it goes into effect, or who it will be impact.

"This agreement today is one significant step forward," McAleenan said in a live-streamed press conference. "El Salvador is a critical partner for the United States in promoting the security and prosperity of Central America."

"We are working every single day to try to solve this issue of people, who by various reasons, reasons of insecurity or reasons of death threats are forced to leave our country," Hill Tinoco said.

The agreement appears to put in El Salvador in the position of accepting migrants from third countries who would otherwise seek to enter the U.S. Hill Tinoco said El Salvador wants to cooperate with the U.S. and that economic investment in El Salvador is key to improving her country's ability to keep its own citizens from fleeing.

The agreement also aligns with the administration's "third country" asylum rule, although that term was not used in the press conference.

The administration signed a similar agreement with Guatemala in July, but questions remain about that country's capacity to comply. Lawmakers there have yet to ratify it.

Immigrant advocates denounced the deal.

"If this agreement goes into effect, the U.S. will be forcing the most vulnerable communities to seek safety in a country that is not equipped to protect its own citizens or provide economic opportunity," said Oscar Chacon, executive director of Alianza Americas, a network of immigrant-led organizations.

A 2018 State Department report on human rights in El Salvador cites allegations of unlawful killings and torture by security forces, as well as forced disappearances by military personnel. The report describes a "lack of government respect for judicial independence" and "widespread government corruption."

"Impunity persisted despite government steps to dismiss and prosecute some in the security forces, executive branch, and justice system who committed abuses," the report added.

It is not clear whether El Salvador's cooperation on asylum is tied to other bi-lateral issues, most prominently, the status of some 200,000 Salvadorans living in the Unites States under temporary protected status. The administration sought to end that program for Salvadorans and citizens of three other countries, but a federal judge has intervened. The temporary protections are due to end in January 2020.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.


12. 2019/09/21 03:00 GMT
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Description: The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.

13. Margaret Atwood & Ursula K. Le Guin | Nilufer Yanya | OK Theater’s 100th Anniversary
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Description: What gets us through those uncertain moments? The speculative story? The daring album concept? The strenuous film shoot? The risky venture? RESOLVE. This week: square-jawed stories from tenacious creators.

14. Latest Newscast From the WNYC Newsroom
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Description: None

15. 2019/09/21 02:00 GMT
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Description: The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.

16. Twitter Removes Thousands Of Accounts For Manipulating Their Platform
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Description:

Twitter permanently suspended thousands of accounts in its ongoing effort to fight the spread of disinformation and political discord on its platform, the company announced Friday.

The accounts originated from six different countries. And they included the Twitter account used by Saud al-Qahtani, a former adviser to Saudi Arabia's crown prince and suspected of being involved in the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

It's all a part of Twitter's seemingly endless task of fighting disinformation.

The Twitter accounts came from the United Arab Emirates, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Ecuador and China, according to Twitter's blog post. Groups of suspended accounts were involved in various information campaigns, using tactics like spreading content through fake accounts and spamming through retweets.

The accounts were suspended for violating Twitter's policy on platform manipulation, which Twitter defines as large-scale aggressive or deceptive activity that misleads or disrupts people's social media activity.

Twitter has been suspending or removing accounts linked to this sort of activity throughout the year. In August, the company suspended around 200,000 accounts it reported were used to discredit pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong.

Tech companies like Facebook, Twitter and Google have been combating disinformation campaigns for a few years in response criticism in the wake of reports that foreign governments exploit their platforms for their own agendas.

So far, the companies' progress has been slow, said Nina Jankowicz, a global fellow at the Wilson Center's Kennan Institute in Washington D.C.

She said shutting down disinformation campaigns will take both tech-based solutions and educating people through digital literacy.


"It doesn't matter how many of these accounts we delete, they're just going to keep cropping back up," Jankowicz said.

Twitter didn't just suspend or remove the accounts. The company also put many of them into an archive of millions of tweets the platform identified as part of "state-backed information operations." The idea is to house all the disinformation in one place for research purposes.


Twitter's release of this information is a step toward self-policing and transparency. But Jankowicz said the move only offers a glimpse of what's out there. She said researchers estimate the percent of fake accounts on Twitter and Facebook accounts are much higher than what the social media platforms say.

"Access to data is the linchpin to everything in terms of understanding how social media is really affecting our day to day lives," she said.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.


17. 2019/09/21 01:00 GMT
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Description: The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.

18. 'Storm Area 51' Fails To Materialize
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Description:

The secrets of Area 51, the highly classified Air Force facility long rumored to house extraterrestrial artifacts, remain unseen.

Despite millions responding to the public Facebook event "Storm Area 51, They Can't Stop All of Us," Nevada authorities say about 40 people gathered at the gates before being confronted and dispersed by law enforcement.

According to the Lincoln County Sheriff's office, one arrest was made — not for an attempt at freeing an alien, but for public urination.

Ten days before the planned raid, two Dutch tourists were arrested after being found trespassing on Department of Energy land near Area 51.

"They said they saw the no trespassing signs at the Mercury Highway entrance to the Nevada National Security Site, but they wanted to look at the facility," said the Nye County Sheriff's Office on their Facebook.

Since then, the two men were sentenced to a year in county jail, which was suspended in favor of a three-day imprisonment and a monetary fine.

In an interview with NPR, Matty Roberts, the creator of the event, discouraged potential visitors from actually going to Area 51.

"I'm really trying to direct people away from actually going towards the military base because that both is dangerous, and it's a national security threat," said Roberts. "So I'm trying to direct people towards the safer option of just going to one of these mini parties that's being set up."

Roberts is referring to AlienStock and Storm Area 51 Basecamp, two "music festivals" that capitalize on the popularity of the original Facebook event. The two gatherings are hosted in Las Vegas and Hiko respectively.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Revelers gather at 3 a.m. to honor the original Storm Area 51 idea outside of the Area 51 rear gate as the Alienstock festival continues in nearby Rachel, Nevada. #stormarea51#area51#alienstock#rjnowpic.twitter.com/JRo21KpMIr

— L.E. Baskow (@Left_Eye_Images) September 20, 2019

...aaaand #AlienStock is officially underway! 👽@FOX5Vegaspic.twitter.com/eXlOISYRUR

— Vania Beltran (@vaniabeltran) September 20, 2019



19. Trump Sends Troops To Middle East After Attack On Saudi Oil Facilities
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Description:

President Trump has authorized the deployment of additional U.S. forces to the Middle East to strengthen air and missile defenses around Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, the Pentagon announced late Friday.

Defense Secretary Mark Esper called the move a first step and said that the deployment would be defensive in nature. He said the deployment comes in response to requests for help from Saudi Arabia and the UAE.

General Joseph Dunford, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, called the deployment moderate, but offered no specifics on the number of troops involved. He said the Pentagon would have more to say about the deployment next week.

The announcement appears to signal that President Trump has not yet decided whether to order to a military strike against Iran, which the administration has said was behind the attack on Saudi oil facilities.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.


20. 23 States Sue Trump Administration In Escalating Battle Over Emissions Standards
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Description:

Just two days after the Trump administration revoked California's right to set its own emissions standards for automobiles, the state has fired back.

California, 22 other states and several major cities filed a lawsuit in federal court Friday against the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which is the division of the Department of Transportation that issued the rule revoking California's authority.

The move "exceeds NHTSA's authority, contravenes Congressional intent, and is arbitrary and capricious, and because NHTSA has failed to conduct the analysis required under the National Environmental Policy Act," states the complaint filed in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

The NEPA, signed into law in 1970, is considered a kind of "national charter" for regulating the protection of the environment.

"Two courts have already upheld California's emissions standards, rejecting the argument the Trump Administration resurrects to justify its misguided Preemption Rule," California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said in a statement released Friday. "Yet, the Administration insists on attacking the authority of California and other states to tackle air pollution and protect public health."

Becerra and his 23 co-plaintiffs — which comprise Democratic attorneys general from 22 states and the District of Columbia, as well as the cities of Los Angeles and New York — are demanding that the Trump administration's move be declared unlawful and repealed.

"Remarkably," their complaint explained, "NHTSA has conducted no analysis at all of the environmental impacts of a regulation that purports to preempt air pollution laws in effect in states that represent more than a third of the nation's automobile market."

In a conversation with All Things Considered after the lawsuit was filed Friday, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler said that California's fuel economy standards would effectively "end up applying to the entire country" — because automakers would be unlikely to make two separate versions of the same car to comply with differing state regulations.

"What we are talking about here is energy efficiency," Wheeler said, "and that is something that we don't believe the state of California or any other state should be setting for the entire country."

This week's back-and-forth marks a new — and not entirely surprising —escalation in the fight over climate policy between the Trump administration and the country's most populous state. Earlier this month the Department of Justice launched an antitrust investigation into a deal struck in July between California and four major automakers, Ford, Volkswagen, Honda and BMW.

Under the terms of the agreement, which the administration says may be illegal, the companies said they'd produce passenger vehicles averaging 51 miles per gallon by model year 2026, a timeline that accords with regulations set by the Obama administration.

Under Trump, the EPA has has sought to roll back many of the environmental rules put in place by Obama — not just when it comes to fuel economy standards, but also methane emissions, air pollution and coal plants, among others.

"We are not supposed to go above and beyond and create our own laws," Wheeler explained to NPR. "And under my administration here at EPA under President Trump, we are not going to create our own laws. We are going to follow the laws that Congress passed."

These efforts at deregulation have put the Trump administration squarely at odds with the California state government — and California politicians say they have no intention of backing down, including when it comes to this most recent fight.

"The Oval Office is really not a place for on-the-job training. President Trump should have at least read the instruction manual he inherited when he assumed the Presidency, in particular the chapter on respecting the Rule of Law," Becerra said Friday. "Mr. President, we'll see you in court."

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.


21. 2019/09/21 00:00 GMT
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Description: The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.

22. The secret memo
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Description:

There’s a whistleblower complaint from a member of the intelligence community that has something to do with President Trump communicating an inappropriate promise to a foreign leader. Multiple outlets are reporting the memo is about Ukraine and the president’s efforts to lean on the Ukranian government to investigate Joe Biden. But the acting director of national intelligence won’t share the complaint with Congress even though they are ordinarily legally entitled to see it. So, information about the complaint has been leaking. What could the president have said to prompt the whistleblower complaint? Evelyn Farkas joins the panel to discuss that, and the attack on a Saudi oil facility, what it means for the American economy and what had looked like hopes for a Trump thaw with Iran.

Then: like many politicians in Washington, we will revisit the fight over Brett Kavanaugh, plus the fight between supporters of Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders. 

Finally: Christopher Ingraham of the Washington Post will make the case for moving your family to rural Minnesota, like he did.



23. Greta Thunberg:“We deserve a safe future”
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Description: Millions of young people across the globe campaigned against climate change and Greta Thunberg the teenager who started the movement addressed crowds in New York. This comes before Monday’s UN climate summit. Also: President Trump dismisses whistleblower allegations, and we hear from the young people on the Kosovo Serbian divide.

24. Through Grief and Growing Pains, Kemba Creates 'Gilda'
https://www.npr.org/2019/09/20... download (, 0.00Mb)

Description:

Grief can feel like a new world emerging, swallowing up the reality you once knew and expanding into something entirely all-consuming. New York rapper Kemba used that monolithic feeling to create his major label debut album, Gilda, a record that pays tribute to his mother who passed away two years ago.

Kemba's mother raised him and his two brothers in The Bronx, N.Y., a place that gave him little choice but to be immersed in hip-hop

"Coming from The Bronx, I was forced and raised to study the history and different artists' technical abilities," he says. "Whether it was similes, metaphors, inner rhyming, I know all of that stuff, but so do a lot of other people. I think my perspective is what makes my music unique."

Kemba says his mother helped shape this perspective. The rapper remembers her as a fighter and a self-starter, equally determined to improve herself and shed light on others around her. "I really learned from watching her," Kemba says. "In my older years, she went to and finished college and got her master's."

Kemba also remembers his mother was also always by his side. When he was diagnosed with a tumor on his jaw as a teenager, she was with him every step of the way — even as this setback drew his rap career into question.

"They told me I shouldn't rap," Kemba remembers. "They told me my jaw was so weak that just movement could rip apart the work that they did. That was the first time my mom saw me in a vulnerable way. I was always the strong one of the family, and that just made her break down even more."

Gilda is named after his mom. Her legacy runs deep through the album, through avenues that are at times heart-wrenching ("Exhale" feat. Smino) and other times, dizzying and chaotic ("Dysfunction.") Now, with a major label debut, there isn't anything stopping Kemba from sticking to what he knows.

Kemba spoke with NPR's Audie Cornish about the themes of Gilda, and the emotional labor that went into making it. Hear their conversation at the audio link.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.


25. New England Patriots Cut Antonio Brown
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Description:
Copyright 2019 WGBH Radio. To see more, visit WGBH Radio.


26. 2019/09/20 23:00 GMT
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Description: The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.

27. The GM strike marches on
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Description:

General Motors workers have been striking since midnight on Sunday after contract negotiations broke down. The company’s use of temp workers is one of the main reasons for the strike. Temps make less money, don’t get benefits and can take very limited time off, unpaid. We hear from one GM worker who was a temp for four years before being hired full time. Plus: Why grad students might lose their ability to unionize, and what items will be exempt from tariffs.



28. 2019/09/20 22:00 GMT
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Description: The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.

29. Climate change: millions protest worldwide
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Description: Worldwide demonstrations are held to protest global warming. We hear from the teenager behind the strike, Swedish campaigner Greta Thunberg. Also on the programme: A US Congressman tells us about the controversy surrounding a whistleblower being prevented from speaking; and the American gun manufacturer who is no longer producing its civilian semi-automatic rifles. (Photo: Youths walk down Pennsylvania Avenue while participating in the Climate Strike March in Washington DC on 20 September 2019. Credit: EPA/ Michael Reynolds)

30. Background On The Intelligence Community Whistleblower's Complaint
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Description:
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.


31. #940: Interest Rates... Why So Negative?
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Description: All over the world, interest rates are very, very low. In some places, they're negative: you lend out money, and get less back. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

32. Charlie Pierce: The Week In Sports
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Description:

Karen Given and Charlie Pierce discuss Antonio Brown, Patrick Mahomes' amazing early-season performance and more.



33. 3 Stories: Women's World Cup Ad Revenue, Cubs' Collapse, The 'Grandmasters Diet'
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Description:

The Wall Street Journal's Rachel Bachman and New York Magazine contributing editor Will Leitch join Only A Game's Karen Given.



34. Meltdown: How Tommy John Committed 3 Errors In 12 Seconds
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Description:

Tommy John is known for his long pitching career and for the elbow surgery that bears his name. But he also holds a little-known MLB record.



35. #WearPinkForWendy, Cave Diving ... In An Iceberg, Tommy John's 3-Error Meltdown
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Description:

After losing his wife, Wendy, to breast cancer, Arkansas State football coach Blake Anderson found support in an unexpected place: enemy territory. This week on Only A Game, the story of why Georgia Bulldogs fans chose to #WearPinkForWendy. Also, cave diver and underwater filmmaker Jill Heinerth's brushes with death as she and her crew became the first-ever to cave dive inside an iceberg. And how Tommy John set an undesirable MLB record in a matter of 12 seconds.



36. 'The Cave Tried To Keep Us': The First-Ever Dive Inside An Iceberg
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Description:

Jill Heinerth is one of the most accomplished cave divers in the world. But she and her crew were in danger when they explored Antarctica's B-15 iceberg.



37. Why Georgia Bulldogs Fans Ditched Black And Red To #WearPinkForWendy
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Description:

When Arkansas State football coach Blake Anderson emerged from the visitors' locker room at UGA's Sanford Stadium, he had more than a few supporters in the crowd.



38. Walmart To Stop Selling E-Cigarettes
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Description:

Walmart says it will stop selling electronic cigarettes, at namesake stores and Sam's Club locations. The nation's largest retailer is responding to growing health concerns around vaping, especially among young people.

Walmart cited "growing federal, state and local regulatory complexity and uncertainty regarding e-cigarettes," saying that its stores will stop selling e-cigarettes once the current inventory is sold.

Just on Thursday, U.S. health officials said there are now 530 confirmed or probable cases of lung injury associated with vaping, a jump from 380 cases reported last week. Eight people have died.

As NPR previously reported, vaping products originally were welcomed by many people as a potentially safer alternative to cigarettes. And while millions of adults have switched from cigarettes, vaping has also attracted a new generation of nicotine addicts.

Between 2017 and 2019 vaping jumped dramatically among high school students, doubling from 11% to 25% of 12th-graders, according to a report out Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The Trump administration has moved toward banning flavored vaping products, and similar bans are already in place in the states of New York and Michigan.

Earlier this year, Walmart told regulators that it would raise the minimum age for buying tobacco products to 21 and that it would stop selling fruit- and dessert-flavored e-cigarettes. Vaping products are only a part of Walmart's tobacco offerings, which include cigarettes and smokeless tobacco.

Pharmacy chains Rite Aid and Walgreens this year also raised the tobacco-buying age to 21. Rite Aid said in April that it would stop selling e-cigarettes and vaping products. CVS stopped selling all tobacco products in 2014.

Major media companies like CBS and CNN, for their part, have said they would stop airing commercials by e-cigarette companies like Juul. U.S. regulators and lawmakers in Congress are looking into Juul and its advertising practices. Next week, the House of Representatives will hold hearings on health impacts of vaping.

Editor's note: Walmart is one of NPR's recent financial supporters.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.


39. 2019/09/20 21:00 GMT
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Description: The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.

40. Trump Rules Out Sending Captured ISIS Fighters To Guantánamo Bay
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Description:

The U.S. military prison in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, is nearly empty these days, but President Trump is explicitly ruling out the possibility of sending thousands of captured Islamic State fighters there.

"The United States is not going to have thousands and thousands of people that we've captured stationed at Guantánamo Bay, held captive at Guantánamo Bay for the next 50 years and us spending billions and billions of dollars," Trump told reporters Friday during an appearance at the White House with Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

"I want the countries to take back the captured ISIS fighters," Trump added, noting that many of these captives come from European nations, including Germany and France. "And if they don't take them back, we're going to probably put them at the border, and then they'll have to capture them again."

Few of the foreign ISIS fighters captured on the battlefield in Syria and Iraq have been repatriated. Without embassies in those war-torn nations or extradition treaties, European allies of the U.S. have been reluctant to accept nationals being held as prisoners of war.

"It is certainly not as easy as they think in America," German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas told reporters earlier this year. "German citizens have the right to return, but we have little ability in Syria at present to check whether German citizens are actually affected."

Approximately 2,000 fighters are being held by the Kurdish-dominated Syrian Defense Forces in northeastern Syria with assistance from U.S. military forces. Trump demanded at a separate White House event Friday that their home countries "take those people back, put them on trial, and do what they have to do to them."

There is growing concern among U.S. and SDF officials that the makeshift prisons where the fighters are being held are vulnerable to attacks by the captured insurgents' comrades-in-arms.

While campaigning in 2016, Trump promised he would send more prisoners to Guantánamo Bay. "We're gonna load it up with some bad dudes, believe me," he told a rally in Sparks, Nev. "We're gonna load it up."

But no new prisoners have been sent to the Guantánamo lockup since the final year of the George W. Bush administration. An inmate population there of nearly 700 at its peak dwindled to 41 by the time Trump took office. With the transfer last year of one of those captives, the number now stands at 40.

Renovation and expansion of prison facilities in Guantánamo along with the construction of permanent housing for guards had fueled speculation that preparations were underway for an influx of ISIS fighters. Trump signed an executive order last year reaffirming the need to keep the Guantánamo stockade in operation.

Trump said last month that European leaders, who have long criticized the Guantánamo prison, had asked him to use that facility to house the ISIS fighters captured in Syria and Iraq. "They say to us, 'Why don't you hold them in Guantánamo Bay for 50 years and you just hold them and spend billions and billions of dollars holding them?' " Trump said at a Kentucky veterans convention. "And I'm saying, 'No, you got to take them.' "

Trump's emphasis on the cost of holding inmates in Guantánamo coincides with recent reports detailing how $6 billion has been spent keeping terrorism suspects locked up and how the annual cost per prisoner has risen to $13 million.

Trump did not explain how the U.S. might go about carrying out his threat that unless European allies accept nationals who are Islamic State prisoners of war, "we're releasing them at the border."

He did make clear, though, that he is not contemplating Guantánamo as an alternative destination for those captives.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.


41. PHOTOS: Drag Queens In South Africa Embrace Queerness And Tradition
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When Belinda Qaqamba Ka-Fassie dresses in drag, she doesn't typically go for on the sequins and feather boas worn by performers on RuPaul's Drag Race. A post-graduate student of education at Stellenbosch University in Cape Town, South Africa, Ka-Fassie might put on a dress that resembles the white blanket typically worn by boys at a traditional male circumcision ritual, called ulwaluko, and she might add a multi-colored headpiece and beaded stick, both handmade and used by brides.

It's a very deliberate choice made by black drag queens from townships who are celebrating their roots and challenging dress codes for men and women through their traditional apparel. "We cannot separate our queerness from our Xhosaness," says Ka-Fassie, a drag queen and activist.

Yet even as they embrace their culture, township drag queens outside of Cape Town, as in other parts of the world, face grave risks. They must often suppress their queer identity in their communities for their safety — traveling into the city for pageants and parties, then de-dragging before they go home.

The limbo they live exists even in the terminology for their identity. There is no word to describe queerness in Xhosa, the indigenous language widely spoken in South Africa. The words that do exist are often insulting to the queer community, describing sexual behavior and denying queer people dignity. "When I came out to my family, I couldn't find the appropriate word in Xhosa to explain my queerness," Ka-Fassie says.

#BlackDragMagic is the name of a photo project in collaboration with Ka-Fassie – a series of portraits showing how drag can be an art form in Africa that differs from mainstream aesthetics in the West.

All of the portraits were taken on a single afternoon in August, with a pickup truck serving as a makeup station and changing room. The subjects — queer, black, gender-nonconforming and trans — were photographed throughout the township of Khayelitsha, which means "new home" in Xhosa. The township is located on the Cape Flats, about 15 miles southeast of Cape Town.

The girls walked down the streets that day in a group, proudly and unapologetically. "I carry my African-ness and my queerness on my sleeve because it is who I am," says Mandisi Dolle Phika, one of the photo subjects.

Discrimination is a part of everyday life for queer people in the townships, especially at taxi stands, churches and schools. In the Western Cape alone, a 2016 survey of 112 LGBT participants age 16 to 24 by Love Not Hate, a national campaign addressing anti-gay hate crimes, found that about two-thirds of LGBT people between the ages of 16 to 24 reported experiencing discrimination at school. Reliable statistics are rare, because queer people in townships often choose not to report harassment or violence out of fears for their safety and distrust of local law enforcement.

Black queer people here, as in many other parts of the world, also struggle to be understood by their health care system. Some studies have found that LGBT patients have been subjected to discrimination, with health care providers refusing them care or doling out moral judgment. Long lines of people waiting for free treatment at clinics or state hospitals in impoverished areas can lead to a lack of privacy for patients. As a result, many avoid medical care or receive poor care.

But the picture doesn't have to be bleak. "Living in a township has taught me to be strong and strive. I have dealt with the stigma and hate, and now am stronger," said Liyana Arianna Madikizela, a 17-year-old who posed for photographs.

Madikizela embodies the strength and resilience the drag queens have shown in the face of injustice and oppression. "I want to become the role model I never saw in the streets of Kayamandi," she said. "Someone who is unapologetically gender non-conforming and who navigates their lives against all the hostile odds of living in the township."

Lee-Ann Olwage is a South Africa-based photographer. Sasha Ingber is a Washington, D.C., freelance writer. Belinda Qaqamba Ka-Fassie, a drag artist and advocate, collaborated with Olwage on this project.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.


42. How To Design A Female-Friendly Toilet
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Just because there's a toilet built for women and girls, it doesn't necessarily meet their needs.

A growing body of literature says public and school toilets in low- and middle-income countries all too often lack the basic elements women need for privacy and safety, and have design flaws that can leave users vulnerable to violent attacks.

The latest study, out this month in the Journal of Adolescence, looks at menstrual needs. Interviewing 312 girls in three provinces in Pakistan, the researchers found toilets showed "gender-insensitive design," lacked disposal options for menstrual products and were unsafely located.

So what would a female-friendly toilet look like?

A design guide for female-friendly public and community toilets explains what features are essential and desirable in a bathroom facility for women. The guide, released in 2018, was authored by an international team of WASH specialists from nonprofit groups and academia (WASH stands for "water, sanitation and hygiene management").

Marni Sommer of the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, one of the authors of the design guide, says the recommendations are intended for a wide variety of toilet designs across a range of cultural and geographic contexts. "It's slight modifications," she says. "Not an entirely different structure or approach."

Asked why the guide is necessary, the WASH specialists interviewed for this story offer a variety of theories. Chris Bobel is a professor at the University of Massachusetts Boston and author of The Managed Body: Developing Girls and Menstrual Health in the Global South. "Whenever there's a lot of people and inadequate resources, toilets are often the thing that people sort of cut corners on," Bobel says.

Poop is part of the problem, especially in urban areas and emergency contexts, says Louisa Gosling, a program manager at WaterAid, an international London-headquartered NGO that co-authored the design guide. "Historically," Gosling says, "[toilet designers] were focused more on the issue of separating people from feces, you know, it's all about the pit. Not so much about the experience of the user." User-focused design is now catching on, she says.

Ultimately all the WASH specialists agreed that the primary reason more toilets aren't female-friendly in the first place is the under-representation of people who menstruate in toilet construction, design and engineering.

The design guide itself puts safety considerations at the top of the list. The guide says that toilet doors should have internal locks and that toilets should be situated in an accessible location that's not poorly-lit or too remote.

"When people are caring for their bodily needs — they're defecating, they're urinating, they're caring for their menstruating body — they are exposed to risk. They are more vulnerable. They're partially naked, they're alone, they're distracted," Bobel says.

"It's not trivial," Bobel adds. "I know that women in some settings will dehydrate because they don't want to have to get up in the middle of the night and go try to urinate because that might be unsafe."

Besides safety, another key consideration in the design guide is that the bathrooms need to account for menstrual hygiene practices.

"When you're menstruating," Gosling says, "and changing your products, whether that's something you throw away or something that you wash and reuse, you'll need water and soap, ideally." She adds that toilets should include a place to dispose of single-use products "safely and in a dignified way," like a designated menstrual waste container within an individual stall.

Bobel points out that although many men in low- and middle-income countries are also impacted by inadequate toilet facilities, "certainly female bodies have particular needs." She said, "I don't want to reinforce stigma by saying that menstruation must be private, but I want to be realistic. Because menstruation is so deeply stigmatized, there is a need for more privacy" for women's facilities. The design guide notes that construction materials should be opaque and shouldn't leave holes or gaps in the roof or walls.

Additional recommendations in the guide are that toilets have hooks or shelves to keep personal items and garments off the floor, be accessible to all users, be affordable and available, be well-maintained and accommodate women who are accompanied by children or elders they care for. For example, a caregiver-friendly toilet would be big enough for more than one person.

But that issue raises another concern. Men can be caregivers, and some transgender men can menstruate. "What we need," says Bobel, "are inclusive, supportive toilets for all bodies."

Emily Vaughn is an intern on NPR's Science Desk.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.


43. Fantastic Fungi
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Description: Paul Stamets has been studying mushrooms for most of his life. Even though he doesn’t have a scientific degree, Stamets is one of the most well known advocates for the benefits and value of fungi. Stamets is featured in a new film called “Fantastic Fungi,” which will be opening next weekend at Cinema 21. Paul Stamets will be speaking tonight at Newmark Theater.

44. Portland Youth Join Climate Strike
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Description: Portland students are organizing a walkout today calling on government officials to take action on climate change. Organizer Jaden Winn tells us what he hopes the march accomplishes.

45. News Roundtable
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Description: We get opinions and analysis on some of the biggest news of the week from Rachael McDonald, Julie Parrish, and Marisa Zapata.

46. Week In Politics: Whistleblower Controversy, Iran
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47. EPA Administrator Weighs In On California Emissions Decision
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48. Walmart To Stop Selling E-Cigarettes
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49. The Supreme Court And Code Of Ethics
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50. China Has A Lot At Stake As Attacks In Persian Gulf Rise
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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.